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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there,
I’m new to this site and I kind of need my mind easing with some experienced poodle owners input...
So last year (st georges day), my 5 year old tiny 8lb toy poodle got literally ripped in half by 2 labradors. Luckily she was on leash so I managed to pull her over a fence. But she suffered serious damage, she went straight into vets for life saving surgery, the vet was honest and didn’t expect her to survive. Against all odds, she did! A week later, the huge wound became infected and she had to have another life saving surgery and a large amount of skin removed. It took her only around a month after the second surgery to become mobile again. Obviously I took everything very slowly with her to ensure proper recovery. Fast forward 6 months, she started struggling physically with walks or playing. Her front legs (around the wound area would just give way on her or she would squeal out in pain. Now this is where I’m confused because I asked the vet regarding this and he says that wouldn’t be from the surgery. Could it be a hereditary issue? Or some nerve issue?
This is the only poodle I’ve ever had, she’s full pedigree, she is now 6 years old, still happy and loves the kids, cat and other dogs (except black labs, she growls at and I don’t blame her!).
I know this has affected mentally me a lot more than it has her, I still have nightmares reliving it! But I know I’m not being paranoid that my dog is suffering physically. One minute she’s fine running round with the kids playing ball, then another day she will have no energy and be limp. Her scar is very prominent and visible even when her hair is long, and it runs all the way from her shoulder down her ribs and under her armpit and up her chest. I do have a lot of pictures but they are very disturbing so I’ve not put them on as some may get upset.
Any help/advice would be very appreciated.
Thank you I’m advance for reading my thread, it’s felt good in a way to offload
 

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Honestly I would bring your pup in for a head to toe health exam.
Think outside the box it might be from the attack and injuries and it might not be either.

Heart disease
IVDD
Among other things could as also be a cause

It would be a good idea to video these episodes to show your vet
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Honestly I would bring your pup in for a head to toe health exam.
Think outside the box it might be from the attack and injuries and it might not be either.

Heart disease
IVDD
Among other things could as also be a cause

It would be a good idea to video these episodes to show your vet
Yes I started to video a few weeks ago, only managed to get a little bit of one episode so far as they’re so out the blue I never know when it’s going to happen. Soon as I’ve got enough evidence, she’ll be going back in the vets for a full examination
 

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I know it's difficult.
Can you get a second opinion?
The world is a bit crazy now, so I appreciate the difficulty of the situation you are in.
 

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Luna
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Im so sorry to hear about your poor baby. Perhaps it is some type of nerve pain she's experiencing? Nerve pain can be very debilitating, can come and go out of the blue. I hope that the vet can figure it out quickly whatever it may be.
 

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Peggy Sue, Standard Poodle Born May 2019
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What an awful situation. My heart breaks for you and your little girl. I’m so sorry. :( We’re here to listen any time.

There could be many different sources of her pain, but the obvious one to me would be scar tissue. As the nerves regenerate, scar tissue can become extremely painful. It can also interfere with movement, creating trigger points and causing referred pain.

(I speak from personal experience, albeit not the canine variety. And it took more energy than I really had at the time to find someone who took my concerns seriously. When I finally did, I experienced near immediate pain relief after a year of torment.)

I would seek a second opinion. And maybe even a third, if necessary. Do you have many options near you? A board certified veterinary surgeon would be my first choice.

Depending on their findings, I would also seek the help of a chiropractor or physical therapist. Look for veterinary rehabilitation centers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you everyone for your great advice. I really appreciate it. Luckily where I live, I have many top vets (I also have vet connections as volunteer for a rescue), if none of the local vets can diagnose her then I don’t mind travelling the whole UK to find the best vet who can give answers. Times are currently very tricky but I’ll keep pushing to get her the best care ASAP wherever that may be. I truly believe it’s some kind of nerve damage but we shall see. Again thank you all so so much. I feel like a weights been lifted just by speaking out about it xx
 

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I am so sorry to hear your struggles. I would rule out an orthopedic cause with an orthopedic specialist if it seems to be an issue with her front legs. My dog suffered a mild injury about a year ago on his ear. It is completely healed but he will still cry if you move his ear a certain way. I have no idea why. Sometimes pain can be psychological. But I would for sure seek additional opinions about your case.
 
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