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Discussion Starter #1
Am I doing the right thing?? For some reason this guilt looms over me to not have Norman neutered....
Any advice on what to do? I think it’s for the best because I have heard of it preventing or helping prevent some health issues....
But every time I told someone about his appointment they all said to the effect of.. “poor thing”. My dad even tells me not to do it, yet all his animals have been fixed but they’re ere girls. I think it’s a man thing ....

Am I doing the right thing? Does it REALLY help him in the future??
As you can see I’m filled with anxiety and fear that this will be a regret.....
 

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What are your reasons for doing it? I don't think it's a bad idea, but I do think the benefits depend on the need for it. And each dog is different.
 

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What are your reasons for doing it? I don't think it's a bad idea, but I do think the benefits depend on the need for it. And each dog is different.
My top reason is to prevent testicular cancer and a few other diseases. Also, I have no desire to breed him or have him be sexually frustrated.
I feel like it will benefit him in the long run from what I’ve researched.

I guess my guilt is from people telling me I’m taking his “manhood” which sucks to hear.
 

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I was contractually obligated to neuter my dog, a standard requirement from a show breeder. That said, I could determine the when. I don’t get why many vets are in such a rush. The hardest part is keeping your dog on restricted activity.
 

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Norman is who he is, and he'll be that same man/dog/Norman post-surgery. My worry would be more about the possible complications of anaesthesia. I find it extremely stressful waiting for a surgical update. But it's worth it for Norman to have the fullest life he can possibly have, without any worries of an unintentional breeding.
 

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This is a link to data compiled by Dr Benjamin Hart with UC Davis.

Current studies lean to waiting til 2 years/full growth for spoos.

When I was researching for my mini boys, full growth was about 1 year. It seems to be the early loss of hormones that affect more than just the reproductive system in the long term.

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Sorry for the duplication, I see that I'd posted this in an earlier thread of yours.
 

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My top reason is to prevent testicular cancer and a few other diseases. Also, I have no desire to breed him or have him be sexually frustrated.
I feel like it will benefit him in the long run from what I’ve researched.

I guess my guilt is from people telling me I’m taking his “manhood” which sucks to hear.
Testicular cancer can occur in dogs but from what I understand they rarely metastasize and aren't considered as bad as many other cancers. Given that neutering increases rates of lymphoma and other cancers, it seems like neutering isn't necessarily the way to go for health reasons. But if/when I get a female dog I will probably go the route of traditional spay or at least ovary sparing spay. For females I feel like the benefits are definitely worth it.

Misha's nearly a year old now and my current plans are to keep him intact unless there's significant reason not to. I also worry about sexual frustration, but it seems like dogs are only actually frustrated if there are females in heat around. And even neutered males are often bothered by in heat females. So I'm not sure if it's accurate to worry about. I also don't want to breed Misha, so my plans are to go with a vasectomy if he reaches an age where I feel confident that I'd rather keep him intact. I don't see the reason for neuter over vasectomy for the purposes of preventing breeding. I am also a bit superficial in that I prefer the structure and musculature of intact males.

I actually have the opposite issue where his contract states that he cannot be neutered until over a year. And I think his breeder is totally fine with keeping him intact as well. He's on limited registration anyway.

I don't think dogs care one way or the other. Neutered males can be easier pets because you don't have to worry about hormones. Having an intact male means you have to be aware of their hormonal influences. At a year of age Norman's probably done most of his growing to the point where there won't be structural impacts from neutering. I think people talking about "manhood" are just anthropomorphizing. Dogs don't care.

It's a personal decision. I don't think either choice is wrong. But I also don't think you should make a decision because of pressuring from friends, family, or society. I live in a city where a very large percentage of male dogs are not neutered, so I haven't felt too much societal pressure. But I'm sure I would if I lived back home in Texas. I've had people try to pressure me from both sides though. I don't like making a decision when I feel that pressure. I'd rather wait until I don't feel pressure and feel good about my decision. He is your dog and you need to make up your mind for yourself. If you're really feeling conflicted you can definitely wait. Not because you've decided not to, but because you want more time to decide. There's no rush. I'd actually wait until 18-24 months to neuter a spoo anyway. I don't think my 1 year old mini is done maturing, so I would definitely also doubt that a spoo is at 1 yr.
 

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Definitely don't let guilt from others sway you one way or another. I chose to neuter my boys partly for health reasons, and partly for more options when traveling, whether going with us or boarding. I did choose to wait for physical maturity. I didn't consult them about their manhood but I did apologize to them :). Ultimately, they don't seem to have noticed or cared.

I was also more concerned this time over the anesthesia and the surgery. Before we scheduled, I made sure that pre surgical bloodwork was done, that the anesthesia was the kind that left their system rapidly after the surgery was done, that a tech or nurse would be with the vet during the surgery to monitor bp and such, and that someone would be staying with them til they were fairly awake and not in any distress post op. The one thing I didn't do was have a catheter placed in case there was a need to administer other meds on an urgent basis. I'd probably do that now too.

Whatever you do or don't and when, it should be when you're comfortable with your decision.
 
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