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New Cat/ Existing Standard Poodle/Possibly Territory Marking?

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I’ve introduced a new member to myself and Bo the dogs (family member). The introduction went very well. No real barking or chasing. The cat has assumed the alpha role. I believe as a result, he’s establishing territory where spends the majority of the time. My schedule with him has not changed. In the morning I find 💩 and 🚿. Nice gift. I let him know that this is a bad or no and bring him over to disaster site, ground zero. After I show it to him I mention outside.I always mention outside for a walk with walk. I compliment him when he goes outside. Bo is 18 months.

my question is how long will this process take and any other thoughts you have, please and thank you.


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Is it Bo or the cat who is marking?
I personally wouldn't make a big deal about the marking. 1) It's more likely due to anxiety rather than dominance. Making a big deal has the possibility of backfiring by increasing the anxiety. 2) Most animals will struggle to understand the connection between their toilet activity from earlier in the day with your concern now. Again, confusing the animal is likely to backfire by increasing the anxiety.
I would definitely invest in some enzymatic cleanser. Use a carpet shampooer if the marking is occurring on carpet. If Bo is the one doing the marking, I would keep him on a leash or in a confined area to minimize his chances for sneaking off to to leave deposits. Give him lots of cat free attention time, and play training games with him. If the cat is the one doing the marking then I would give the cat one room as his territory for the time being. Let him settle there for a few weeks.
 

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Bo 6 mths
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks so much. Bo is the dog. He has a new person with her cat establishing the dominant role. I do give attention. It sounds like he needs more. Will do that.

Thanks again!
Brook
 

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Ah, that's actually good news. Dogs are easier to retrain than cats when it comes to inappropriate marking. Definitely don't shame him for marking. He's a smart dog. He will figure out there's a problem simply by watching you clean the spot. First you will haul out paper towels and a bottle of cleanser. He's a poodle; I'm sure he will curiously watch you scrubbing and will follow you back and forth as you take the soiled towels to the garbage. He will think about what's going on. Then his sensitive nose will endure a few hours to a few days of unpleasant (to a dog) floral scents coming out of the freshly cleaned spot. I think this level of correction is plenty; he's probably not going to figure things out any better with more hardcore shaming.

If he continues to have inappropriate toilet episodes then you might want to set him up with a vet appointment. I would have recommended a vet appointment immediately if you didn't have the explanation of new cat and new person. Any time a dog suddenly starts behaving badly and out of character it's always important to rule out a medical cause.
 

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Also - make sure you are praising profusely and preferably adding a food reward immediately after successful outdoor elimination. Being a good dog who pees and poops outside, means great things! Immediacy is key. Just like several hours later the dog is unlikely to understand cause and effect of you being upset about a puddle, giving praise or food when the dog comes in, rewards coming in, not the peeing or pooping that went on in the yard or on a walk!

For most dogs, a food reward is WAY more valuable than praise.

I had an issue for a bit where my dog decided to go out before bed, not produce anything, come in, get her treat (I wasn't watching her, because she was a long house trained 3 year old dog! ), go to bed, and then in the middle of the night decide she needed to go out!

Simply supervising the bedtime excursion, treating after successful elimination, and then going in, solved that problem basically instantly.

You may also want to add some sort of confinement when not watching or at night. If Annie hadn't been in my bedroom when she started ignoring the last pee of the night, I suspect I would have been waking up to morning puddles instead of waking up in the middle of the night because my dog needed out.
 

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And - here's a link to Dr. Dunbar's housetraining guide, which explains how dogs think far better than I ever could

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
And - here's a link to Dr. Dunbar's housetraining guide, which explains how dogs think far better than I ever could

Yes, you’re right and I have. Although his well beyond my training. He’s house broken. I brought in woman and her cat. From what I’ve read from others on this site it maybe do to anxiety. Nice way to get attention. I think they’re right. Maybe throw in a little territory issues. I think he’ll get over it. It’s a pretty big adjustment for him. If not, I’ll be back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you for your interest’s. We have stepped up the positive attention for Bo. He is, yes a little hyper. From what I understand, some are and some not. He’s also 18 months old. He’s got a lot of puppy in him. But, I have him trained to the extent of looking for his ball by naming the room. He’s house trained. Fairly good on the leash. When confronted by an aggressive dog I can either snap my finger and point down or command him. He’ll sit and look at the other dog while it’s going nuts. It took a training to get him to relax and sit and watch; he does it very well. Most of the time, I get apologies from those owner’s that lack training skills and or the patience to train them properly. Bo is also very comfortable in the big dog park. A lot of experienced owners at that park. The dogs pack up and run and play. Several acres of a fenced in environment with trees and grass. We also monitor what’s going on and don’t tolerate aggressive, angry behavior. As a result, dog fights are very rare.

long story short, I do believe he’s asking for attention and has some anxiety and showing it through his little gifts. I also think there could be a little territorial example too. He’s very cautious with the cat to the extent that the cat shows alpha tendencies. Initially, it was Bo and I.
 

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Good advice above. I wouldn’t be relying on praise at this point. You want to be giving the most delectable food rewards for peeing and pooping in the correct spot, offered right under Bo’s nose as he’s finishing. A new animal addition is a big change for an adolescent poodle. Lean heavily on positive reinforcement to build up his confidence and get him repeating the behaviors you want. Continue this even after he stops having indoor accidents.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Good advice above. I wouldn’t be relying on praise at this point. You want to be giving the most delectable food rewards for peeing and pooping in the correct spot, offered right under Bo’s nose as he’s finishing. A new animal addition is a big change for an adolescent poodle. Lean heavily on positive reinforcement to build up his confidence and get him repeating the behaviors you want. Continue this even after he stops having indoor accidents.
Sounds like little more reinforcement for what he’s learned. Can they actually go into a different pattern with a social change?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Any change can throw off a routine or create anxiety that leads to accidents or pottying in the wrong spot. New smells, too.

Scolding for these incidents can make a dog afraid to potty in the presence of a human, increasing the chances of poos and pees being done where they shouldn’t.

Here’s a good overview:
Mission accomplished. Thanks to you and my cronies @ Poodle Forum.!
 
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