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Discussion Starter #1
So I just got a poodle puppy and I have been thinking about showing her. I have been doing a lot of reserch and I see a lot about show banding poodles. I cant seem to find the reason why you do that but it would help a lot if someone could respond. Again, I know it has to do with the Hair but what exactly does show banding do to a poodles hair.
 

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Yep, it's all about tying it back to minimize tangling, breakage, and to allow the dog to "be a dog" without worrying about all that hair. It only stands up like you see in shows if it's prepped with the right products, and so it's not a look anybody is going to keep up with on a regular basis with the dog. So it's easier to band the hair during all the down time.
 

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Did you buy your dog as a show prospect ? That’s condition number one.

I’m asking just in case, because it‘s not obvious, but you can’t show a dog that doesn’t come from show lines (you could try, but you would be wasting money because it wouldn’t have the right physical attributes).
 

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Did you buy your dog as a show prospect ? That’s condition number one.

I’m asking just in case, because it‘s not obvious, but you can’t show a dog that doesn’t come from show lines (you could try, but you would be wasting money because it wouldn’t have the right physical attributes).
Well my main goal is to breed her and um I'm only 13 so ig I didn't know that but from what I can tell I have went over the akc official standard of a poodle which is what she is registered under multiple times and I believe that she could win idk. I was just gonna try it out , I thought it would be fun and my mom don't wanna spend a lot of money on a poodle because she breeds Australian shepherds so don't think I could buy a poodle that has a showing line. so thank you for telling my lol but I have to start somewhwere right ? well either way thank you for telling me I just might reconsider showing.
467287
That is her by the way
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Maybe try showing UKC to start and get experience? UKC allows a few less high maintenance cuts so you can learn about showing without some of the hair stress.

Gladstone's poodle grooming book has some discussion of poodle show grooming, but I dont know much about show grooming as I dont show
thank you I will look into that :)
 

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Well my main goal is to breed her and um I'm only 13 so ig I didn't know that but from what I can tell I have went over the akc official standard of a poodle which is what she is registered under multiple times and I believe that she could win idk.
It’s wonderful that you are so young and eager to learn ! I really encourage you to find a mentor to help you learn about the breed and particularly what dogs should be bred and why and all the necessary steps before you can decide whether or not to breed a specific dog.

Breeding a dog is easy, but breeding to better the breed is a whole different matter, and only very educated people can achieve it. We do need good, ethical poodle breeders who will breed poodles according to the standard but it can’t be improvised.

Since you bought a pet dog, you won’t be able to show her in AKC but as others have said, UKC or junior showmanship is a possibility. Junior showmanship at AKC would be the best environment to learn about breeding from experienced breeders. And find a mentor, someone who would be willing to pass on their knowledge and know-how.
 

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Hi and Welcome to you and your cute pup! What variety is she?

Before you think of showing, which can cost a great deal, find a breeder who shows in your area and see if they might mentor you. They can also assess her to see how close she is to the breed standard. Also, as things open up eventually, go to some shows to get the feel for poodle competitions.

Before you think of breeding her, I'm assuming that you would want to be considered a good, conscientious breeder. That includes genetic health testing to make sure you are breeding to make poodles healthier. Did the breeder you got her from do the genetic and other health testing on her sire and dam?

Here's some resources for you to look into

RESOURCES

Poodle Club of America - Look up local or regional clubs for breeder referral. A good resource for a lot of information

Illustrated Breed Standards

UKC

AKC

AKC Registry Lookup - by kennel name or dog name or registry number

Health Testing Criteria - Parents Are Tested Not Puppies - Additional Testing

Toy Minimum Testing Criteria
prcd Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) DNA testing from an approved laboratory
Eye clearance by the Companion Animal Eye Registry (CAER)
Patellar Luxation OFA evaluation

Miniature Minimum Testing Criteria
prcd Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) DNA testing from an approved laboratory
Eye clearance by the Companion Animal Eye Registry (CAER)
Hip Dysplasia evaluation from an approved agency
Patellar Luxation OFA evaluation

Standard Minimum Testing Criteria
Hip Dysplasia evaluation from an approved agency
Eye clearance by the Companion Animal Eye Registry (CAER)
Plus Health Elective (At least one of the following tests):
OFA Thyroid evaluation from an approved laboratory
OFA SA Evaluation from an approved dermapathologist
Congenital Cardiac Exam
Advanced Cardiac Exam

OFA Lookup - by kennel name or dog name or registry number - Orthopedic Foundation for Animals

Poodle Health Registry database

Poodle Pedigree Database

Versatility In Poodles
Its primary purpose is to improve the health and promote the many talents of this remarkable breed.

Poodle History Project

Buying A Puppy Safely
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hi and Welcome to you and your cute pup! What variety is she?

Before you think of showing, which can cost a great deal, find a breeder who shows in your area and see if they might mentor you. They can also assess her to see how close she is to the breed standard. Also, as things open up eventually, go to some shows to get the feel for poodle competitions.

Before you think of breeding her, I'm assuming that you would want to be considered a good, conscientious breeder. That includes genetic health testing to make sure you are breeding to make poodles healthier. Did the breeder you got her from do the genetic and other health testing on her sire and dam?

Here's some resources for you to look into

RESOURCES

Poodle Club of America - Look up local or regional clubs for breeder referral. A good resource for a lot of information

Illustrated Breed Standards

UKC

AKC

AKC Registry Lookup - by kennel name or dog name or registry number

Health Testing Criteria - Parents Are Tested Not Puppies - Additional Testing

Toy Minimum Testing Criteria
prcd Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) DNA testing from an approved laboratory
Eye clearance by the Companion Animal Eye Registry (CAER)
Patellar Luxation OFA evaluation

Miniature Minimum Testing Criteria
prcd Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) DNA testing from an approved laboratory
Eye clearance by the Companion Animal Eye Registry (CAER)
Hip Dysplasia evaluation from an approved agency
Patellar Luxation OFA evaluation

Standard Minimum Testing Criteria
Hip Dysplasia evaluation from an approved agency
Eye clearance by the Companion Animal Eye Registry (CAER)
Plus Health Elective (At least one of the following tests):
OFA Thyroid evaluation from an approved laboratory
OFA SA Evaluation from an approved dermapathologist
Congenital Cardiac Exam
Advanced Cardiac Exam

OFA Lookup - by kennel name or dog name or registry number - Orthopedic Foundation for Animals

Poodle Health Registry database

Poodle Pedigree Database

Versatility In Poodles
Its primary purpose is to improve the health and promote the many talents of this remarkable breed.

Poodle History Project

Buying A Puppy Safely

She is a red standard poodle, and yes like with the dogs my mom has I will be testing her for any diseases that poodles could have. I wont be breeding her and taking care of all the puppies by my self all time my mom will still help me as I help her with the puppies that she has but I will be doing most the work. We do a thing called puppy culture on all our puppies which involves us doing exercises with each puppy to better the dog in the future for the breed and for the owner. Thank you very much for sharing these links I will look at all of them :)
 

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You might look into 4-H dog groups in your area. They can help you learn how to show a dog as well. Might be helpful to get you ready before trying Junior Showmanship. Taking care of poodle show coat is an art form. You should see if there is a poodle club or all-breed kennel club in your area. See if your mother will attend meetings with you. You can meet poodle owners who might be willing to mentor you and teach you how to maintain and groom your puppy. If you are willing to work hard and learn, they might invite you to help them with their dogs. If you prove yourself, over time, they might even trust you with a well bred dog to use in Juniors. You have to be willing to get to know people and prove that you will work hard, listen and learn about the breed, and be trustworthy. It's exciting that you are interested. Do your best to find a show person who is willing to help you. Good luck
 

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I don't think anyone yet mentioned getting connected with nearby dog clubs (AKC or UKC) to see if they have handling classes. Usually the leaders of those classes have shown multiple dogs and could be valuable mentors in the sport.

I also didn't see whether you had "full registration" on the dog, which would allow you to show in conformation and to breed the dog and register the puppies in AKC. A "limited registration" would not permit--or at least limit--those goals.

I used to think that "showing" just involved appearing with a clean, neat dog, but there are a lot of ways you can improve your chances of success. That's where attending some handling classes would help a lot.

I showed my first Standard Poodle in UKC to a championship and met a lot of friends and helpful people at the shows. Though he was eligible for AKC conformation, I didn't have the interest or skills to go all "big hair." I was much more interested in an obedience career for him and that's where my spare money went. The new dog, though fully registered in AKC, would be disqualified if I attempted to show in conformation because he is a brindle. The Poodle Club of America, which sets the poodle standard for the AKC, specifies that only solid-colored poodles may be shown in conformation. Even a mismark (a white spot anywhere) is enough to disqualify. However, UKC welcomes the multi-colors, where they show as a separate breed from the solids. Standards are shown in the Gun Dog group. I think the minis are in Companion and the Toys are in Toy. There are lots of differences between the two venues, so you'd do well to read up on both of them.
 

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Well my main goal is to breed her and um I'm only 13 so ig I didn't know that but from what I can tell I have went over the akc official standard of a poodle which is what she is registered under multiple times and I believe that she could win idk. I was just gonna try it out , I thought it would be fun and my mom don't wanna spend a lot of money on a poodle because she breeds Australian shepherds so don't think I could buy a poodle that has a showing line. so thank you for telling my lol but I have to start somewhwere right ? well either way thank you for telling me I just might reconsider showing.
View attachment 467287 That is her by the way
I think its great that you are interested in showing your poodle whether she is show quality is a guess but you could also show her in obedience. May be a little easier to begin. If I were you I would call a few breeders, tell them your age and see if any would be willing to evaluate your current pup for conformation showing. If she isn't you could go the obedience route which would be fun for you . Perhaps a local poodle club would help you. As far as breeding her, I think I wouldn't, not now and not at your age. There can be complications and lots of costs involved. There is so much involved in becoming a good breeder, and some of that involves genetic testing and many test cannot be complete until she is 2 years old. I'm sure people here will also give you pointers, and learning to groom at 13 is great too! Good luck to us and let us know how you are managing.
 

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You could also enter Obedience or Agility instead of Conformation. They are both more about you and your dog's training, ability, and intelligence instead of body and looks. I find them far more interesting :)
 

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Don't be discouraged. We had a young man who joined our poodle club at 16. He had a "starter" dog that was nice but hard to finish. He worked really hard, soaked up every bit of advice and help he was given, developed his skills and got better dogs. He is now one of the top breeders and handlers in the country. Starting young is good. As someone mentioned before, have your puppy evaluated by a quality breeder before you even consider breeding her. The breed standard can be tricky to understand if you haven't looked at a bunch of good dogs. If she isn't show quality, you can still grow her hair out and practice show grooming on her while you enter her in agility, rally, obedience or other performance events. If you prove you're serious and willing to put in the time and effort, a breeder interested in encouraging you might let you show a dog of theirs in Juniors. Get to know your local poodle breeders and exhibitors. They can help you. Please don't get your feelings hurt and give up if your puppy turns out not to be show quality. Enjoy the love and companionship she will give you while the two of you learn everything you can together.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Don't be discouraged. We had a young man who joined our poodle club at 16. He had a "starter" dog that was nice but hard to finish. He worked really hard, soaked up every bit of advice and help he was given, developed his skills and got better dogs. He is now one of the top breeders and handlers in the country. Starting young is good. As someone mentioned before, have your puppy evaluated by a quality breeder before you even consider breeding her. The breed standard can be tricky to understand if you haven't looked at a bunch of good dogs. If she isn't show quality, you can still grow her hair out and practice show grooming on her while you enter her in agility, rally, obedience or other performance events. If you prove you're serious and willing to put in the time and effort, a breeder interested in encouraging you might let you show a dog of theirs in Juniors. Get to know your local poodle breeders and exhibitors. They can help you. Please don't get your feelings hurt and give up if your puppy turns out not to be show quality. Enjoy the love and companionship she will give you while the two of you learn everything you can together.
thank you so much for the encouraging words wont give up that easy lol
 

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You could also enter Obedience or Agility instead of Conformation. They are both more about you and your dog's training, ability, and intelligence instead of body and looks. I find them far more interesting :)

okay I will look into that thank you :)
 
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