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We adopted a 3 year old standard this week. She is the kind, sweet, extremely calm dog. The previous owner decided to give her up because she was too nervous in a busy house when guests came over and she felt badly for the dog. She is great on a leash and will come to us and loves to be loved and doesn't duck when you go to pat her. However, when you call her, she scooches down and comes to you in a full scooching position, even if she is 30 feet away. When we go to put the leash on her, she does the same thing, but walks fine once on a leash. She is also very nervous going through any doorway, Any advice on giving her confidence would be appreciated!
 

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Be patient! She's been through a lot this week. Give her a little room to get used to her new peeps and her new digs. Encourage happy and fun things, but don't push hard.
 
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Lucky you finding such sweetheart.

My minipoo was almost a year old when I got her. I found each week her behavior relaxed and she became less reserved. It took about three months before I saw her full personality. The first three weeks demonstrated the largest change as she got used to our home and routine and we discovered her wonderful personality.

As for the scooch could it have been trained? The first dog trainer I took my dog to taught a recall where the dog came and sat down in front. It wasn’t the formal obedience recall into front position but loosely based on it.
 

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It might not be the case, but the fact that she is scared when she comes to you or is put on the leash leads me to believe she might have been hit when ordered to come.

Some people will hit or punish their dogs when they don’t come fast enough, not realizing they are achieving the exact opposite of what they want. If she has experienced cruelty, it will take a while but once she realizes there is no hitting or punishing anymore when she goes to you, she will stop.

It sounds really strange to me that someone would not want to keep a beloved pet just because it doesn’t like when there are other people in the house.

Please post pictures of your baby if you can, she sounds very sweets !
 

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Yes, it does sound as if she may have been scolded for not coming fast enough, or worse. Busy, impatient humans and a very sensitive dog is not a good combination - dog approaches slowly and carefully, human gets crosser, dog gets slower, human gets even crosser... I have watched it too often.

I would give her time, and as predictable a routine as you can manage. When she has settled in and relaxed you can start thinking about ways to build her confidence further around other people, dogs and the big wide world, but for now I would concentrate on making her home feel very safe, very calm and unfussy. You may be surprised at how she blossoms over the coming weeks and months - I always feel the breakthrough moment is when they feel secure enough to push the boundaries and be just a little bit naughty!

You may find Patricia McConnell's little book on adoption helpful: https://www.patriciamcconnell.com/store/Love-Has-No-Age-Limit-10-2110-12.html
 

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ow nice for you that you found a nice calm poodle. I am guessing it is because she is still so new with you and needs time to settle in. Perhaps giving her small treat when she comes to you will help her feel more comfortable. She probably is still shy since she doesn't know you well yet. Good luck and hope you stick around and tell us more about her.
 

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Another thing to try might be to turn sideways and look away when calling her - our human habit of staring and making eye contact can worry shy dogs until they learn it is not the challenge it would be from another dog. When she has settled in and is more confident it might be worth trying a new cue for recall, if she has learned that the old one might mean Bad Stuff for Poodles.
 

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You will often get an inaccurate story when getting a rescue dog.

If the dog has a collar, you might try putting a harness on him. Sometimes just keeping your hands away from the head/neck is enough to avoid a fear reaction.

I might get one step away from the dog, give him a cue such as "here", or cluck your tongue. Give treat and praise. Walk away. Repeat several times, and gradually get a litter farther away. You teach him the recall, but to a different word and different association.
 
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