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Last Tuesday, March 10th, turned my entire set of daily life routines upside down when my intro students and I all got alert tones on our phones informing us that campus had closed ten minutes earlier and that we should pack our things and go. It was a total surprise for my students, but I had gotten a heads up from my chairperson that the announcement was forthcoming. We cleaned up the lab we were working on and I told them to be careful in the parking lot and on the campus exit roads. For those of you who have been to large sporting events you are probably familiar with the hazards of putting thousands of people onto bottle neck types egress routes.

Myself and a number of my colleagues spent time in our offices trying to figure out what to take with us and to wait for the traffic to die down. Not knowing how long this was going to last when closure was announced it was hard to decide what to take (that was manageable, my texts are heavy).

On Wednesday the 11th I made my stock up (not hoarding) runs for groceries and am very glad I did it then since I beat the weekend rush that happened around me and in many other area. I have really only gone out for milk and a bottle of bourbon since then, both necessities on my list. In Whole Foods where I buy grass fed, organic glass bottle milk I returned some bottles and had a conversation with the coustomer service man hwo took them about how things were going for them. He said they get deliveries every day, but that some items (like my milk) were tending to get sold out early. He suggested arriving by 10 AM to have best availability going forward.

In the meantime the administration at my campus (which is a SUNY community college) decided to simply cancel f2f instruction though the 135h, then pushed that to the 15th and then pushed that out to the 23rd. Technically at the moment my classes are simply cancelled. However I have given a lecture quiz and a lab midterm to my intro class and I am starting to feel like the things I am dong with them are working since they have been positively engaged and have done the work I assigned.

I am having a bit more of a challenge with my micro students. This surprises me tremendously since many of them need to complete this course to complete applications to graduate programs in dentistrly, nursing and such. They did with one or two exceptions submit writing assignments that had the deadline of Monday the 16th and that had been distributed in January.

One of my biggest revelations was the need to make a schedule to routinize my activities as clearly as possible. I tend to procrastinate and when I don't have much going on I am happy to spend the day in pjs. Yesterday BF was off and I he ended up asking me where I was going when he saw me getting dressed. I said I was going to work. His quizzical look was met with my explaining I thought getting dressed would help me stick to my work plans for the day. Now I also see the need for scheduling specific time frames to work on creating, distributing, receiving and evaluating assignments for each class. I also will schedule specific times to disseminating and having discussions with students on new topical material.

It is a hard set of conditions to adjust to. I am alone almost all of the time. There are many temptations to not stick to what needs to get done. Knitting calls out tom and poodles are mugging for attention at the worst moments. I also know this will not end soon. We have been asked to cancel summer courses that cannot be offered in an entirely online environment (which essentially means I will have no summer work, don't ask what that will cost me, very depressing). The campus committees dealing with all of this are also apparently making contingent plans regarding the resumption of f2f instruction for the fall as well. I wonder whether I will return to work in the current calendar year.

How have things changed for you?
 

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Yes, things have changed majorly for me. I just started a new job last month, and now I have no job to go to. I don't know how long this will last, and not having a job to go to right now is hard. I miss working with the individuals I serve. Hoping people get tested, treated, and return to health very soon.
 

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Dogs4Life that does sound really rough. BF just started a new job 2 1/2 weeks ago. He is a bike mechanic and teleworking obviously is not a possibility. Since Gov. Cuomo has ordered that businesses not have more than 25% of employees an site at any time we are witing for the boss to tell everyone they will be have thier weekly scehdules cut down.
 

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I am fortunate - I am retired, live alone, and my routine has mostly revolved around house, garden and dog walks for long enough that this is a very easy transition. The biggest problem is going to be getting anything at all done as all my friends and relations discover Facetime, Skype and all the other methods of contacting me for long chats! We are setting up group coffees, and 6pm wine - my sister decided some years ago never to drink alone, and the prospect of months of total abstinence was rather daunting, so we have agreed online company counts as not alone. So the new routine may end up more convivial than the old - I can see myself edging off to bed leaving my computer chatting...
 

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My husband's and my daily routines have changed very little, but they FEEL different. And I'm trying to be accepting of that rather than pushing for normalcy.

He's an artist and works from home. Usually he'd work most mornings at his favourite coffee shop, but I asked him to put that particular routine on hold back in February. Now he'll sometimes take the car to the beach and work there with his iPad and a thermos of coffee.

He's had one big job cancelled so far—a restaurant who understandably must cut expenses for the time being. I expect there will be more, as he works largely for musicians and cancelled tours will inevitably mean cancelled merchandise.

I left my career years ago due to chronic pain and illness, and my daily "check-ins" with myself have taken on new weight. While most would see a fever right now as a possible sign of the coronavirus, it's rare that I don't have a fever, so monitoring my temperature has been stressful for me: Is this a normal fever or a FEVER fever??

I find myself getting increasingly chatty to cope with the stress. My husband's been the opposite. I suspect many relationships will be challenged in the coming days.
 

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Our two adult children seem to be in contact daily now - it was a few times a week before. But since our daughter is an ICU nurse, I won't be able to see her face to face until this is over. So we're doing long phone calls on her days off. She's extremely stressed about possibly losing so many patients. And she's worried about her own survival. Believe me, I am too.

My husband and I have quiet days centered around walking Normie and our usual exercise routines. We both read a good bit and have been watching British gardening shows at night to relax.

Best of luck to each of you.
 

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Dianaleez I for one and probably many here will hold your daughter's health high in our thoughts.
 

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One small change, I started this morning, was to read the online version of The Houston Chronicle ahead of WaPo and the NYT’s. To my delight, I learned that the governor has okayed liquor delivery, previously prohibited, and the DPS is closed except for first time driver’s licenses. No need to worry about an expired license for now, or replenishing wine at some point. Microscopic anxieties in this setting, I know.

I’ve been retired for a while, and a dog has always given structure to my days. Buck is pretty bossy about his schedule. A big change, I’ve made is to agree to stay home. DH says if he has to worry about me becoming sick again, it will be too much for him. I was sick for two weeks recently, I talk to my best friend in Maryland everyday and check in with other friends and family more frequently. Just because you’re not with people, doesn’t mean you have to feel lonely.
 

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I'm lucky, in that I was already set to work from home. My previous job role was 100% work from home, and my current job requires the occasional off-hours video call.

I realized this week that, without consciously doing so, I've created separate physical and mental spaces for work and non work. Work happens at my computer desk. Non work happens on the couch with my tablet. At my desk I have a good monitor, my work laptop, my keyboard, my mouse, an adjustable chair, and a headset. I sit down with my cup of tea in the morning and immerse myself in email and documentation for a couple hours. Eventually I get up for a break. I get a snack, take the dog out, throw a load of laundry in, whatever. Then I go back to work. At the end of the day I turn off the laptop and leave it on the desk. Work is done. I pick up my tablet and start web surfing, chatting with family, etc.
 

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Would it surprise ya'll I am still going to work? There is no one there save my bosses and one engineer, it's my choice so I go. We had our weekly meeting, 19 attended Online.
If you think I am doing things willy n nilly I pretty much go from a to z, scope out crowds if I have to do something. I picked up my taxes no one there save three employees in H & R when I went, same when I picked up prescription dog and cat food.
I've told to stay away from my brother's, he just got back from Chicago last week. I would have gone over for my sister in law's birthday today.
I am a bit stir crazy because I have been self isolating since flu season hit hard in January, and having to keep Pia quiet post neck injury, she is officially off resting so yippee. I can now start home projects like painting, already have the paint.
Well stocked on stuff, no puppies though.
I refuse to panic about this, life happens.
 

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This is a rather big change for me to be working in solitary at home. I am having a hard time with it in many ways, but I am adjusting. BF is still going to work and he gets to have live conversation with people wo are in his presence even though they are 8-10 feet away. I do spend time alone during class intersessions but at those times I am free to go places but not now. I think BF doesn't understand that this is very different for me and that the prospects of this lasting for months is daunting.
 

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Dog shows are cancelled now, so I can't go to any, but I can still email and call breeders. My 2 younger brothers are always home now, we can only go outside to take Sisko out. We're really bored and stressed, but we're all going to be learning some new things, and one of them is learning French?.

I'm not sure how long it will be until my mom and older brother are told to stay home. We didn't get a puppy either
 

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I miss my old routine. I had a very busy schedule between different dog sports training classes in various dog training facilities. I have so many friends from all over that I’m used to seeing that I won’t see until this is over. All my volunteer activities are canceled. I’ve gone from driving all over and activities day and evening to nothing and staying at home. Texting and emailing friends and family.

DH is working at home now and I’m thankful he has this option. I do have a small concern that he may be called if there’s a shortage of medical doctors but he doesn’t see patients so he doesn’t think he would be called.

I’ve significantly reduced my physical activity so I have to be more active. DH and I are taking hood walks when it’s not raining.

All non-essential business is closed. People are to stay home. I’m thankful I have a comfortable home and we’re well stocked. We are keeping far apart from others.

I am fearfully of this virus. I’ve had mild bronchitis for weeks and I have autoimmune diseases so I’m at greater risk for a serious reaction.
 

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I’m working from home indefinitely now, my husband is retired so we can do the social distancing without worry. My workday is very busy with constant phone calls, Skype, Zoom meetings- much related to issues with the virus. I’m feeling more drained than usual at the end of the workday because there’s an underlying anxiety in all my virtual interactions about this virus, and so much planning and pivoting to alternative plans.

I an a nurse but it’s many years since I’ve worked clinically. Right now I have my hands full with this administrative job and will do what I can behind the scenes to support the effort. I am getting urgent solicitations in my email looking for RNs, and the pay is five times the going rate in this area. I am very worried about our health care workers, and the ability of our health care system to handle this.

In the BS and MS programs at my college, our students are already RNs and many are reporting having to work extra hours and having difficulty keeping up with school work. Some have reported being ill. Of course we are flexing policies, and creating new ones to accommodate them. Our adjunct faculty are also nurses and many are involved in direct patient care. One person who is a public health nurse has been deployed to the epicenter, and reported working twenty hour days. One person reported having to set up tents outside her clinic in 30 degree weather to accommodate the increased numbers of patients.


I too miss my dog events but we’ll use the time to do some independent training. Gracie’s first trial was going to be next weekend so that is off, which is disappointing, but in the grand scheme, just a small blip...or at least let’s hope it’s a small blip. Stay well everyone, and if you know a health care worker, thank them for their commitment!
 

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I spent all of yesterday arranging online schooling for my youngest teen. My oldest daughter is a senior, just 2 classes from graduation. She is in a holding pattern with her high school. I’m pushing her to sign up for online class with our community college, but she resists. She thinks her school will restart.

I am still working. I do direct patient care three days a week. I’ll be right back at it in 4 hours. It is a bit terrifying right now, but most days I love my job. I just don’t want to be part of the chain of infection, and it is stressful.

Meanwhile, Violet has developed a cough- like she has something stuck in her throat. My husband will be taking her to the veterinarian today, and I won’t be able to be there. I don’t like the idea of handing her off at curbside.
 

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I work at an online college so for most part, we can continue instruction. We do have students who need clinical experiences for graduation and have had to postpone some experiences, nothing we can do about it. In some courses, we were able to create a virtual option.

I know that traditional institutions are really struggling, It’s a tough one, particularly for programs that require labs or clinicals. You can’t always do a virtual option, the accreditors demand a certain amount of face to face and not all learning activities should be virtual. You can’t just put a traditional program online overnight, and you can’t expect faculty to immediately be comfortable with online teaching. I hear your frustrations Lilycd, and I know my former colleagues in a f2f setting are having a hard time. I’m not sure how the public schools are faring with this. There just wasn’t time for any of us to create a well thought out plan.

Every day this crisis escalates, it helps to be able to talk about it. Stay safe all of you, particularly those on the front lines, thinking of you Newport and other health care workers and emergency personnel who are so essential now.
 

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Together (even if only in VR world) we will rise. Carolink I appreciate your comments about moving from f2f to remote education. Obviously our admin wants courses moving along, but it is going to be bumpy. We finally indirectly heard a genuine acknowledgement that they know and appreciate how hard we are working.

And clearly for all amongst us who are directly care providers themselves and those who have loved ones working in the efforts to deal with this extreme situation we all hold you up.
 

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Fever and layoffs. My daughter's three day fever appears to be gone, and without tests we'll never know if she had a mild case or not. That was a big worry. My son got laid off, then my daughter put on telework but that may not last long since the company is on thin ice.

Belly Bands & Errands. When I did venture out on some errands, I wore two belly bands velcro'd together to make a face mask. At the post office, the clerk didn't bat an eye, and he work gloves just take packages. At the drug store, the short story is one of the cashiers looked like she was a day or two days away from hospitalization but claimed she had allergies, and a customer told me I looked stupid with my homemade face mask and said the media was exaggerating the problem. She was joined by two other customers who agreed on both points. I found this bizarre since schools are closed in my area; initially until Apr 3rd, today expanded to Apr 24th. My cashier thought they were idiots and looked like she hated being around her sick coworker. I felt sorry for her that she had to have that job and they weren't allowed to wear face masks.

The Primal Brain Hates A Famine. At the grocery store my intention was to buy maybe a dozen needed items, but something primal hijacked my brain after seeing all the other customers stock up like a famine is coming, and I ended up with a cart full of food. The staff lady who helped me unload my groceries into my care ranted the entire time about coughing customers and how the entire country needs to shut down everything like China did.

Riddle: What The Heck Does Covid-19 Have In Common With Your Electric Company? Once home, I cooked the fresh meats and poultry and stored in my freezer. I've never done that before, but thought if there's a blackout along with the epidemic, maybe cooked frozen meat might last a little longer than raw meat.

Yeah, it's irrational. Maybe hearing over and over on the news that "We're at war with coronavirus! It's the new bombs and bullets!" sank into my subconscious, although my rational mind doesn't really expect it to bomb our utility companies which would affect our refrigerators and stoves.

Daily Routine

I've concluded that we're headed for The Great Depression 2.0. Adjusting to that upcoming reality along with the high possibility of losing one or more beloved family members is the hardest part of my daily routine.

A dear friend suggested I take a day off from all news and the Internet every now and then to have a normal day. Isn't that a wonderful idea? Every single doggone day the news and the new normal is not good for one's mental health or spirit.
 

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I am hoping that the adjustment will actually be good for us - most of us can cope with a lot less than we have, and reducing our impact on the planet by forcibly curbing our rampant consumerism may be hugely good for it and for us. And if we can hold on to the surge of kindness and community that has emerged all around the world that too would be a blessing. The world has been reset and will never be the same again - scary, but also exciting. All those politicians and tec entrepreneurs who wanted to break everything and see what they could build with the pieces are getting exactly what they wished for, and discovering that it is not as easy as they imagined - it is for us all to try to ensure that what they create is a political and social and economic world we want to live in.

And to be kind, to ourselves and to others. Which at the moment means biting the lip at the stupid idiots who are not taking this seriously and keeping both them and ourselves as safe as we can by being careful...

Our family Happy Hour on Skype last night was a great success, so we are making it a weekly event, together with weekly Skype coffee on Tuesday mornings. I suggested 9am - the rest decided 11am was a more suitable time for them! One friend, after staring at herself on screen for half an hour, has decided she is not doing it again without time to put on her make up and do her hair, which has always taken her hours and made her feel infinitely better about life.
 
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