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Mia, Christmas in June 2010
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Mia saw her chiropractor today. Mia usually doesn't need much tweaking, but she had a lot of adjustments today. I got a chance to talk with the chiro about Mia's slowing down, and she confirmed my hunch that this is something to pay attention to because it's way too fast. I am to see how Mia reacts to this adjustment and then return in early January to see how well the adjustment held.

Beyond that, the chiro said there's a new product on the market aimed at preventing muscle loss in older dogs. It's called MYOS and it's incredibly expensive for something that doesn't have a lot of data yet. Has anyone here heard anything about it?
 

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Hmmmmm... As far as I can see it is dried egg yolk. Would be a lot cheaper just to feed eggs! Traditionally food formulations for older adults have been lower in protein - especially for cats, given the very high prevalence of kidney disease in elderly cats. More recent research has shown that senior cats and dogs actually need more high quality protein than younger adults, and that keeping up protein levels can reduce sarcopenia. So there is some sense in feeding egg yolks, that are high in biologically appropriate protein and easily digested. But not, I think, at that price!
 
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Peggy Sue, Standard Poodle Born May 2019
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Hmmmmm... As far as I can see it is dried egg yolk. Would be a lot cheaper just to feed eggs! Traditionally food formulations for older adults have been lower in protein - especially for cats, given the very high prevalence of kidney disease in elderly cats. More recent research has shown that senior cats and dogs actually need more high quality protein than younger adults, and that keeping up protein levels can reduce sarcopenia. So there is some sense in feeding egg yolks, that are high in biologically appropriate protein and easily digested. But not, I think, at that price!
Sounds like it's specifically fertilized egg yolk. I wonder if/how that makes a difference?
 

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FWIW, I expected something less than this report. Fortetropin was the subject of the study.



UC Berkeley Effects of Fortetropin on the Rate of Muscle Protein Synthesis in Older Men and Women: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Study

It looks like the company is funding the studies over several years but if there's hanky panky, it's at UC Berkeley, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, and Kansas State University :).
 

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Interesting - but I think I would want to see a comparison with egg yolk rather than cheese powder, and results from a cohort of over 65s rather than healthy young men...
 

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Interesting - but I think I would want to see a comparison with egg yolk rather than cheese powder, and results from a cohort of over 65s rather than healthy young men...
I can't say why cheese powder was chosen as the placebo, and it cant be denied that 10 people is a very small sampling, but they did graze on your last item.

from the UC Berkeley paper
Effects of Fortetropin on the Rate of Muscle Protein Synthesis in Older Men and Women: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Study

"The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 21 days of Fortetropin supplementation on the fractional synthetic rate (FSR) of muscle protein in 10 healthy, older men and 10 women (66.4 ± 4.5 y)."
 

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Found something explaining why raw fertilized eggs are not simply fed (putting aside the cheese powder placebo for the nonce).

This too might be considered self-serving but finding the study also written up in DVM360 lends some credence to me.
 

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Mia, Christmas in June 2010
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Thanks for the research, Rose. Promising, but early days.

To our horror and disgust, my high school chemistry teacher ate fertilized eggs. Perhaps - apparently? - it has nutritional qualities that eggs and chicken lack.
 

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Lots of free range eggs here are fertilised - almost inevitable if a rooster is run with the hens, and they often are as protection for the flock.
 
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