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Discussion Starter #661
Today I brought my PVC jump in the house. It fits in the hallway exactly with no room on either side. Noelle fetched her dumbbell over the jump twice. That's all I asked for and she got it exactly right. We also played stay while I wiggled the dumbbell. I got a whole lot of flinching, but I can train her not to flinch by not letting her get it if she flinches. Flinching stops the game and the dumbbell goes away. Her retrieves were about a foot and a half today. Sit/stay-->dumbbell is wiggling on the floor-->watch without flinching-->I remove my hand-->get it!

A whole lot of progress today. I was doing a happy dance when she jumped over, got the dumbbell, jumped back over and sat in front. That was a huge leap forward in her understanding.

As always... Onward!
 

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Discussion Starter #662
Oh, and the jump folds so I can put it away when I'm not using it. We also did drop on recall to a target mat. Then drop on recall to a small target. And finally drop on recall to a piece of tape on the floor. Noelle loved that. So did I. I'll bring all my targets to my dog training clubs. And we'll bring my targets to drop-in training at other clubs, too. Eventually, Noelle will generalize drop on recall and I won't need a target.
 

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Discussion Starter #663
Turns out negative punishment (P-) is very effective with Noelle. If you jump, I will put the dumbbell away and I will leave. If you do not jump, I will play with you. I only had to do that about five times and she stopped the jumping.

To maintain a stay while I throw the dumbbell, holding on to Noelle's fuzzy topknot worked extremely well. She learned that if she doesn't want her hair pulled, she should maintain a stay. Not that I ever pulled her hair, or actually would. If she tried running, I would let go instantly. But, Noelle didn't know that, so she never ran. I also started out with a strong hold on her topknot, and then gradually loosened until I'm not touching her noggin at all. But Noelle doesn't know that, either!

I still have the challenge that Noelle doesn't like to jump when she is holding a dumbbell in her mouth. I made the jump lower and that helped her get the idea. Her rally jump height is 12 and her obedience jump is 16. 16 seemed a little daunting to my little munchkin. She'll get there. We just need to practice. A lot.

Yesterday, I tied together the spin cue and the sit cue. Noelle did a rocket fast whirl and sit. Well, I'll name that behavior Twirl. I have yet to introduce the go out for Utility, but at least we've got the whirl and sit behavior started. One piece at a time, we'll assemble this puzzle.

Like always, onward!
 

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Yes, there is no reason not to use all four quadrants to your advantage as long as you are fair about it. If we never tell learners (canine, human or other species) what is wrong they will have a harder time understanding what is right in the behaviors they do.


As an FYI virtually everyone I've ever see work on directed jumping does is to teach go out first (without turn and sit) then add the turn and sit. Once you are putting go out, turn and sit, and the jumping together you are limited as to the number of orders you can give. Go out should be just the order to go, no name (i.e. "fly away" then as he arrives at the go out spot "JAVVYS SIT" gets him to turn and sit, then signal and order to the correct jump). I think you may be introducing an extra command by teaching turn and sit as twirl if it is not your plan to use that with her name later on (Noelle twirl). Using the dog's name when they are arriving at the go out cues them that they will be told the next thing to do (sit). I am not sure I am being clear on this, but food for thought. Hopefully it makes sense.
 
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Discussion Starter #665
Yes, it does make sense. I will be yelling, "Noelle, twirl!" because twirl means rotate yourself and sit. Plus, Noelle really, really enjoys twirl as a fun trick. I want her to look forward to the sit part of the exercise. At my last trial, I saw a lot of dogs do a fast go out, sniff the ring gate for a snack, and then wander a bit. I want to avoid that.
 

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The dogs who hoover around looking for crumbs likely were taught to go find the cookie at the go out and not just to find go out.
 
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Discussion Starter #668
We returned to the training club after two weeks off for the holidays. Noelle was glad to be there, but more distracted than usual. I got some snappy heeling that made me happy. I lost her in the corners on the about turns, though. As soon as we get to ring corners, Dog TV turns on. I think there is a switch under the mat. She steps on it, and wow, look at all that interesting stuff to watch outside the ring. Stops to watch... Oh, yes, we were heeling, runs back to catch up with me. Still, I got fast square sits on the halts and she stayed right with me during the turns and speed changes. After a two week break, I was happy with that. We'll work on paying attention during about turns next week.

On command discrimination, she hesitated on the down because she was distracted. Nailed the sit, though. The second time was more smooth. She'd warmed up to the space and was ready to work. Retrieve on the flat went well. What really made me happy was retrieve over a high jump. Well, not so high. She worked with an 8" jump. But, Noelle waited in heel while I threw the dumbbell, ran over the jump, got the dumbbell, brought it all the way back over the jump and sat. Twice! And one throw bounced to the ring gate. I think she's realizing she can jump and hold a dumbbell at the same time. We'll stay at 8 inches and slowly move up the height.

We're on our way, though. Onward!
 

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I’ve stuck at 12” for most of the training In class the teacher had it set at 16”which is Babykins jump height. She took one look at it and ran around the jump instead of jumping. So I’m slowly raising my jump height at home so she’s comfortable with the proper jump height.
wecdod an interesting proofing for dumbbell return.... as soon as we sent the dog to retrieve, we moved side to side a few feet. It was to train our dogs to look for us when they return.
 

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Since we enter mostly the Preferred classes in AKC, I'll practice at 16" before a trial. That's also what he jumps in CDSP. (He stands 24".) His jump height in UKC is 18", so we practice that height before a trial. If we enter a regular AKC class (Open or Utility A, at this point), we'll practice a couple of jumps at his full AKC height, but once he shows willing to jump that, I'll likely lower the height, especially if I practice an exercise like directed jumping repeatedly. In that exercise, I'm more interested in a good go-out and taking the jump he's directed to. I want to avoid repeated full-height jumping ... he'll be 8 years old in February, after all, and I don't want to strain anything. I've heard too many stories about dogs being out of work for months and months.
 

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The only jump I routinely do at the correct distance is the broad jump since there is a different perception of the take off, landing and making the turn. Javelin is a 24" jumper so 48" for the broad jump. I usually put the high and bar jumps at 18". I have no worries about him not making a 25" jump.

I would isolate your about turns for a while and don't practice it just in corners. Abouts are the hardest turns for Javvy so I do lots of work on it in isolation and in all sorts of places in and around rings. You can also take it apart and work on your body cues showing the direction changes so that you are being really effective in your precues. Go at a slow pace and treat at different points around the turn for really good heads up attention.
 

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The only jump I routinely do at the correct distance is the broad jump since there is a different perception of the take off, landing and making the turn. Javelin is a 24" jumper so 48" for the broad jump. I usually put the high and bar jumps at 18". I have no worries about him not making a 25" jump. <snip>
Oddly enough, the broad jump doesn't seem to be a problem for Neely. But early in his career, he wasn't paying full attention to a recall over the high jump (a UKC Novice exercise), crashed into it and the whole jump flew apart. Thereafter, we've had to work harder at getting over that incident. He never had a broad jump "bite" him. As you say, the look is very different.

M
 

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I have to say I've been very lucky with Javelin and these crashes and other sorts of "disasters." He pulled a flexi leash handle out of my hand, it hit the high jump then popped over it and chased Javelin to his dumb bell and got beat up by the flexi. He has also knocked over the high jump and crashed into the bar jump. All of those things are the kind of stuff that would have taken a fair amount of work to get most dogs (Lily included) to return to work at those pieces of equipment, but he has always happily returned to work with those items the same day. I am fortunate he is so resilient and trusts we so well to keep him safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #674
Noelle is learning not to cut the corner off on her broad jump. This week she did it perfectly. I was so pleased that I completely forgot to turn. When she landed, I was in the wrong place. Whoops. We will practice about turns. I need to make that the fun part of the exercise. It's the hardest thing for her. We'll keep practicing. Thanks for journeying with me.
 

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It is really hard to make progress when training in isolation, so even our virtual support for each other really is important, isn't it?
 

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Discussion Starter #676
It certainly is important. We can bounce ideas off each other and help us figure out what to try next. Noelle and I are isolating about turns this week. Remember about turns in place from early novice classes? Yeah, we're doing those. Lots of those.
 

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Javelin and I did lots of about turns today! Lily did all of the variations of rally master jumps too.
 
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Click, were you and Noelle taught to use a cone with the broad jump? Before we even did the broad jump, I taught Babykins to go out and around a cone and then back to front position. This was to teach her to go out straight before turning around to front. Then we added the broad jump with the cone so as to keep jumping straight over the middle before turning to get in front. Babykins learned to jump over straight no matter where I’m located to come in front. This was to avoid her turning while in mid jump and not cutting the corner.
 
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I diddn't use a cone for the broad jump but I did put a piece of house gutter under the 2nd board and over the third board sticking it upward and past the fourth board. Once Javelin understood that he had to jump in extension to land to go around that I reduced it to a yard stick and now usually nothing. He really has never thought about cutting the corner (my good fortune). I generally try to put out as few objects that would require later fading as possible these days, although I certainly use them when I need to and appreciate how they can help the dog understand the exercise.
 
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Discussion Starter #680
I like the go to the cone and around it. That's clever! I worry Noelle would get confused when the cone wasn't there. Noelle tends to combine things in her head and they become stuck together. Instead of jump, go around the cone, find mom being separated into chunks, Noelle would blur it. The cone would trigger the jump. So, I ask for a jump, but there's no cone... Noelle would not know how to jump. I have to be careful what I add into Noelle's training because I probably won't be able to remove it later. I have never tossed a treat over the jump for the same reason. Jump, snorkel the ground for treats, come find mom is not what I'm trying to train.

Right now, I'm standing way ahead of the broad jump so she has to clear the jump, run a few steps and then find front. I'm backing up closer to the jump in stages. She didn't cut the corner the last few times, so I think we're getting there. Also the rally Send to Jump with a broad jump has been helpful. I'm behind the jump so she's less tempted to cut the corner. My trainer says it's muscle memory.

It's all a gigantic puzzle, isn't it? Little behaviors and more little behaviors. I think we have the edges filled in. The middle is still a bit of a jumble. Tomorrow we're doing our first ever Open run-through. We will see what happens.
 
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