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Hi from NJ. I just had my 70th birthday, and we just lost our 16 year old Sheltie. I have wished to own a poodle for a while but our dog was blind and deaf for a few years, and never liked other animals So of course we did not bring in a second dog.

I have health issues ssues along with age..
I have had multiple back surgeries, cannot walk far, have some other issues.
I can walk slowly a short ways, and have a small mobility scooter I can ride.
My husband is a couple years younger and healthy, and our over 30 youngest lives here now.

the genesis of poodle desire is our “granddog”, a mini goldendoodle. Beloved by all, had his own invites to gatherings prior to Covid. Sweet lapdog, loving, gentle. Came from questionable southern breeder who sent dog north to owner. So seemed to me he is 3/4 poodle, why chance a doodle when I can find descent, knowledgeable poodle breeders.

we do have two cats and poodle do seem to tolerate cats if trained.
we had one or two dogs from 1970’s to now and i forstered dogs for our local rescue. Mainly crate training to housebreak puppies and dogs one at a time. Lots of experience with dogs but that was mainly pre surgeries.

I would assume I should find a breeder and wait til next year to buy a puppy, since all seem to have a waitlist.

thoughts on age, health and dog ownership, breeds?
 

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I think you would do best with a toy poodle. Are you willing to take an older dog instead of a puppy? If so, be sure to let each breeder you contact know that - I think an older toy poodle would make you a wonderful companion.

Wathung Mountain Poodle Club has a person who does breeder referrals in your area. It is: Angela Spitaletto. Her email is: [email protected]. The phone numbers I have for her are 973-827-2107 and 212-423-9295.
 

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I think you sound like someone who should have a poodle. :) That was very kind of you to let your sheltie live her later years in peace.

I agree that a toy would probably be best. It won't take much to meet his or her exercise needs, and I'm sure you would enjoy a clever little lapdog. The only issue you may encounter is with your "granddog," as toys can be quite fragile. But he sounds like a lovely little boy who will respect his new Aunt or Uncle. ;)

There is a great deal of demand right now for puppies, so yes, you probably would want to get on a waitlist as soon as possible.

Have you done any research yet? Any breeders catch your eye?
 

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I have had multiple back surgeries, cannot walk far, have some other issues.
I can walk slowly a short ways, and have a small mobility scooter I can ride.
My husband is a couple years younger and healthy, and our over 30 youngest lives here now.
I don't see any deal breakers here, at least for not for toy breed. We have many senior citizens here and I'm close to being one myself. I have two toy poodles, rarely take them outside, so they use these potty pads from Chewy. The ones that are 22x23" are the perfect size, and a pack of100 will last one adult toy poodle for 100+ days. My brother, who is nearly 80, just got a West Highland terrier pup. The advantage of getting a toy poodle is they weigh 4-1/2 to about 7 pounds and are lightweight to carry. Also there's evidence that dog owners live longer.

You also have husband without mobility issues and your 30 year old adult child, so you're good to go. Get a puppy or older dog, doesn't really matter although if you find a nice older one that's housebroken, that's a lot less bending over for you in cleaning up accidents.
 

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Hi and Welcome!

You'll find yourself in good company here, and with a poodle as a future companion. I'm a member of the Medicare club and DH and I found ourselves with two miniature poodle boys after we lost our two miniature girls only a few months apart. The house was just too quiet and we had all that love waiting to share again. DH and I don't have the level of challenges that some of our members live with but our poodles seem to adapt. We have members who walk theirs while riding a mobility scooter, so it's doable.

A toy will need less exercise and would be easier to manage physically but there is a consideration of size and potentially being slightly more fragile. DH and I loved our girls size but hoped for a slightly smaller poodle. We didn't want so small that we'd be afraid of causing injury, tho. We ended up with almost exactly the same sizes. I'm guessing that part of why Johanna and PtP suggest the toy is for the physical exercise needs. Mini's have a reputation of being the energizer bunnies of the poodle world. I can only say that that came as a surprise to me with 7 mini's in my lifetime.

A quality breeder is generally going to breed for the standard, so I'd think most toys are going to finish out around 8"-10" and mini's at 13"-15". Genetics being occasionally unpredictable, both toys and mini's occasionally go oversize by 1"-2" in their variety.

I also second considering an older pup or young adult. Our girls came to us at 1y 9m old and they were perfect for us. We didn't have the puppy phase, so we didn't have those experiences and memories, but we feel no difference in the bond.

With your experience, it sounds like you know to look for breeders who do the genetic testing and other exams before breeding.

Let us know how we can help in your quest!
 

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I agree I don't really see anything that would be a big problem. It's true an older dog would probably be better, but the right puppy shouldn't really be much of a problem either. I myself am only 35yrs old but I'm physically disabled (problems with my legs) and I have a wonderful almost 1yr old Mini pup. Beau is calm and easy going, and relatively low energy. He does just fine with me and my limitations. So puppies like that do exist :).

My favorite Great-Aunt was a very dog savvy woman, and she had dogs well into her 80's. In fact she still had her last dog when she passed away, a middle aged American Eskimo who went to live with her neice.
I think as long as you and your husband/family are prepared and able to handle a dog it should be OK.
 

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Hi from NJ. I just had my 70th birthday, and we just lost our 16 year old Sheltie. I have wished to own a poodle for a while but our dog was blind and deaf for a few years, and never liked other animals So of course we did not bring in a second dog.

I have health issues ssues along with age..
I have had multiple back surgeries, cannot walk far, have some other issues.
I can walk slowly a short ways, and have a small mobility scooter I can ride.
My husband is a couple years younger and healthy, and our over 30 youngest lives here now.

the genesis of poodle desire is our “granddog”, a mini goldendoodle. Beloved by all, had his own invites to gatherings prior to Covid. Sweet lapdog, loving, gentle. Came from questionable southern breeder who sent dog north to owner. So seemed to me he is 3/4 poodle, why chance a doodle when I can find descent, knowledgeable poodle breeders.

we do have two cats and poodle do seem to tolerate cats if trained.
we had one or two dogs from 1970’s to now and i forstered dogs for our local rescue. Mainly crate training to housebreak puppies and dogs one at a time. Lots of experience with dogs but that was mainly pre surgeries.

I would assume I should find a breeder and wait til next year to buy a puppy, since all seem to have a waitlist.

thoughts on age, health and dog ownership, breeds?
I also think you should have a poodle and due to your health issues I would think a toy or a mini, would be a good size. I'm near your age and have a standard but I'm healthy other than my knees which are manageable. I would look at an older dog that is already housebroken as a young puppy can be a lot to deal with. My daughter lives at home and has a young shih tzu puppy, he is rather easy as he is p/pad broke so I don't have to take him out while she is at work however we are now taking him out and he is learning, but will occasionally use the pad. He is small and doesn't really have control over his bladder yet. Good luck and I'm glad to see you have a recommendation for a dog. Think you will give him/her a wonderful life.
 

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I’ll give my personal input. I have 2 toy poodles and health issues. I do my own grooming, bathing, nail cutting. These two will be my last poodles. They just require too much work. Even if I wasn’t doing all the grooming myself, I would still have to take them to the groomer at least every month for nails and every six weeks for a groom. Doing the work at my own pace is still better than taking them to the groomer for me.

Also, they do require exercise, even when small. My male doesn’t require much, but my female is a bomb and needs exercise. Both love being outside and playing. I think it’s best to have a yard for them so they can run and play, even if you can’t walk them (which often, I can’t).

My next dogs will be Yorkies or Chihuahuas, which are a lot less work, especially the Chihuahua. And they don’t require as much exercise.

I do love poodles though and if I could, I would get a standard poodle. Or have more toys in the future. But they definitely are one of the breeds who require the most care, and are probably on top of that list !
 

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I am a long time toy poodle owners my 7th is three years old now. I adopted three poodles as adults, and have had 4 puppies. What you seeking is an easy keeper, my boy who is 3 now was the only one who wasn't raised around my elderly mother.
Poodle puppies aren't for everyone, they can be tiring, being busy minded can get into trouble and do.
I have chosen my puppies based on temperament not on sex or color.
As for being too old, my only consideration is what will happen to the pup/dog if something happens with you.
I inherited my mom's pomeranian chihuahua mix and she was a handful, Gracue the chi mix is 15 years old now.
 

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I think there are a number of questions everyone should ask themselves before getting a dog, regardless of age or physical capability, including:

Can I afford to meet this dog's healthcare, grooming, etc?
Can I ensure the dog will get proper care and exercise if I should be temporarily incapacitated?
Who would take over should the worst happen and I was no longer around?

Then it is a matter of choosing the best fit for your home, family and circumstances. I would think a large toy would be ideal for you yourself, but your son and husband may prefer a bigger dog. Are you up for the 12-24 months of intensive effort required to raise a puppy, or would a well-socialised adult be a better fit? Or do you have the skills and patience to rehabilitate an older dog that has not had the best start?
 

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Just my $0.02... consider the size poodle that you can bath in the kitchen sink full grown to avoid bending over for the inevitable "you need a bath" moments.

My parents are in a similar boat and my 6mo old 35# standard poodle is great tempurment wise, she's just physically a lot of puppy... I would advise against a larger breed dog if possible.
 

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My neighbor who is early 80 adopted a standard last year. His wife is about 10 years younger. But this dog came from a rescue who first fostered him and he has been obedience trained. Its a good fit for them. However they have a large fenced in yard and the dogs regularly go to a groomer.
 

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If your son wants to walk the dog, then I don't see why you can't have a standard. However, I would opt for a grown dog, at least a year old, that has decent manners and will not jump on you. You might prefer a calmer personality, so ask for that. If a standard seems to big for you, I would go with a miniature rather than a toy.
 

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We are 79 and 87 years old. We have four dogs: Lab, whippet/border collie cross, miniature poodle, and Chihuahua. They range in age from the poodle, 3 years old, to the border collie/whippet who will be 15 in January. I am considering a whippet and/or a standard poodle in the future. Although I am 79, I am in excellent health and pretty active, so adding another large, active dog seems reasonable. That said, I will be looking for an adult, not a puppy.
 

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Johanna, We too have 3 dogs at the moment. St. Poodle, cairn terrier and shih tzu puppy. We also had a boxer but lost him this past Spring to a brain tumor. I'm not opposed to getting another St. Poodle but watching for the right one who will fit into our home. Not entirely against a puppy but would prefer a young adult. My parents especially my mom use to say you can't give in to ailments you must always push yourself so as to not allow them to control your living. I think that way of thinking keeps many of us going. I have young neighbors who complain about everything, they have this allergy or that so they can't do this and so on. My husband hooks up to his dialysis machine every night, has improved his labs work and is now generally healthy with the exception of mobility. We are working on that.
 

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I think Johanna's post sums up my experience too. It's not age, it's health. (I'm a healthy active 75. - I keep thinking that can't be right. 75? Even my grandma shouldn't be that old!)

Keep in mind that having a puppy is as much about patience as physical abilities.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for all the wonderful feedback. We are going to start our search for a new dog. Search may be long unless we find a rescue, or an adult needing placement. I am Finding legit breeders of any breed are booked through mid to end of 2021, due to at home jobs and covid issues. All adult dogs placed too.
Will look first for young adult dog. Nervous but positive feelings about this search.
we have had miraculous good luck with our dogs. Of course the stolen food, aveeeno powered covering the living room, kitchen cabinet doors pulled off hinges all are funny stories eventually!

also just an aside but I am fairly sure backyard breeders/dog brokers, puppy mills are all on petfinder. at least their products are, imho. listing as rescues. I see multiple litters of Small popular mixed breed (beagle/pug, chihuahua/jack russell etc) “ found in Texas as strays” and brought here to NJ. As in 10 to 30 or more puppies a month per each group. I do not want to support a puppy mill situation.
 

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Good luck in your search. Stay in touch to let us know your progress. In my few years here, I've seen more than a few serendipitous encounters, so stay positive :).

also just an aside but I am fairly sure backyard breeders/dog brokers, puppy mills are all on petfinder. at least their products are, imho. listing as rescues. I see multiple litters of Small popular mixed breed (beagle/pug, chihuahua/jack russell etc) “ found in Texas as strays” and brought here to NJ. As in 10 to 30 or more puppies a month per each group. I do not want to support a puppy mill situation.
As to this, it's certainly possible that less than legit folks are setting themselves up as rescues and displaying them there but I'd think the parent organization, Nestle Purina Petcare, would be against that as bad for business. One way would be to check what the adoption prices are. Puppy mills don't usually sell puppies or dogs for rescue prices, and when I was searching daily a few years ago, it was almost universal that home visits were required by the rescue before adopting out. There will be websites and FB pages too. Things may have changed since I last looked regularly.

I'd definitely avoid places like puppyfind.com, puppyspot.com, craigslist or kijiji ads "rehoming" 8 week old pups, those sorts of places. I'd also say to do your full homework for listings on the AKC marketplace, really anywhere, to be certain of who you're potentially getting a poodle from.

Another thing to be aware of, if you don't already know, is that a breeder mentioning that they are licensed by their state/USDA, only means that they are running a higher volume business so they must be licensed by law. Higher volume breeders are not inherently bad, it's just a bit more homework for you to do. Socialization of puppies is a usually given concern.
 
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Good luck in your search! And you are right to be suspicious of those sorts of "rescue" groups:


:(

Even the legitimate ones will often downplay behavioural issues in order to place their dogs. An acquaintance is having to go through the heart-wrenching experience right now of returning an aggressive rescue. She was told he'd been "rehabilitated." Not many of even the most loving, committed dog owners have the skills or resources to tackle cases like that.

All that said, I believe the right dog will find you when it's time. :) My parents' last four dogs have pretty much fallen in their laps when they were ready for them. And they've all been absolutely wonderful dogs.

If you do go the waitlist route, that will be such a nice thing to look forward to! Time will fly by.
 
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