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Discussion Starter #1
Hi;

We are new here to the forums.
Wife and I are excited at our new young standard poodle.
We are used to dogs and recently lost a 14 year standard poodle to old age. We had "Coal" since birth.
Our new 4 month old female dog "Georgia" is sweet and smart but will not go outside. As a matter of fact she does not go for 24 hours or so! She will go in the house and of course that is not desirable.
We have tried walking her with a leash in a designated area, timed her feedings, encouraged her to go by praising her and giving her treats when she does good. We recently let her loose in the backyard and she did pee once... and was rewarded. Seems she is bent on using the house as her bathroom.
Frustration is building so we thought we would reach out the the Poodle Community for advice.

Thank you for your input.

Regards; Joe and Erin
 

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Welcome. There’s plenty of people here with experience toilet training who will be able to help you.

Is your dog fussy about texture of surfaces? I had a tpoo many years ago who didn’t like walking on grass. When she went potty she would walk on the driveway or walk, step an inch or two onto the grass to potty and then immediately jumped back onto the solid surface. I didn’t have trouble toilet training her and she was a summer puppy who played with my kids on the grass so I don’t know why she had this odd behavior.
 

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Has she been trained to go on pads or paper perhaps? If so, moving the pad a little closer to the great outdoors every day, and having another outside may help. You know, of course, not to make a fuss when you catch her in the act - the last thing you want is her being afraid of peeing or pooing when you are watching!
 
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I agree with fjm about moving her "indoor potty surface" closer to outside gradually as one great way to make this happen. Another way (recommended by Ian Dunbar) is to bring the outdoors in by putting a piece of sod into a tray and placing that into your pup's extended confinement area (ex pen).



You also have to make sure that you don't give your pup the opportunity to make mistakes that turn into habit. If you are not directly interacting with her Georgia should be in her crate. Puppies are very averse to soiling their den and this is why the crate is so important to the housebreaking process.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks to all that responded. We have had "Georgia" for 5 days. No such change in her habits thus far. Seems to me that the dog will get sick if it does not go. She has not had a BM in over 24 hours. Rarely drinks any water and when does it is a small amount.
The dog appears to want to play and is happy on the grass. We do make time for her and encourage her to interact with us. She appears happy and is much less timid wince we have all got to know each other.
There has been no paper training or confinement to a cage, at least not yet.
We realize this will take time and patience is best.
We made some changes today, such as feeding her twice a day rather then having her bowl full of dry food. (She never ate much anyway).
Rather than try to walk her we will let her run free in the fenced in yard.
Will keep you all informed. Any more advice is appreciated.

Regards; Erin&joe
 

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Hello and welcome ! Congrats on your new puppy.

To help with housebreaking, she should never be left to herself in the house. Either crate her if you are too busy, and for naps, or have her on a leash, tethered to you.

Don’t walk her, let her go outside every 2 hours, after play, after eating and before naps and bedtime. Use a command word while she does it, so she learns to do it when you want her to.

To help her understand she needs to do it outside, spend most of your time with her in the yard, playing with her and giving her water to make her go. Have a comfortable chair and just read or relax while she is doing whatever she wants. Keep an eye on her and say the command words while she is going, and praise her profusely as soon as she is done. Then go back in the house for a while, then back outside max 2 hours later. This needs to be done in the rain also, unfortunately.

No freedom for missy in the house, that’s the most important rule, unless you want to still be doing this in six months.

Also, make sure she has just enough room to stand up and turn around in the crate, but not enough to soil in one corner and sleep in the other corner.

Good luck !
 

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You should soak her kibble to make it easier to eat and to help get some water into her. She may be dropping some deciduous teeth at this time and that may be putting her off her food. Give her 15 minutes to eat it and then take it away. This will help her to learn that meals are meals and that she shouldn't pick at her food.


Why aren't you using a crate? This is a critical time to do so. A teething puppy will destroy things if left unsupervised. Additionally although a 4 month old puppy may very well understand the concept of not pottying in the house they are not neuromuscularly well developed enough to resist the urge to go when they feel pressure of a full bladder or bowel.


Since you have only had Georgia with you for a short time this is the time to establish good habits for the crate, eating, pottying and other essential life skills. She is probably still adjusting to her new surroundings but that doesn't mean she should be allowed to do whatever she wants to. She needs some structure in her environment and clarity in your expectations of her to help her settle in.
 
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Knowing that she is 4 months old but you've only had her for 5 days makes a difference in the advice.

The bad news is you have to toilet train her as if she was an 8 week old puppy that you just brought home. Dechi mentioned some of the things you have to do. You have to work hard at this stage, follow the rules. She can't be allowed to potty in the house. If she does, you must understand that it's your fault that you allowed her to potty in the house.... it's not Georgia's mistake that she is being not being trained properly. Clean up potty messes without any fuss, no blame on the dog, no berating or yelling. Use enzymatic cleaners everywhere she has pottied to help remove the smells that you may not notice, but her sensitive nose will - after all if there is a potty smell it can draw her to go potty there again which you want to avoid. Always take her outside on a leash - you need to monitor and reward her for every success. Use a command such as "go pee" while she is peeing and reward profusely - eventually she will understand she has to pee when you say that. Same with poop. By watching her closely you will also learn her signal to you that she has to potty.

The good news is that it won't take long - she's older and will learn quickly. It's critical to avoid all mistakes so she will learn quickly what to do. Once you get a handle on the potty outside, then you can slowly allow her more freedom. But do it slowly - she may have learned that she isn't to poop in the kitchen, living room and bedroom, but she may not realize the basement or dining room is part of the no-pooping zone we call house. Same with taking her to visit someone else's house or other buildings - she has to learn no to potty in other buildings. It doesn't take long, but you have to train potty everywhere that is new until she fully understands.

The best news - you're close to that magical time when not only does your dog understand the potty rules, but their neuromuscular control of the bladder which occurs around 6 months of age will mean she will be able to hold her pee and poop like an adult dog that she is becoming.
 

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I agree with Skylar and Catherine.

About taking her on a leash outside to potty, if you have a fenced yard, you need to see what works best. Some dogs will take a lot longer if you put them on a leash. Test that part and do what works for you.

I had Beckie at 4 1/2 months old, not toilet trained, and I would let her go without a leash in the yard. That puppy was really hard to train, you can read about it in my posts. She had such a small and immature bladder, she was like a 2 months old. It took me almost a whole year. All dogs can be housebroken, that’s the good news. Also, bigger dogs are usually easier than small dogs. So chances are your puppy will be much faster than mine was !
 

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Welcome! Repeat the mantra, “no mistakes inside” and accept that it’s on you if they happen. Buck was not a fan of his crate as a puppy, so he was restricted to the tile of the kitchen and hall where cleanups were easy. Every success outside got treats or a praise party. Poodles love it when you’re happy:) I would lift a 4 month old out the door or guide him out and then stay until mission accomplished.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks to all. Today has been better. She went outside twice and was heavily praised and rewarded. She is drinking more and eating better as well.
Will continue to use the tips and techniques that you have all graciously advised.

Again..thank you all!

Cheers; Erin & Joe


Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

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Hmm..When I first get a dog I immediately put them on a schedule.
6 am outside on leash to potty, come in eat, play, then potty, then crate. rte should only be big enough for them to lie down and turn. If they did not potty I just keep repeating by taking them outside every 30 minutes. When they do a treat & praise, Some pups I've had like excitement while others do not so I play it out. I repeat this all day and at 4-5 pm I feed again repeat until bed. Sometimes it takes about 3 weeks. To me it sounds like your pup just hasn't settled into your home yet and is frightened a bit of the new environment. Personally I would not train a standard to go in the house period on... anything. I also would not allow her freedom in the house and would keep her tethered to me until she gets some sort of schedule. Once she does then I give more supervised freedom so I can scoop them outside if they start to potty. But thats me and how I do it. And welcome to the forum.
 
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