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Our 7lb toy has gone through four leads. He's chewed through a 10ft Flexi, a 10ft Everpet, a 16ft Kong (literally tore through it in 30 seconds when my back was turned). We got the chewing under control but our current 26ft Flexi we bought in December is near breaking at the point where the cord ends at the mechanism's opening

I emailed Flexi about the warranty and am sending it in but I need a good lead in the meantime. The last Flexi and the Kong were for larger dogs. The Kong was even the ribbon style.

Looking for something durable and long. He likes to zoom at the end of the walk and it makes us smile watching him do it, so 20+ feet would be best. I guess if I have to I'll buy another Flexi and put something on the cable so it doesn't wear down.

I'm willing to spend a bit more if I can get something durable.
 

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With respect, they couldn't pay me to buy a flexi lead, no matter what brand.

I have a Tpoo, albeit oversized, and in the city, want the ability to stay connected to him always.

I get the wish for lightweight, totally do, just for us, two leads clipped together are the most I'd do in case of a poor decision by my Poodle re traffic or other dogs. There is a mixed breed dog (not a bully breed) who lives in our building who's wanted to kill Oliver for some time, and her owner and I know to head opposite directions. Ol has never started the argument, btw, and he kindly doesn't bark/growl back at the other dog, so happily he's far easier to redirect on the days our schedules collide.

Every situation is a bit different, just I've read of way too many human injuries to ever consider the purchase of a flexible lead. I know one can order very long cotton or other fabric leads, so maybe buying one of those could be a thought.

Maybe something along this line? It comes in lengths from 15 to 100 feet.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01DSMT5H0?aaxitk=G6Hn5.PmZMXFguKMJYNryg
 

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I agree - a six foot lead for walking near traffic, and a long soft line that can be looped for letting the dog run on where it is safe. That way you can also ensure a gentle slow down, rather than a whiplash jerk when the cord runs out. Even better, is there anywhere he can zoom safely off leash? I too love watch my dogs running for the sheer joy of running - we are fortunate to have lots of safe grassy lawns and fields where they can zoom unencumbered.
 
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Also respectfully I would never again use a retractable leash so I am no help. I used one years ago and my dog was injured when at the end of his walk he zoomed and the lead came to an abrupt stop. Cost me $3000. back then . He injured his disc's. This was on a chihuahua so typically a small dog. My neighbor also had her dogs leg injured when it did't retract fast enough to keep him safe and he got all tangled. I wouldn't walk him on more than a 6 ft leash and if you want to give him some freedom in a safe area why not go with a 20 ft lead that doesn't retract but you still will have control if he doesn't return to you. Anyway just my humble opinion from past experiences.
 

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As others have said you do not need a retractable lead for the purpose you have been using it. If you do not have a fenced yard and want your pup to be able to romp then use a regular long line and only on your property. Make sure there are no other dogs that might run up on your dog while doing so. Your tpoo is potentially vulnerable to being badly hurt or worse if far away from you and running like a prey item with larger dogs around.

Flexi leads can be dangerous. Read the instruction sheet that comes with them. People have been badly hurt using them too. http://www.callingalldogs.com/Flexi_Retractable_Leash_Safety_Information.htm

All that said I do have flexi leads, but never ever use them for walking with any of our dogs. I use them in obedience training as a way to be able to give an informational correction at a distance for a dog that is not doing as it was told. Period, the end.
 

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Ok - so sorry y'all - but I am a Flexi user. Learned how to use one as a child and I really like going on hikes with one.
Three provisos:
1. Your dog needs to be trained to walk without a leash in the heel position reliably or with a regular leash without pulling. If he/she can't - never Flexi.
2. You need to know how to work a Flexi - this is usually the most contested of my provisos because everybody "thinks" they know.... 99% of people don't. It is not unlike long line training with a horse. If you don't know how to work a lunge line you could trip your horse or get insured yourself. If you don't know how to use a Flexi you could hurt your dog, yourself or other dogs. Also no fraternizing with other dogs on a Flexi.
3. Tape Flexis only - no other Flexi is safe. The string ones should have been outlawed a long time ago.

I don't think that Flexi will replace your leash because your dog chewed it - and I don't think they should. This is a training issue that does not fall under manufacturer's warranty.
 

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Moni you are the exception that proves the rule.
 

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I also have been using retractable leads forever. In the city. I am very careful with it and never had an incident.

Rigth now Merlin is on it, but since he tends to stay close to me and Beckie needs more exercise, I started training her on it too. I switch them so they each get more exercise.

When there is too much going on, I just block the leash to a 4-5 foot lead and that’s it. I find it very convenient but I agree it can be a disaster in the wrong hands.

Having said that, I think mine is a Flexi leash (small) but my dogs don’t chew on it.
 

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Moni you are the exception that proves the rule.
It is a tool - that with training (loads of it) has its purpose. I don't think it should ever be used on a puppy. A dog has to mature to be allowed to use it AND it is a must that the dog does not control the Flexi - you do. I use mine at all lengths and the dog has no control over what length we work it. IF the dog pulls - this immediately becomes "Heel on a Flexi" (you get quite the looks). I very very very rarely see people use a Flexi correctly - basically never - that is the sad truth. (dog shows are the exception where lots of handlers use them too - I don't remember his name but one handler famously uses it while riding this particularly ridiculous fold up bicycle) I have a pic somewhere of him on the bike - he is quite tall with a Flexi on a Giant Schnauzer and an umbrella...
 

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I think that there are many tools that get a bad reputation and/or get misused to bad outcomes! Flexis are right at the top of the list on this. I use my flexis for training the distance obedience exercises to prevent my dogs from thinking they can take off on me if they see something they think is more attractive or interesting and such. If I send a dog to a glove and they go for the wrong one I can stop them if needed. I can control them when we are doing recalls, command discriminations and recalls too.

The other tools that people don't get the proper use of are pinch collars (too many jerks yanking their dogs around on wrong sized collars) and e collars where people don't introduce them in a way that they can be faded when appropriate and end up hurting their dogs by turning up the voltage (I only use mine on a gentle vibrate to give a correction (and rarely) or with the tone to give a marker for a correct behavior at distance).

The only tool I have no use for is an unlimited slip collar, aka choke chain (the second name says what is wrong with it).
 
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My humble opinion, but I would never use a flex lead. I made that mistake with one of my springer spaniels and I was injured quite badly when the dog lunged and I was thrown on my back. When I was training Asta as a puppy, I used a regular 6 ft lead and when he was okay with that, I allowed him a 30 ft lead which gave him quite a bit of freedom. I don't have to use leads with him now (we live on 12 acres in the county), except when we go to town on our adventures. He now has figured out that when the lead goes on we are going places - happy.
 

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On our daily walk, Tonka wanders around at the end of his flexi... across neighbour's yards as I stick to the lane. But only one walk in ten we might encounter a car or a neighbour. So the flexi is appropriate.

In a crowd, I can shorten a flexi to a 6" leash. I like that.

Flexis allow the dog some freedom, but require the handler to take up that slack.... 100% alertness. Listening, looking around, not standing there talking while the dog circles people. If you're not that prepared, you better stick to a standard leash.

String leashes??? Good for hanging laundry maybe...

ETA: Chewing?? With Tonka it was boredom and now I wanna play tug... with you on one end of the leash and me on the other. I 'discouraged' that and he doesn't do it any more.
 

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Hate flexis and will never use them or recommend them.
:dito:

Additionally, if I want my dogs to have lots of freedom to run, sniff wherever they want (within reason) I take them someplace safe that's off leash. Otherwise, they walk along on a 6 ft. leash and stay relatively close to me. If they want to go sniff a little ways from where we're walking, I'll not let them pull me (hate that) but will go along with them to see what is so fascinating. lol. They are allowed to show me. So they can still have a nice walk, "go sniff" (a cue that tells them they can go ahead and do whatever and I'll come along) and if they really want to rip roar and explore better, it's in the back yard or someplace else safe off leash, like an off leash hike. But they do have a good recall.

I guess the flexis work for some people. I just think there's too much risk involved...a chance it'll snap or something could go wrong. I can just see me tripping, falling (did that once) and letting go of that thing. Yikes! :afraid:
 

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:dito:

Additionally, if I want my dogs to have lots of freedom to run, sniff wherever they want (within reason) I take them someplace safe that's off leash. Otherwise, they walk along on a 6 ft. leash and stay relatively close to me. If they want to go sniff a little ways from where we're walking, I'll not let them pull me (hate that) but will go along with them to see what is so fascinating. lol. They are allowed to show me. So they can still have a nice walk, "go sniff" (a cue that tells them they can go ahead and do whatever and I'll come along) and if they really want to rip roar and explore better, it's in the back yard or someplace else safe off leash, like an off leash hike. But they do have a good recall.

I guess the flexis work for some people. I just think there's too much risk involved...a chance it'll snap or something could go wrong. I can just see me tripping, falling (did that once) and letting go of that thing. Yikes! :afraid:
You bring up yet another important training point with Flexis. I know 99% of y'all don't like them - but since I am the 1% that uses them and recommend immense amount of training with them - here is another piece of advice.
When you drop a Flexi that handle part will loudly and menacingly chase your dog and the faster it runs away from you the faster the racket behind it will follow. You HAVE to train for either a STOP command that is rock solid, or for particularly frightened dogs a "Come to me" command. I have seen so many dogs lost like that. You train for this in an enclosed area and I recommend you start as soon as you want to intro the Flexi. The dog MUST understand what to do in case you drop your end of the Flexi.
 

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Many thanks to those of you who do use flexis, and who shared cautionary tips and your wisdom. I learned from you today, and while I'm still not going to purchase or recommend them, do feel I have more of a sense of context with them. And I have lunged horses, so that bit was very interesting personally.

Thanks all, and to PJR202, I really hope I did not come across as harsh. I've read a few people's tales of getting injured by their own flexi leads, so have had a strong aversion.
 

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I thought I should clarify upon thinking further back when my dog was injured, I was liking it and had a good use of it. When he got hurt I was off guard and he just took off I think after a squirrel. When just walking it was nice , I thought I had good control of it, and back then they did not make tape flex's only string. Now with a Standard I feel I have better control with a short lead.
 

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Great point, Moni! I used a ribbon flexi with my last dog and if it had to be dropped in an emergency or if you drop it by accident, the hand piece rockets towards your dog, loudly. Sometimes the rolling back mechanism in the hand piece fails and then you don’t have any control. I prefer a 6’ leather lead and will never buy another flexi. For tinies, I would get rolled leather which is light.
 

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I use a Flexi for potty trips only. I would never take Noelle for a walk with a Flexi. They're just too dangerous. Go out in the deep snow and pee, and come back, fine. Other than that, I prefer a 6 foot leather leash.
 

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After 60 years of having dogs and training dogs professionally, I have come to realize that no matter how well trained a dog is...no matter how rock solid their recall is, their stay is, there is ALWAYS a certain percentage of a chance they'll be unreliable at some point. This is behavioral law. (because they're animals, not machines) (maybe even the law of averages? LOL. I dunno):dontknow: A squirrel runs past, a cat, something causes them to become distracted where they haven't been before. They may not have had ample prey training either. And that one time is the time the dog will bolt or lunge, yank the leash out of your hand. And a dog can be killed with that thing, especially a small dog. The human in the picture can also be harmed...and sometimes seriously.

It is not like lunging a horse. You do not use a flexi on a horse. At least I never did. Can you imagine letting go and having that thing wind up and smack a horse??? OMG!:scared: You use a rope or lunge line out of nylon and you never ever wrap that rope around your hand lest you want to run the risk of being dragged. If the horse trips over it, you let go and no one is the worse for wear. If a dog yanks a regular 6 ft. leash out of your hand, he runs and yes, he may be hit by a car. But I think that's not terribly likely if you're not by a road. And of course, it's imperative to have good training so that the odds are in your favor. I practice "halt" every day. And it's been proofed several times in real life situations where I've dropped the leash. But if I dropped a Flexi, yikes! Somebody's going to be hurt or killed.

I think that's great that you have not had any incidents and you've dodged the bullet so far. I hope it will always be that way for you. Most people don't get rock solid behaviors. It takes a tremendous amount of ambition and resolve and I commend you for that. But knowing animal behavior, I would never trust any dog to be 100% reliable. Not ever. And I wouldn't trust my hands not to let go by accident. It happens with my regular leash. I've tripped, fallen, my hand got weak, numb for a second from carpel tunnel so that I dropped it. And even if the dog stopped, by that time the handle on the flexi would have smacked him a good one.

Another reason I don't like the idea is that there is always some tension on the dog's neck or harness so he doesn't feel what it's like to have slack. And it may be harder to train him to not pull on a leash. See...my dogs walk and their leash must have slack. The minute they create tension at all...by forging ahead, the walk stops or we go backwards. Loose leash = go. Tension = stop. So, by having the flexi on, they always feel tension, right? Or I guess when you lock it there isn't. But anyhow, for training to walk on a loose leash, I prefer a regular leash anyhow.
 
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