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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone, I’m considering adopting a 7-year old standard poodle. I’ve only ever had a miniature. I wanted to have a good bond with her but I never really did. She was my husband’s bestie. I’ve always wanted to have that unconditional bond. I’m going with my husband to see him tomorrow. I’ve got my leash and temporary collar ready. Any advice on getting an older SPOO? Is it possible to tweak their name?
 

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I wish you luck on your visit. Poodles do tend to be more devoted to one person than several so I hope you click with the dog you are meeting. I suspect you can change an older dog's name, but you would have to really work at teaching the new one.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Wow, I never realized that they preferred one human. Well then, I’m probably not going to get the bond I want then. My husband is calm, happy, and playful. ? Everyone loves him. We will have to see how it goes. As for teaching the name, maybe I will just add to it. His name is Brou which rhymes with blue. We will maybe give him a nickname like Brouster or Bruno...and keep his name.
 

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Well don't make any predictions about who he may be drawn to. Also Lily while she is clearly my dog in her head still adores my BF. He was the one who was home with her when she and Peeves were baby dogs so she has a special affinity for him and he does some silly games with her that she has no interest in doing with me. Javelin is more a one person dog, but that is by design since he is in training to do service work for me. He and I are together 24/7. I've also seen dogs that clearly preferred people of the opposite sex to them.
 
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Yes, don't go into meeting him with the idea he's going to prefer your husband! Plus, I agree that poodles tend to adore the opposite sex, but still be loving to both sexes. My boy is extremely devoted to me, whereas my female loves everyone in the family almost equally. Bringing a tug toy and pre-approved treats when you meet him is a good idea! I like the idea of just lightly changing his name. I've gotten many shelter dogs including Zooey who had to be renamed because I didn't know their original name and they all adapted just fine. Good luck!
 

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I got Oliver from his first family when he was four. He kept his first name, but together we added his middle name when I started down the alphabet and he reacted well to Andrew :).
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Well, we went. I didn’t bring the kids because I didn’t want them to get attached. The establishment seemed a little shady and the male was so over powering only ever kneeled. Wouldn’t release the ball and kept jumping. So, I couldn’t imagine him even recognizing if my 5 year old was being pummeled. So no way on the male.

They also had a girl and she was smart and two years younger, but I was nervous because she has always been kenneled and never in a house. She would come, listen, get off when I asked her to and didn’t do it again. The sweetest happiest temperament. I really thought she had great potential. I just wanted to save her and give her a good home. I’m just not sure what it will be like. I’m new to this and don’t know how to train her. What would you guys do?
 

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Are these like retired backyard breeding or puppy mill dogs? I would shudder at the thought of even putting a small adoption fee in the pockets of someone who had given such a sad life to their dogs. I would think very carefully before adding a rescue-type dog into a family with children. Usually if you get one from a shelter or rescue then they want what is best for the dog and will let your family have a trial, or will take the dog back if it doesn’t work out. If it is just from shady people then you may be stuck trying to rehome a dog with behavioral problems that your family can’t live with. Best of luck in getting a perfect fit poodle, however you may do it!
 

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I am sorry things didn't turn out as you would have liked.


I agree with chinchillafuzzy about not adopting from a less than stellar breeder. Also one should never feel like you are getting a certain dog to save it. How old are your children? A puppy may actually be a better fit for your family.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the kind words. I thought it strange that they wanted such a high adoption fee and put the neutering on me as well. I wouldn’t want to support it. Borderline backyard breeder, I researched what that meant. She said she had 19 dogs. All kenneled. She also had shock collars on them for barking...which I can see may be necessary if they are all in a barn in kennels barking at the same time. I feel awful about it. The female seemed happy...but your right I shouldn’t feel obligated to ‘save’ her... what kind of issues do dogs have that are kenneled most of the day? She did have a nice big fenced yard for them to run and play in.

My kids are 10, 8, and 5. We are done having kids. I was hesitant to get a puppy because I’ve never done that before. I don’t want to screw it up. I bet they would love watching the puppy grow up!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Also, I work in the schools and am gone most of the day. I do come home for lunch everyday. I don’t know how a puppy would do with that. Would it be better to go the puppy route if we got them beginning of Summer, before break when I am home all day?
 

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Thanks for the kind words. I thought it strange that they wanted such a high adoption fee and put the neutering on me as well. I wouldn’t want to support it. Borderline backyard breeder, I researched what that meant. She said she had 19 dogs. All kenneled. She also had shock collars on them for barking...
Oh no. I would RUN FAST AND FAR from this puppy mill breeder. Oh my goodness. It makes me so sad to think of all of the puppies they are cranking out of there’s with 19 kenneled dogs. This is purely a money maker for them. They don’t care about their breeding dogs. I’m sorry if I offend anyone but I do not agree with any breeder who has a whole bunch of dogs living in a kennel for their entire lives with shock collars on, just pumping out puppies. That is so wrong. There are so many good breeders out there doing it right - their dogs are loved members of the family. They use guardian homes for their breeding dogs that they can’t keep (because it is so much better for the dogs to have loving homes instead of living in a kennel.) Stay far far away from this. I hope no one on this forum ever has the misfortune of getting a puppy from there. There is fairly new science proving that experiences that happen to parents are genetically passed on to their offspring. (In humans and all animals.) As such I would never support someone who doesn’t raise their breeding dogs properly. There are plenty of good breeders out there who may be looking to retire their dogs and this is a great option. I also think that a puppy could work out for you guys if you do some research. We are here to help if you are looking for a good breeder. I will get off my soapbox now haha.
 

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Also, I work in the schools and am gone most of the day. I do come home for lunch everyday. I don’t know how a puppy would do with that. Would it be better to go the puppy route if we got them beginning of Summer, before break when I am home all day?
Yes, this would be the better plan. You mentioned you're not familiar with training a puppy, so between now and summer is perfect to start reading up Ian Dunbar, Jean Donaldson, Susan Garrett, and others. You can search out local places for puppy kindergarden and higher classes, too.

And, if you start now looking for a great breeder who can help you get the right puppy for your family, you'll have time to save up and to start buying supplies. Folks here are invaluable for breeder referrals :).

This seems like a perfect plan to help you all as a family to get fully ready, and to model for the children how good it is to learn about something first.
 

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Well, I have to agree that it's not wise to support what appears to be a backyard breeder/puppymill situation. That said, my heart aches for those poor dogs and if I was face to face with them I'm not sure I could walk away. I suppose we can't save them all and sadly there will always be more.
 

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Also, I work in the schools and am gone most of the day. I do come home for lunch everyday. I don’t know how a puppy would do with that. Would it be better to go the puppy route if we got them beginning of Summer, before break when I am home all day?
This would be a good time to get on a breeder's list for a summer litter. Do you have a geographic area of interest?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
We are in Southeast Michigan. From a quick perusal last night on the AKC website. Targa Poodles do meticulous health testing and have champion show dogs. There is also one called Aglow Standards, which is a hobby breeder who also do health checks. Their dogs are their pets and live in their home. They have creams and reds. I think I prefer black. From PoodleForum, I read about AngelAviary. They are 30 minutes from my house.
 

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Just catching up, first welcome to the forum. Lots of helpful people on here. I am glad you didn't get a dog from those people. Sounds like a commercial operation or higher classed puppymll. (if clean). I would not buy a dog from anyone whose pups are raided in a kennel their whole life and certainly to an older dog. Socialization is so important especially when the pups are young. My dog i almost 11 months and friendly however when he see a child he tenses up if they are running and screaming. He ha not been socialized enough with children.I work with him everyday but I don't get to different scenerios as often as I should. I think poodles are extremely sensitive and could not imagine one ling without his person outside in a kennel atmosphere. Really not good for anyone. Take your time looking and do not rush. I know around here our local poodle rescue is always getting dogs, several have been standards and they go into foster care while their personalties become known. I would trust them to place the dog in the right home. In fact my neighbor recently adopted her 2nd standard from them. He is really exceptional. Very well trained, walks on leash. HIs owner was older and fell into poor health. A member on this board a month or so back had to place her poodle. She got it as a puppy but could not handle all the work and puppy behavior with her 3 children, it was constantly jumping on them and they were getting hurt. The is my 1st poodle and I find he is more sensitive, more energetic, jumping, bouncing then any dog I've ever had. I am older, retired have had and trained many dogs in my lifetime so I am prepared and will do what is necessary to have him be the dog I want him to be. I am also realistic that it may take me 3-4 years of oncnd off trying to get that. It takes lots of time and patience to train a puppy especially when you have young children. If you decide on a puppy I would wait until Spring , early summer when you have more time for training. I don't want to sound like I am discouraging lots of people manage just fine . Good luck in your search and I'm sure folks on here can point you in the direction of a reputable breeder, and or rescue.
 

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You’re almost in my backyard (IL)! Breeders in Michigan also include Jacknic, breeding both solids and particolored poodles,

https://www.jacknickennel.com/

They would refer you to other breeders if they have no litters planned for your time frame, which any responsible breeder should. They fully health test and title their dogs.

Highview is also in Michigan, though some of their litters were raised elsewhere. I have no personal experience though they got a second look from me a few years ago.

https://highviewpoodlepuppies.weebly.com/

There are also many good breeders in Indiana and Ohio, depending on your travel distance.

These are breeders that have a small number of litters a year so advanced planning may be needed to find a puppy for your time frame. I like small breeders because they have time to provide the attention that puppies need in the early weeks to make wonderful companions. They also know their puppies’ ‘personalities’ and can help match the best pup to each home.

Gathering information is always helpful. Web sites can be incomplete, or glossy on the surface and missing important details such as health testing. Phone calls are good, and perhaps a visit before a litter is on the ground to assure yourself that all is well and to show the breeder that you’re serious.

Here’s the link to more discussion on buying a puppy safely:
https://www.poodleforum.com/5-poodle-talk/33522-buying-puppy-safely-basics.html

I found the Versatility In Poodles website helpful. Among their resources is a list of questions to ask breeders.
Home - Versatility In Poodles, Inc. : Versatility In Poodles, Inc.
 
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