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We currently have a 11 month old female toy Poodle. Gracie is her name and she stole my heart early on and continues to be my baby girl. My wife and I decided to add to the household by adding a new 10 week old male toy. Gracie has not responded well to the new addition. I’ve read that it usually is a 3-4 week transition. Gracie growls, jumps on, and tries to repeatable pin the little boy. Is this a normal transition?
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Welcome to you and your poodles! Armful of adorable much? I have only had one dog at a time, so can’t help on the transition from interloper to hopefully bestie or simply tolerated.
 

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Your Gracie has stolen my heart! What a cute girl. I'm sure she'll get used to her new little friend, and eventually actually appreciate his presence. But puppy energy can be a LOT. So I understand her desire to take control of the situation. Does she have a quiet place to retreat to, out of the puppy's reach?

I think quite a few people on this forum have introduced puppies with great success. They'll undoubtedly have wisdom to share with you.

I did it only once, almost 14 years ago. My female mini mix Gracie was maybe a year old and she was horrified by Tucker, the interloper. She'd wait on the couch until Tucker walked by and then pounce on his back (and, in fact, continued this behaviour throughout Tucker's entire life, poor guy). But they were buddies within a month or two, and loved to get into trouble together. And she never played with another dog the way she played with Tucker.

BUT.... and I'm going to be honest here....Tucker eventually ended up moving in with my retired parents and Gracie was happy to have me to herself again. And whenever Tucker would visit, she'd play with him and have a great time, but she ALWAYS peed on the floor. So I don't think I did a very good job managing their introduction. If I could do it again, I'd do a better job continuing her routine. I let her graduate from a crate to my bed, for example, while Tucker used the crate. In retrospect, this was probably a terrible idea.
 

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Welcome - your babies are both adorable.

We have two miniature poodle pups - Willow, 19 months old, and Kiki, 5 months old. Kiki joined our family in September, between the age of 8-9 weeks old. We had the opposite issue - Willow was very intimidated by the puppy (at first), and baby Kiki was overly playful/bullying with Willow. We carefully supervised their first few weeks' interactions, and made sure that Willow got plenty of cuddles and reassurance. About 2 weeks in there was a sudden change of dynamics, and Willow and Kiki started playing well together. They are very bonded now, and play very energetically - with delicate, 9lbs Willow often being "top dog," even though 5 month old Kiki is comparatively a moose - she is very sturdy and already past 15 inches and 15 lbs (her dad is a Moyen from a European line).

I think that careful supervision and balacing the different needs of both pups is key to successful integration. We did have be (gentle but) firm with baby Kiki and not allow her to aggressively nip Willow (or us) - she was very mouthy (but has learned not to be).

Your new pup is tiny and very delicate, so you'll want to make sure Gracie doesn't accidentally harm him in the first few months. Gracie will need to know she hasn't been replaced and is still your "special girl."

Good luck with your babies! Two poodle pups are a handful, but wonderful. Gracie is just about the age they start to mature and settle down a bit.

Warmly, --Nicola


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Welcome to the forum and congrats on the new puppy !

it takes a lot more than 3-4 weeks for stability to be reached when you add a new pet. It can take up to 1 year for everyone to be fully adapted, although it shouldn’t take that long in your case because both your dogs are young.

There are special steps you can take to make the transition easier. The golden rule : the dog that was in the house first should stay top dog. Meaning, he gets the treats first, attention first, he gets fed first, ect. This is to avoid unnecessary jealousy and so your dog doesn’t feel like he lost it’s place. The puppy is new, so he won’t know the difference.

For a while, also, try not to make too much of a fuss of the new puppy. Stay calm and pet both dogs calmly. Avoid that high pitch sound that will arouse both the puppy and Gracie.

And most of all, enjoy it while it lasts ! :)
 

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Your Gracie is beautiful, and the pup looks very cute.

Be patient, introduce gradually, keep the puppy separated unless you can closely supervise.....and give Gracie lots of extra attention. Her world has turned upside down right now. It sounds like the pup is too much h for her, which is normal. Let her observe him from afar for a few days, then gradually let them interact.

I recently introduced a puppy to three older dogs and it has gone reasonably well. As Dechi said, keep the existing dog in the top dog position, and keep the puppy safe. It’s hard on the existing dogs, puppies are annoying.

My new puppy is named Gracie too. She was 8 weeks when she arrived, and came to a household with three other dogs, aged eight, nine, and ten. I put an ex pen in the living room and for the first few days, that was how they got to know her. Then I started gradually letting them interact with close supervision.

All three dogs had different reactions. Lily was thrilled with her and played right away. Her play was gentle, and they have continued to play well together and are often together throughout the day. Max clearly thought she was too much and initially worked hard to ignore her. Misty, who I think secretly wants to be the only dog, kind of glowered at her from afar and let her know in no uncertain terms that Gracie was not to invade her personal space. And Gracie, being a poodle, learned that lesson quickly! No bloodshed, Misty just gave her stern corrections.

All this was fine and manageable. Gracie was a whirling dervish as a young pup, so cute, but so busy. As time went on, Gracie learned better manners around the older dogs, one of them being that propelling herself across the room into Misty’s space was not a good idea.

If properly managed, older dogs can provide good guidance for puppies. Gracie is now 13 months and the entire pack has gelled quite nicely, and I think they have all had a positive affect on Gracie’s socialization. Gracie is respectful of the older dogs and now that she’s not as much a whirling dervish, her and Max play together regularly. Even Misty will once in a while get playful with her when they’re running around the yard, but for the most part, she ignores her and they peacefully co- exist. That all works.
 
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Here’s a pic of Gracie in her expen set up. You can get expens on Amazon for not a lot of money, but your local pet supply place probably has them too. I also liked those soft interlocking pads for the floor of the expen as they protected the floor and were waterproof and soft for Gracie. I included a pic of products on Amazon, like they say a picture says a thousand words.

The expen allowed the other dogs to see and smell her, but didn’t allow Gracie free reign. Your older dog needs to know that you have her back, and will protect her from puppy craziness that is clearly making her uncomfortable right now. Using an expen was an important part of managing that first year for us. I still use it, although it’s in a bedroom now. Gracie goes in it when we leave the house because she still chews things.

Let us know how it goes!
 

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I don't know how we managed before our Frisco x-pen (available from Chewy), which we keep attached to Peggy's crate. Her water is always in her crate, mounted up off the ground, and we feed all her meals in the pen. It's been a real sanity saver and an excellent training aid. I can see how it would provide additional benefits in a multi-dog household—giving the older dogs a break, keeping food and toys separated, providing a quiet place for puppy to retreat, etc. It's also THE BEST for housebreaking.

As you can see, Peggy does not mind hers one bit!

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For a small breed puppy the Iris playpen can work well. Indeed it is what I am using for my mini who is 16 weeks old. It is smack dab in the middle of my living room where she can see everything. Sometimes she is in there with the door closed, sometimes not. It is a safe place for her to be if I need to confine her for a bit because I can't watch her, and she takes naps in there. At night she sleeps in my room in a wire crate.


I use it with a washable whelping pad underneath, but our potty training has gone well and she doesn't go in her playpen. Here is the link to the whelping pad I have:


I also added a top to mine (a piece of plastic lattice fencing I bungeed to the top). Sometimes puppies/dogs will climb out of pens, and I wanted to prevent that.

This system has worked really well for us, and helped manage a puppy around two older dogs. As has been said, puppy behavior/energy is frequently very annoying to older dogs. Separation and management can assist with creating a happy household. I liked Carolinek's description of her mini as a "whirling dervish"-- pretty much describes my Violet a lot of the time. I'm expecting my black tornado will have increasing moments of calm as she grows up; they are already becoming more frequent. My older dogs find her much easier to be around when she is calm.

I should mention that I also use a leash to limit her loving harassment of her older brothers. For example, this morning while I drank my coffee at the kitchen table Violet was on a leash that kept her within 4' of me. One older dog came to visit her, and the other did not. This puppy management technique is called tethering. It is just as important in our house as a playpen and a nighttime crate in managing puppy behavior, potty training, and helping both old dogs and young dogs get along. I don't expect to have to do this forever, though I do plan to have Violet sleep in a crate at night forever (unless health needs dictate otherwise).

Your two pups are really lovely. I'm glad you came to Poodleforum asking questions. I hope you will stay and share your poodle adventures!
 

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It may be that Grace is simply trying to show him his place in the pack - she's above him in rank.
Mama dogs hold down pups, growl, and even nip them to demonstrate dominance.

As long as you supervise their interactions, they should work things out.
 

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Hi all,

Two puppies yay !

We have Harry who is 13 months and just got George who is 8 weeks, both Toy poodles. Harry is Chocolate and George is Black. We are using a pen area for George to retreat too. We are also finding that Harry is super excited with George, and George initiates play most of the time, but Harry pushes/pins him down and mouths at him. So at the moment George is mostly in the pen with some supervised interaction and we are using a lot of positive reinforcement for both pups when they just walk around nicely together. Reading from above this supervised play will have to continue for quite some time before Harry becomes used to George being around all the time. We just need to make sure Harry doesn't accidentally harm George because he is so so tiny.

But we are very excited for these two boys to bond and become lifelong mates.
If anyone has any other tips they would be greatly appreciated for us too !

Harry is well socialised and has 3 Tpoodle friends that he sees often, one of whom is his half sister.

:)
 

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You should congratulate yourselves that he feels comfortable in 'his' room. He could be pacing or howling or tearing up his toys. It sounds to me as though he's adjusting - and this quiet time may be just what he needs. This smaller space may make him feel safe. I'd leave him where he is.

It sounds as though his luck has made a turn for the better.
 

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You should congratulate yourselves that he feels comfortable in 'his' room. He could be pacing or howling or tearing up his toys. It sounds to me as though he's adjusting - and this quiet time may be just what he needs. This smaller space may make him feel safe. I'd leave him where he is.

It sounds as though his luck has made a turn for the better.
Was this perhaps intended for the schnoodle thread? If not, good advice for them!
 
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