Poodle Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,398 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
To be quite honest, I think there is something wrong with P's wiring. Nothing blatantly obvious, but often, and randomly, he will throw his head straight back in the air and begin to lick his nose repeatedly. This is not normal behavior. I have never seen any other dog do this.

I would say the last time he did it was two nights ago, standing on my bed. Before that, in a chair about a week ago... Before that, sitting on the floor, cleaning himself. The times it happens are incredibly and truly random. He isn't always doing one certain thing to trigger this. Usually, he will do it for about a minute or two (throwing his head back, licking his nose, putting head down, then repeating) and then he is back to normal. On rare occasions, this will last (with little 15 or so second breaks) for 5 to 10 minutes. Also, occasionally, it will be really bad, and he will have a few "fits" in a day, and sometimes on repeating days.

His body never convulses or anything like that, he doesn't act dizzy, etc., but you can tell what he is doing isn't voluntary, and if he could stop, I'm sure he would.

We tried to look up what it could possibly be, and haven't found a hint of anything it could be at all. We're quite stumped. Other than those times though, he is fine and leads a happy life.

Ideas?

(Sorry in advance if there are typos, I am on my BB. Also, my mother saw his haircut and said I did pretty good... Other than the ears. He was a wonderful gentleman at her house, and remembered that Yaya's dogs are extra spoiled and there are rawhides everywhere! He happily picked the one the size of his entire body to chew!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,546 Posts
The first thing that pops into my head is: how long is the hair on his face? is it getting caught in his mouth? have his teeth been checked (specifically thinking of problems with incisors)? In other words - rule out something going on around or in his mouth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
I have two non-poodles who do this. Not daily, but I see it. Mine look like they are "licking the air". I see it sometimes after licking something else (themselves included) and have assumed they were trying to get a nasty taste out of their mouths, or that they were indeed licking the air even. They are in general, licky dogs that like to lick a lot. I wouldn't worry about it unless it becomes obsessive. Dogs can get obsessive about behaviors but if you see it too often for comfort, redirect the dog with something better to do so that it doesn't become a compulsive behavior.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,398 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
The first thing that pops into my head is: how long is the hair on his face? is it getting caught in his mouth? have his teeth been checked (specifically thinking of problems with incisors)? In other words - rule out something going on around or in his mouth.
The hair on his face is short. However I have witnessed him doing this with both long and short hair, as he has had both while living with me. His teeth haven't been checked in depth by a vte, however, they are pearly white and clean (especially since I have been good about brushing his teeth lately!)

I have two non-poodles who do this. Not daily, but I see it. Mine look like they are "licking the air". I see it sometimes after licking something else (themselves included) and have assumed they were trying to get a nasty taste out of their mouths, or that they were indeed licking the air even. They are in general, licky dogs that like to lick a lot. I wouldn't worry about it unless it becomes obsessive. Dogs can get obsessive about behaviors but if you see it too often for comfort, redirect the dog with something better to do so that it doesn't become a compulsive behavior.
I would day him doing this is almost obsessive, but like I said, it is really random when it happens, and not always after cleaning himself. I feel terrible when he's into it, because he just looks at you with these big, concerned eyes like, "hey, I can't stop!"

That's just my take on it, I will have to get TheFiance on here to share that side of what happens.

I have tried googling. Since google rules all... And can't find anything from people describing something similar. Will try to get it on video.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,905 Posts
Could be OCD. Google "obsessive-compulsive licking in dogs"

What are some examples of obsessive-compulsive disorder? Top
Repetitive motor, grooming, ingestive, or hallucinogenic behaviours that occur out of context, or of excessive duration or frequency include pacing, circling, incessant or rhythmic barking, fly snapping or chasing invisible objects, acral lick dermatitis, flank sucking, freezing and staring, excessive water consumption, sucking, licking or chewing on objects (or owners), tonguing or licking the air and other forms of self mutilation. Freezing and staring is also considered an obsessive-compulsive disorder if it is an inappropriate and extended behaviour.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,532 Posts
I had no idea that OCD presents itself in dogs!! Our Golden Retriever drives us nuts with a constant licking of her front paw with an awful slurping sound. We try often to redirect her attention of just plain try to stop her from doing it but have very little luck with either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,398 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Wow, Marian, thanks! I can't tell you how many times I have looked for stuff. This sounds a lot like him. The tonging the air as well as the barking.

I wonder what brings it on in dogs? I know in some people it is brought on by a traumatic event, or a fear. You guys think the same could be applied to dogs? Wonder if I can get him some ocd meds. Lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,905 Posts
OCD isn't usually environmental. It might be triggered by an event, or worsened by an event, but it's something you're born with. I have it and it manifests itself in various ways, but it's not really something you have to treat unless it's severely negatively impacting your life in some way.

As for OCD in dogs...I have no idea. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,398 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
OCD isn't usually environmental. It might be triggered by an event, or worsened by an event, but it's something you're born with. I have it and it manifests itself in various ways, but it's not really something you have to treat unless it's severely negatively impacting your life in some way.

As for OCD in dogs...I have no idea. :)
Like possibly being abandoned? That is kind of traumatic. On Christmas, my brother and I actually talked about Perry... My brother is the one who found him, and he says that my poor baby was curled up in a corner not moving, and they initially thought he was dead. Then when he moved (and scared the poo out of everyone), my brother said that he just sat there with huge eyes, shaking badly and shied away from my brother trying to pet him. We're big animal lovers in my family, and neither my brother or I could just leave a dog.

One of my old roommates was OCD (among other things... Like being just plain crazy! Seriosly!), and hers was triggered by depression, hence her taking depression meds to control her ocd.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,905 Posts
Yeah, definitely that kind of trauma could trigger it. The poor baby. It rips my heart out to hear these kinds of stories. How could anyone do that to a poor defenseless animal? I really don't understand it. :(
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top