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I got my standard poodle a week ago. We are struggling with potty training outside of the crate and crying when he’s left in the crate. I make sure he has gone to the bathroom before I crate him and he isn’t hungry. He is fine at night when I’m in bed (I keep his crate in my room) but if he can’t see me, he freaks out. Is this normal? I’m working from home right now due to the virus but I will have to return to work eventually and I’m nervous for that transition. I’m taking him out every 2 hours and limiting his water (per the vet while training) but he still pees in the house. Any tips appreciated!
 

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How old is he and how did you introduce him to the crate? Does he have yummy treats or stuffed chew toys to enjoy in there?

It's easy to forget that we need to teach puppies all things, and one of the most important things is how to self-soothe.

Here's the best guide to housebreaking:


Follow it carefully and you should see some progress. And please don't restrict water. That is not necessary and (I believe) rather cruel.
 

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He is 9 weeks old today. I have his toys, a blanket and I feed him in his crate with the door open. His breeder said he was crate trained when I got him but I think he had litter mates in there with him. He doesn’t seem to like the treats I bought him so I’m looking for new ones but I’ll use his dog food when I reward him. I guess I shouldn’t say I limit his water. I give him water throughout the day and then take him out but he seems to still have to pee a lot and it’s usually in the house. Thanks for the article.
 

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Aw. Just a tiny baby with a tiny baby bladder. Have patience and start jotting down the timing of his accidents. That will help you tailor a potty schedule to his needs.

You'll be going through lots of treats as you train him, so I wouldn't bother with the expensive processed ones. Buy a few chicken breasts, boil them, cut them into tiny pieces, and freeze them. Ta da! Healthy, tasty, cheap treats.

Then buy a puppy kong, put a tiny swipe of peanut butter in there, some kibble, and a few pieces of the chicken, and then place it in the crate. He can go in and get it with the door open, but if he tries to leave, the door closes while you wait patiently. As soon as he stops whining or pawing the door, the door opens again. Repeat, repeat, with kindness and patience, until he's happily settled with his kong. Now you're teaching him that good things happen in his crate and what's expected of him, and he's learning that he's never rewarded for making a fuss.

P.S. That wasn't an article I shared, but rather a whole wonderful book, and it will arm you with all the knowledge you need to get puppy on track. Much more in-depth than any advice you'll get here. Read it tonight and get started tomorrow. :)
 

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Hi there! Congratulations on your new puppy!
I second reading and following the book PeggyTheParti shared. It’s one I read and found very helpful for when I brought home my puppy at 8 weeks old.
Your baby won’t likely be mostly housebroken until 6 months old. It will definitely take time and patience (and a good enzymatic cleaner).
I just want to say, very importantly, please ensure your puppy has access to fresh water 24 hours a day, whether in crate or not. I’m surprised the vet would recommend that. Dehydration happens easily to puppies, and water is much more important than Food. As long as you let the dog out right before being crated for the night and the crate space is small enough where there isn’t a way to pee without soiling the sleep space then there will not be accidents in the crate.
Id recommend attaching a wire ex pen to the crate on an easy to clean floor and use that as part of potty training and settle training. They’re wonderful.
Also, it’s totally normal for puppy to bark and cry when you’re not in sight. Just practice being out of sight for longer and longer periods. You can also set up an extra phone or tablet and use a camera app to watch your puppy and see how long it takes him to settle down.
 

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Everything that everybody else said above is excellent information with the add on caveat that it is developmentally impossible for most young dogs to have the neuromuscular ability to resist the urge of bladder and bowel pressure even though they are likely to understand the house breaking concept much earlier. Be very careful to do this calmly and patiently since to be stressed over it can lead to sneaking off and eliminating out of sight which then is a really challenging issue to fix. Tether your pup to you when he is out of his crate so you can be sure he isn't sneaking off to eliminate indoors. Observe carefully for signs the pup wants to relieve himself. These signs can be very subtle. For example Javelin never said anything about wanting to go. He would just stand near the door to the backyard. If I was near him (tether) then all was good, but if I was in the basement doing laundry I am sure he would have gone, but if I was in the basement doing laundry he would have been in his crate.

As to the tantrums in the crate you need a little kindness (cover the crate with a sheet) to send a message that it is appropriate to be quiet since there isn't much to do. You need to combine that with a bit of tough love (a nice chew toy in the crate should provide some calming signs) in that if the pup cries you have to ignore it completely and be prepared to reward bits of quiet, but certainly go peak if the pup sounds really distressed like they stuck their foot out and can't figure out to get themselves unstuck.
 
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