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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi.

I'm new to this forum and have a lot to learn. Where my husband was raised with a dog, I was not.

I've read quite a bit about the Poogle and to be honest, there is a lot of conflicting information out there. Enough that I don't know what to think or believe.

I need a hypoallergenic dog and really like the smaller-sized Poodles and my husband just loves Beagles. We've agreed on a Poogle.

We're hopeful this forum can clear up the confusion about the Poogle. Is it a hypoallergenic breed? Does the look vary widely in a litter? How can we be sure we get what we need/want in the puppy from a specific breeder? Breeders seem scarce, why is that?

I look forward to any helpful information anyone can provide.

Thanks!
 

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I would be very wary of a mixed breed. Beagles bay, poodles do not. Beagles roam, poodles do not. Beagles shed, poodles do not. They are both nice dogs, but you don't know what you are getting with a mix. Sometimes, as with a Lab/Poodle mix, the result is nothing like either parent.

No one who is careful of the breeding will breed a mix. They will breed a fine beagle with a fine beagle or a fine poodle with a fine poodle.

Make up your mind.

If you do run across a mix, make sure the personality is right for you and it is healthy. There is no such thing as "hybrid vigor" when mixing dog breeds. If the parents aren't healthy the puppies won't be healthy.
 

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I see where "why don't we just get a poogle" makes sense. Just go 50/50. However, they're scarce because they're not ideal to mix.

It's more common to find hypoallergenic dogs with other hypoallergenic dogs.. not a single with a double coat.

Does your husband have an option #2?

If not, I imagine your ability to breathe is probably higher priority then your husbands need for a beagle, obviously... So.... if happy wife = happy life, then I guess you get your poodle :)
 

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Poogle is not a breed, it is a mix. It may or may not be hypoallergenic, depending on what genes the puppy gets from which parent. You have no way of knowing what the puppy will grow up to be other than approximate size.
 

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Hello, I thought I'd add some insight as someone who suffers from severe allergies myself.

You stated that your family would like a Beagle Poodle mix based on a beagle's characteristics and a poodle's lack of shedding. Unfortunately, as the dog will be a mutt, the temperament and allergy inducing level of the dog will be wholly unpredictable. People who mix dogs usually only have access to very low quality stock, as well as have little to no regard to how well the mix will actually mesh together. The mix could be sired by a particularly nervy poodle, or a dam with hip dysplasia, and backyard breeders never test their dogs for genetic diseases or hip/elbow scans. I once saw an x-ray of a doodle so bad, that its femoral heads weren't even attached to the sockets (hip dysplasia)

Firstly, beagles and poodles are NOT compatible breeds, which is why they are so scarce as mutts. Beagles are notoriously sheddy, which is more likely to pass onto offspring, and badly bred Beagles tend to be very loud and stubborn. Badly bred poodles can be overly sensitive and nervy, and when two low quality members of the breeds combine, it could be a nervy, unfocused, loud mess. Beagles are also hounds, which bay loudly and tend be unfocused when outside due to being slaves to their noses. With two breeds that have completely different coat types, temperaments, and would likely be uncertified for OFA, as well as have low quality stock as parents, this isn't something you want. Heck, I've even had allergic reaction to purebred Poodles in the past, so imagine how much worse that mix would be.

A Poodle really is the best candidate. They are also delightful companions with predictable temperaments and drive. Doodles aren't an industry you want to support, if you need any further assistance on finding a breeder or information on why doodles aren't a good idea, feel free to PM me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I see where "why don't we just get a poogle" makes sense. Just go 50/50. However, they're scarce because they're not ideal to mix.

It's more common to find hypoallergenic dogs with other hypoallergenic dogs.. not a single with a double coat.

Does your husband have an option #2?

If not, I imagine your ability to breathe is probably higher priority then your husbands need for a beagle, obviously... So.... if happy wife = happy life, then I guess you get your poodle :)
I hadn't thought about the mix variant not being ideal. We will certainly have to discuss that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Poogle is not a breed, it is a mix. It may or may not be hypoallergenic, depending on what genes the puppy gets from which parent. You have no way of knowing what the puppy will grow up to be other than approximate size.
Thank you very much for the input.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hello, I thought I'd add some insight as someone who suffers from severe allergies myself.

You stated that your family would like a Beagle Poodle mix based on a beagle's characteristics and a poodle's lack of shedding. Unfortunately, as the dog will be a mutt, the temperament and allergy inducing level of the dog will be wholly unpredictable. People who mix dogs usually only have access to very low quality stock, as well as have little to no regard to how well the mix will actually mesh together. The mix could be sired by a particularly nervy poodle, or a dam with hip dysplasia, and backyard breeders never test their dogs for genetic diseases or hip/elbow scans. I once saw an x-ray of a doodle so bad, that its femoral heads weren't even attached to the sockets (hip dysplasia)

Firstly, beagles and poodles are NOT compatible breeds, which is why they are so scarce as mutts. Beagles are notoriously sheddy, which is more likely to pass onto offspring, and badly bred Beagles tend to be very loud and stubborn. Badly bred poodles can be overly sensitive and nervy, and when two low quality members of the breeds combine, it could be a nervy, unfocused, loud mess. Beagles are also hounds, which bay loudly and tend be unfocused when outside due to being slaves to their noses. With two breeds that have completely different coat types, temperaments, and would likely be uncertified for OFA, as well as have low quality stock as parents, this isn't something you want. Heck, I've even had allergic reaction to purebred Poodles in the past, so imagine how much worse that mix would be.

A Poodle really is the best candidate. They are also delightful companions with predictable temperaments and drive. Doodles aren't an industry you want to support, if you need any further assistance on finding a breeder or information on why doodles aren't a good idea, feel free to PM me.
Oh wow! Thank you so much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hello, I thought I'd add some insight as someone who suffers from severe allergies myself.

You stated that your family would like a Beagle Poodle mix based on a beagle's characteristics and a poodle's lack of shedding. Unfortunately, as the dog will be a mutt, the temperament and allergy inducing level of the dog will be wholly unpredictable. People who mix dogs usually only have access to very low quality stock, as well as have little to no regard to how well the mix will actually mesh together. The mix could be sired by a particularly nervy poodle, or a dam with hip dysplasia, and backyard breeders never test their dogs for genetic diseases or hip/elbow scans. I once saw an x-ray of a doodle so bad, that its femoral heads weren't even attached to the sockets (hip dysplasia)

Firstly, beagles and poodles are NOT compatible breeds, which is why they are so scarce as mutts. Beagles are notoriously sheddy, which is more likely to pass onto offspring, and badly bred Beagles tend to be very loud and stubborn. Badly bred poodles can be overly sensitive and nervy, and when two low quality members of the breeds combine, it could be a nervy, unfocused, loud mess. Beagles are also hounds, which bay loudly and tend be unfocused when outside due to being slaves to their noses. With two breeds that have completely different coat types, temperaments, and would likely be uncertified for OFA, as well as have low quality stock as parents, this isn't something you want. Heck, I've even had allergic reaction to purebred Poodles in the past, so imagine how much worse that mix would be.

A Poodle really is the best candidate. They are also delightful companions with predictable temperaments and drive. Doodles aren't an industry you want to support, if you need any further assistance on finding a breeder or information on why doodles aren't a good idea, feel free to PM me.
Oh my. Like I said, lot's to learn.
 

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Oh my. Like I said, lot's to learn.
Of course! I myself own a backyard bred mix (Shih Tzu x Yorkie), in which those breeds are not very compatible, so I ended up with a very nervous dog that's allergic to many foods. However both Shih Tzus and Yorkies tend to be hypoallergenic, if your husband tends to prefer sleeker dogs, I would recommend a groomed well bred Shih Tzu, they are very gentle and affectionate. I'm very allergic to dogs, but I'm able to bury my face into her hair with no issue.

Poodles are also a big recommendation, very sweet and intuitive, and the Standards are very athletic.
474736
 

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My SO and I also had different opinions about which breed to get. In the end we decided to be practical and go with the breed that is more appropriate for our current livint situation. Which was poodle. But I have promised him that once we have a bigger place we can get his breed of choice (wire haired fox terrier).

The fox terrier is not a breed that I probably would have chosen on my own. They are a very challenging breed. But I will be true to my word and even though its probably around 5 to 10 years before we get the fox terrier I am already preparing for it, reading about their temperament and special grooming.

So now its kinda flipped around. He keeps asking me when we can expect our poodly poo (we are on a waitlist with a breeder) and I am cooing over terrier pictures on instagram! Haha
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
My SO and I also had different opinions about which breed to get. In the end we decided to be practical and go with the breed that is more appropriate for our current livint situation. Which was poodle. But I have promised him that once we have a bigger place we can get his breed of choice (wire haired fox terrier).

The fox terrier is not a breed that I probably would have chosen on my own. They are a very challenging breed. But I will be true to my word and even though its probably around 5 to 10 years before we get the fox terrier I am already preparing for it, reading about their temperament and special grooming.

So now its kinda flipped around. He keeps asking me when we can expect our poodly poo (we are on a waitlist with a breeder) and I am cooing over terrier pictures on instagram! Haha
LOL - That is so funny.
 

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You can also look into the Airedale and Welsh Terriers. I grew up with Airedales and they never impacted my family's allergies. They are smart, affectionate, athletic, but can be stubborn. Depending on what your husband likes about beagles, he might be drawn to one of the terriers.

I loved the research part of deciding on a breed and picturing my life with different dogs. It's such a fun process!
 

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Hi and Welcome!

Mixing two breeds is truly a double barrel genetic shotgun, as members have noted above. It takes generations of knowledgeable breeders and very selective breeding to create a reproducible genetic result identifiable as a separate breed.

Until/unless that happens, the results will be unpredictable. You have different sizes, different physical structure, different performance reasons that the breeds were developed for, different temperaments, different coat types, different heritable health issues...

A quality breeder of purebred dogs is looking at each of those characteristics and more before they pair dogs of the same breed, let alone add in the surprises of another breed. Quality breeders with good reputations in their respective breed clubs will not allow the dogs they've invested their lives in to be bred with another breed. That means that the dogs used in these pairings are not usually going to be of the best quality.

My suggestion would be to learn what a quality, conscientious poodle breeder does to be considered that within poodle breed standards. Then learn what a quality, conscientious ___ breeder does to be considered that within their breed standards, and then hope to find one that does all of that to be able to justify charging the same or more as a well bred purebred, if you commit to the idea of a crossbreed.

You'll find a minimum standard of health testing by breed at OFA, the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals.
Orthopedic Foundation for Animals - Companion Animal Research Center


Browse By Breed | Orthopedic Foundation for Animals | Columbia, MO
Browse our Canine Health Information Center (CHIC) to view disease statistics for various dog breeds. Contribute to the database by ordering a DNA test.
www.ofa.org
www.ofa.org

If you decide that a purebred is something you'd consider, here's a couple of links to do breed comparisons:


Hope you find the right breeder and puppy for all your lives :).
 

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My SO and I also had different opinions about which breed to get. In the end we decided to be practical and go with the breed that is more appropriate for our current livint situation. Which was poodle. But I have promised him that once we have a bigger place we can get his breed of choice (wire haired fox terrier).

The fox terrier is not a breed that I probably would have chosen on my own. They are a very challenging breed. But I will be true to my word and even though its probably around 5 to 10 years before we get the fox terrier I am already preparing for it, reading about their temperament and special grooming.

So now its kinda flipped around. He keeps asking me when we can expect our poodly poo (we are on a waitlist with a breeder) and I am cooing over terrier pictures on instagram! Haha
Be sure you really know about fox terriers before you get one. To say they are challenging is an understatement.
 

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Be sure you really know about fox terriers before you get one. To say they are challenging is an understatement.
Haha dont worry my SO grew up with a fox terrier female. Lets just say that from the stories her temperament was typical for the breed...

Thats my problem. My SO didnt pick the fox terrier for the appearance he really loves their crazy personalities! So I cant just promise him another less intense bearded breed.

In fact one of the ways which I got him excited for the poodle was by showing him a video from the breeder of one of her puppies destroying her rosebush! 🤣

But since he knows the breed he wont get one until the conditions are right. I am not keeping a poodle, gerbils and a fox terrier in a one bedroom apartment! My goodness can you imagine the disaster!
 

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Haha dont worry my SO grew up with a fox terrier female. Lets just say that from the stories her temperament was typical for the breed...

Thats my problem. My SO didnt pick the fox terrier for the appearance he really loves their crazy personalities! So I cant just promise him another less intense bearded breed.

In fact one of the ways which I got him excited for the poodle was by showing him a video from the breeder of one of her puppies destroying her rosebush! 🤣

But since he knows the breed he wont get one until the conditions are right. I am not keeping a poodle, gerbils and a fox terrier in a one bedroom apartment! My goodness can you imagine the disaster!
Pogo used to have a fox terrier friend that was every bit as obsessed with tennis balls as he was. One of Pogo's favorite activities was to steal one of the terrier's tennis balls and stand innocently dangling the tennis ball high over the terrier's head. The terrier would helplessly leap at Pogo's face while Pogo held the ball just out of reach. The sounds of terrier fury would ring throughout the neighborhood.
 
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