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I have a client with an 8 yr old maltese. She has 2 others also, and I groom all 3 every 4 weeks. This time when they came in I could tell a huge difference in Abby. She and her sister Bailey look like twins. Usually I can only tell them apart by their collars. Abby has lost a lot of weight and her coat had not grown back. She literally looked like I had just groomed her. Today she was diagnosed with diabetes. The vet said she would need a high fiber diet and insulin shots 2x a day. He said he would probably put his dog down because of how confining it is for the dog and the family.

The owner is one of my best clients and called me for advice, however, I have no experience with diabetic dogs. I was just wondering if anyone had any input on this.

Thanks for any help.
 

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I have a client with an 8 yr old maltese. She has 2 others also, and I groom all 3 every 4 weeks. This time when they came in I could tell a huge difference in Abby. She and her sister Bailey look like twins. Usually I can only tell them apart by their collars. Abby has lost a lot of weight and her coat had not grown back. She literally looked like I had just groomed her. Today she was diagnosed with diabetes. The vet said she would need a high fiber diet and insulin shots 2x a day. He said he would probably put his dog down because of how confining it is for the dog and the family.

The owner is one of my best clients and called me for advice, however, I have no experience with diabetic dogs. I was just wondering if anyone had any input on this.

Thanks for any help.
I have no experience with it BUT if the family is willing to give the dog insulin, I don;t know why the vet suggest putting the dog to sleep. I have seen and read many stories of owners who treat there dogs and they are fine.
 

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From my understanding of it, it take a lot of work. The dog has to be tested from urine every few days on the sugar test sticks, their diets have to be very strict on what they eating and what time they are eating. Same with exercise because everything they do can throw their sugar off. Much like humans.

I feel for them. I would guess that would interfere greatly with the other dogs and a home that is busy on the go..


This seemed like a decent website and forum, maybe help them research a bit more on what they can/cannot manage.
http://www.k9diabetes.com/
 

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It is extreamly confining, but i would not put my dog down just because of that. Strict feeding, strict times, chart when you gave it so a family member doesnt double dose, alot of time and tons of $$$ getting them regulated. You dont have to do at home urine tests as dogs are not as sensitive as humans on that as far as the strict regulations. Weekly blood glucose tests at your vets though until they are regulated. It is extreamly expensive and adds up quickly. It is something that the Whole family has to be on board. What if the person doing the shots goes on vacation? They have to have alot of communication so they dont double give (that could kill the dog).

Doable? Yes! Work? Yes! It is up to them, their finances, and the work they are willing to do. Good luck to them!
 

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Just high fiber?
The owners who shop at our store (for their diabetic dogs) are feeding grain free dry and adding Merrick's can's (the ones that show 'Low Glycemic' on the label)

As soon as they think it's ok to give them something else, they crash and come running back in for what has been working.

It isn't easy... but if they are dedicated to her care, it can be done.
Sure wish them the best for their sweet girl.

Karen
 

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I agree. I think it honestly takes a special person, not the average pet owner to care for a dog with this.. I would hate for them to put the dog down over it but again it depends on the advanced stages of it and the cost involved - too include possible time off work for flare ups...if both adults work. There really are a lot of factors they are facing. They must really think a lot of you to call you and ask yu what they should do? Just support their decision, and be their friend I suppose. I wish them luck.
 

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We have had some experience with Diabetes. Our Chihuahua was diagnosed with it at about 10 years of age. She was easily regulated and maintained much easier than others I have known with it.
You MUST stick to a very strict schedule as far as feeding and medicating. It is not easy for everyone, and every dog is different, but for us that part was not the hardest part. The hardest part was watching her deteriorate over the next two years. She went blind and became very distant. She would want to go out in the middle of the night and just wander the yard, no longer interested in interacting with the other dogs or people. She was not the same dog we had known and loved.
In retrospect I am not sure I would have done it again. I might have chosen to put her down when she was still herself. But it's easier to say than to do.
 

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8 yrs is pretty young for a Maltese, so I think I would give it a try. At the same time if the prognosis is bad, I wouldn't want to draw out the suffering for the dog or myself. It's a tough spot to be in.
 

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I have a client with an 8 yr old maltese. She has 2 others also, and I groom all 3 every 4 weeks. This time when they came in I could tell a huge difference in Abby. She and her sister Bailey look like twins. Usually I can only tell them apart by their collars. Abby has lost a lot of weight and her coat had not grown back. She literally looked like I had just groomed her. Today she was diagnosed with diabetes. The vet said she would need a high fiber diet and insulin shots 2x a day. He said he would probably put his dog down because of how confining it is for the dog and the family.

The owner is one of my best clients and called me for advice, however, I have no experience with diabetic dogs. I was just wondering if anyone had any input on this.

Thanks for any help.
I do not have experience with Diabetes in dogs but did have a Guinea Pig with it.I had to test her blood daily at first,then weekly.She was put on Glipazide (SP)2X a day.It was a pain but doable.I do have a very wonderful vet and it wasnt expensive.I bought the glucose test machine and test strips.The meds were $4 at WalMart.The vet doesnt sound like he is working with her too much.I would wonder why he is jumping right to injections 2X's a day instead of pills? OR maybe she is very bad,IDK.If I can manage a Guinea Pig with Diabetes,I would think a dog would be much easier.But,I did loose her this past Christmas.Had to put her down Christmas Day 09.
Hope they are able to work it out,it is hard but doable!! Good luck to them!
 

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.The vet doesnt sound like he is working with her too much.I would wonder why he is jumping right to injections 2X's a day instead of pills?
Because pills have been shown to be pretty ineffictive with dogs/cats. Injectable insulins are the "gold standard". Most of the injectables we carry range from 40-100$ depending on what type/brand (there are alot of factors on which one to use, and it goes individual too, we have put a pet on one and couldnt get them regulated so had to switch). Perhaps the vet also knows the clients better and though it might be too much for them???
We rarely get clients that choose to Not treat their pet for diabeties. Most do it, and generally do it well with help and guidence.
 

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I don't have personal experience, but from what I have heard, and as others have confirmed here already, it takes a lot of dedication and strict scheduling to make it work. If the dog were older, I might lean towards putting the dog down, but at 8 years old (which is middle aged for a maltese), I would at least TRY it out and see if I could handle the work.

To be honest, I know they asked you for advice, but a decision of this magnitude can only be made by them and rather than offer advice, I would just offer my support. They will know what they can handle and if they do choose to have the dog put to sleep, I bet they'll be really appreciative to have a friend like you to help them get through the mourning stages.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Just high fiber?
The owners who shop at our store (for their diabetic dogs) are feeding grain free dry and adding Merrick's can's (the ones that show 'Low Glycemic' on the label)

As soon as they think it's ok to give them something else, they crash and come running back in for what has been working.

It isn't easy... but if they are dedicated to her care, it can be done.
Sure wish them the best for their sweet girl.

Karen
That's what I was thinking. What type of grain free?
 
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