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Hi all I am new here, and we are getting our first poodle in 4 weeks (moyen). We've been very excited as a family as we have not had a dog for a few years, we have 2 children aged 3 and 5 and I've read up 1000x that they are great family pets.
But then opinions have come along. I keep getting comments that they are aggressive and I should be careful with the kids. So now I am flooded with doubt and fear. I have friends that have poodle mixes and they are lovely dogs but I have had experience with an aggressive dog (not poodle) in my past and it has taken me a long time to move on from this which is why I felt ready to adopt now but I feel I have been put back in my place from years ago with the comments.
I am here basically wanting some positives from real poodle owners that this is breed bashing cos I am having my doubts now and we are so looking forward to having a new family member but I just feel like I have been shot down with my confidence again.
Thanks a lot
 

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Welcome. :) Poodles can be protective, but they should NOT be aggressive.

If you've done your research, and are confident in your breeder, you can rest easy. Poodles are playful, sensitive, and intelligent, and can be wonderful with children if carefully chosen for your household (ideally based on early temperament testing) and properly handled and socialized. An excellent breeder will support you through the challenging puppy months (okay, let's be honest - years) and will be there for you if any worrying temperament issues crop up.

But!

If you're truly having second thoughts, now is the time to dig deep and ask yourself if this is the right time for a puppy. Maybe your gut is trying to get your attention.

Poodles do require a lot of attention compared to some other breeds. And their sensitivity means that you'll want to keep your household as mellow and stable as possible. If my energy shoots up, so does Peggy—literally! Straight up into the air! And, until fairly recently, her teeth would join in the fun.

This could be challenging with little ones at home. Just something to be mindful of. If your children want a playmate to roughhouse with, that's asking for trouble. But that's going to be the case with most young dogs.

I've leaned heavily on the folks at Poodle Forum since bringing Peggy home last summer, and they've been a real lifeline. So feel free to bring your tough questions, your silly questions, ALL your questions! We've got you. :)
 

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Thanks so much for your response!

I think my gut will be slightly against me from past experience. But I dont think ill overcome that without getting back on the horse. I've had dogs my whole life with no issues and one incident has scarred me for years and only up until recently I felt ready to bring that joy of a dog back into the home. So obviously now its crushed me a bit and I'm quite angry at the comments.

I have a lot of time to give now which is another reason for the decision. My kids are in school and I work only part time and we live in a wonderful area next to so many great walks which I do on my own so I can definitely fulfill an energetic dogs life 🙂

The kids are pretty calm in this sense, I have girls who spend most their time just playing with dolls 😂
I also plan on doing puppy training to get socialisation implemented, depending on the current lockdown situation.

So all in all I was ready for this and our choice of a poodle, but have been thrown a lot of negativity at me, being told by people that they were surprised I chose this breed! I havent a whole lot of experience with poodles at all apart from friends cockerpoos and doodles which is why I rushed here for help x
 

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Welcome to PF!
I agree with Peggy that poodles are not aggressive, or I have never run into one that is. As long as they are well socialized they make excellent pets. Just when you get the puppy be prepared to tether it to you or leave it in a play pen or in its crate. They should not be left unsupervised.
 

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Cockerpoos have a reputation for resource guarding, shared by cocker spaniels, but I don't think it is considered a breed trait in poodles. I think a lot of people had bad experiences with poodles years ago when they were extremely popular, and there were a lot of badly bred, poorly socialised dogs were around. A carefully bred, carefully socialised poodle is an excellent family dog - you don't say what size you are getting, but do take care how puppy and children interact. Small puppies can be easily hurt and become fearful, while big puppies can accidentally hurt through sheer exuberance. I am sure you have already started to explain the puppy's needs to your daughters, but watching some of the videos about dog body language together might be helpful - something like I speak doggie, depending on age,
. And involving them in planning the puppy's timetable may help them to understand that just like babies puppies thrive on routine and lots of rest.

All puppies have sharp teeth and claws; all puppies chew precious toys and other things and are prone to nipping hands and feet until they learn better; all puppies pee and poo in all the wrong places. Being well prepared for these things is half the battle!
 
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I have never met a poodle that was nasty/aggressive, protective yes (Javelin guards my car when I am in it) but not mean.

That said a good temperament evidenced by success in conformation and performance sports in the pedigree, testing of the puppies done early on and the observations of a good breeder to help you make a decision all will make for a lovely life with a wonderful family member. Make sure you enlist your daughters in helping with training so that pup grows up respecting everyone's orders as important. This will reinforce the innate genetics and early environmental experiences to realize the best development to adulthood.
 

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Rest assured that any comments on aggressive poodles were not made by people who knew well bred, well socialized dogs. Poodles can be excellent with families, but I would say that as puppies they can be extraordinarily mouthy. Some more than others. When mine was little I used to hide up on the couch where he couldn't reach me to avoid his dagger teeth. But he grew out of it. If you have a good responsible breeder they will help to pair you with a puppy that will be a good fit for your family. And if you have met or meet the parents, you will get a good idea of what to expect from your puppy's adult temperament. Puppyhood is a wild ride for the whole family. Having the kids participate in training will help a great deal.
 

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You lot have massively helped me thank you so so much!! I'm so glad I came here my confidence is back to where it was before the negative comments already 🙂 and that video is fantastic thanks so much for that!! Mum is a standard and dad is a minature and our boy is looking more like small standard size.

What would you recommend basic tips and things for a new poodle pup owner that's different to other dogs? I have only ever owned greyhounds in the past!
 

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You lot have massively helped me thank you so so much!! I'm so glad I came here my confidence is back to where it was before the negative comments already 🙂 and that video is fantastic thanks so much for that!! Mum is a standard and dad is a minature and our boy is looking more like small standard size.

What would you recommend basic tips and things for a new poodle pup owner that's different to other dogs? I have only ever owned greyhounds in the past!
The biggest difference will be in grooming which doesn't just mean taking your dog to the groomer every 4-6 weeks. It means that when they're a puppy, you need to introduce them to and train them for accepting the grooming process. It's not always easy. And then especially as they're growing up, they need frequent brushing to keep them mat free. Bathing a poodle is also much more work than bathing a slick coated dog. Some people don't bathe their poodles and just let groomers do it. You'll want to get the basic grooming equipment like a slicker brush, pin brush, greyhound comb, and a good coat spray. If your breeder is good, they will have started the pups learning the grooming process beginning at 4-5 weeks of age, and they will show you the methods they use to get the pups used to it. Even if you prefer fluffy faces and feet, it's recommended to keep a clean face on puppies for the first year so they get used to the grooming process. Though many people become attached to the clean face look and find they prefer to keep it.
 

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Greyhounds are delightful, but I don't think anyone would claim that they are the brightest of dogs. As adults they tend to be couch potatoes - a walk, a sprint, and back to reclining. A poodle, especially when a puppy, needs occupation, brainwork, and regular exercise. They are usually highly intelligent, and can get bored and frustrated by repetition and drill working. If it is some time since you have raised a puppy the Ian Dunbar free books are highly recommended: Dog Training Digital Textbook I love this approach to raising a puppy, too: Life Lessons For My Puppy - eileenanddogs
 

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Mum is a standard and dad is a minature and our boy is looking more like small standard size.
You've met both? And have they been fully health tested?

And will the breeder be temperament testing your pup to ensure he's a good fit for your home?

Because of your worries (well-earned from past experience) I'd just recommend you ensure all these bases have been covered.

Our Peggy has had a funny streak since we first brought her home. She's genius and loving and gets along well with adult humans and dogs of all types, but there were red flags I missed. And we've had to put in a lot of extra work to help counteract some breeder issues. (Her sire, for example, was really just a baby himself. I didn't know this. I didn't know to ask. How could they have full confidence in his health? Or rule out behaviour issues that might emerge in later adolescence? And Peggy's always been nervous of children, despite being frequently handled by them before we brought her home...or perhaps because of that?)

This isn't meant to increase your anxiety, but rather to encourage you to channel it into doing your due diligence.

I would never get another purebred dog again unless it was temperament tested and from champion lines. If were to gamble like that again, I'd rescue a shelter puppy.
 
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