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My girl is super old. She is 14 and has no teeth. She is a rescue that I have had for a couple years now. I did buy a clicker but have been too stressed to even try it. I feel like he has no desire to listen to me at all. I know I need to start just doing it.
Have you ever clicker trained? If not, I'd keep the clicker on the shelf for now. That's what I did for Peggy's first 6 months or so. I wasn't confident I was mentally or physically coordinated enough to use that particular tool effectively while trying to wrangle a puppy.

You start puppy class soon, right? I'd focus on having fun with your puppy between now and then. Learn each other.
 

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This is how I feel too. Like I am just sucking it up because it is the right thing to do. I took him and my senior toy girl to the beach tonight and found it so stressful. Off leash (In a secluded beach area) it was fine but on the leash is such a nightmare. He pulls and trieS to jump on the smaller dog and doesn’t listen at all. I have treats with me and he just pulls the whole time. I am going to have to start walking them separately as it is just too hard walking them both. I actually do have a mini carpet cleaner but it doesn’t do much. I was so happy when my son got home and he could take the dog for a bit. I feel like a bad person I have been waiting for him for ages and now just feel like I am a basket of stress. I dread walking him. I tried a harness and that is no better than the normal leash. I suppose maybe one of those leashes that go around the mouth is what I will try next.
I think he's a little young for a gentle leader headcollar just yet. The reason to walk him in a harness now is to protect his neck. My guess is that he probably has next to no clue about walking on a leash. You don't want him wrenching his neck sideways at high speed when he fails to understand the leash is only six feet long.

I would take a two pronged approach to the leash situation. First, find some way to burn off energy before you take him in a walk. Ideally, find a fenced in area where he can run loose and chase tennis balls or a flirt pole. If you don't have access to a fenced area, then try running him on a long line. What's perfect is if you can take two people and call the puppy back and forth between you. Wait until he sits and give him a treat each time he comes. The running will tire him, and the sit will start teaching him the basics of polite greeting without jumping.

Once the puppy has blown through his first spurt of energy you can try walking him. Remember, he doesn't know how he is supposed to act. Leashes are new to him. He doesn't know the basics of leash manners. You need to teach him from the beginning. Start walking. Keep going if he walks nicely. Stop and plant yourself if he strains on the leash. Ignore his barking, his pulling, his tantrums. Wait until he stops pulling and looks back over his shoulder to see why you aren't moving. Then reward him by taking a step forward. Keep doing this until he figures out that he only gets to go forward when he stops pulling. You may only get a couple hundred feet. The goal isn't to walk the dog at this stage. Rather, it is to teach the dog how to behave on leash, so you can walk him comfortably later.

He may get frustrated and start chewing on you or the leash. Have a toy along that you can redirect him onto.
 

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I got disappointed when Annie first arrived home with me. It took her DAYS to learn sit, more than a WEEK to learn down. Now i laugh. Why was I so impatient, it doesnt matter with a puppy! Honestly? Those skills will come and be easier to teach with an older puppy. I have taught adult dogs 'down' with 3 sessions and maybe 10 treats, in total. Puppies are slower! Try a bit, but dont fuss if he doesnt figure it out this week, or even next. Learning to max training sessions to 3-5 reps was my big breakthrough with training Annie. More than that and we both got frustrated.

i usually walked Annie on a flexi as a baby. I didnt have a yard, and it allowed plenty of non pulling time before hitting the end of the leash, and time for puppy wandering. Our first walks were maybe 50 m, turn around, then me sitting on the porch with her wandering around the front yard, sniffing and hopping in snow banks. Her breeder had had her on a leash so she was really nicely behaved on leash, but cowpony and PTP's suggestions are good.

For now- enjoy the puppy days. Perfect housetraining can come later - just keep him off the carpet and buy some enzyme cleaner. Have a big, happy fuss in the yard when he figures it out. Take him places, expose him to new sights and sounds, and stuff him with treats- now is the time for socializing him to anything you want him to be happy to experience as an adult - people of all ages, places, sounds, kids, surfaces,etc. I used Annies kibble as treats when she was a baby so i could give her as many treats as i wanted while still giving her a balanced diet.

More pictures, please, of your new puppy? Puppies are much easier to appreciate when they arent at my house :)
 

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Aah standard poodle puppyhood, my shirts were torn, my arms were bloody , He was at his worst during this first phase, one day he lost many of his baby teeth and shortly after my shirts were no longer torn and he could take walks. I did use a collar on him and as he grew quickly I used a rubberized type pinch collar. Next time I would just go with a front clip harness. Practice in the house or in quiet area off lead. Lure train him to walk at your side. As he gets the idea you can put on his harness or collar & leash and practice this as well. Eventually he will be walking by your side. You can also start training a new thing each week, sit, mat training. I love mat training. Though we aren't as perfect as some dogs will remain on their mt until released, we've never gotten quite there. However when I feed him I say go to go mat and he will run there and be sitting while I put his food down and will not touch it until I say ok. Also the same walking in and out of doors he must sit while you step out then release him to follow you. All little things but they add up and training tires a dog much more than running them. You will get past this phase and have a lovely dog. My guy now has this new habit when I'm on the computer he will grab a ball and toss it at me or really anywhere then runs to his mat and sits until I get up and I toss the ball, which he is annoying me with now. LOL
 

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If your condo has a hallway entrance, you can play fetch with a ball to burn off energy.

After 3-4 sprints of 15-20 yards Basil would get tired and lose interest. It might be a good idea if you need a leash free safe space for puppy to run.
 

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If your condo has a hallway entrance, you can play fetch with a ball to burn off energy.

After 3-4 sprints of 15-20 yards Basil would get tired and lose interest. It might be a good idea if you need a leash free safe space for puppy to run.
I did something similar with my mini. I'd take her to the trash chute every evening, which made her puff up in a very serious way. She loved having that "job." Lol. Afterwards, I'd say OKAY GO! and she'd race to the end of the hall and back a couple of times.

The combination of routine and physical exercise was a perfect way to encourage evening settling.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
If your condo has a hallway entrance, you can play fetch with a ball to burn off energy.

After 3-4 sprints of 15-20 yards Basil would get tired and lose interest. It might be a good idea if you need a leash free safe space for puppy to run.
Yes I always let both the dogs run back to the condo off leash when we get off the elevator. It's a good idea to have him fetch a bit out there as well, especially when the weather gets bad.
 

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So he just isn't getting the house training thing, at all. He keep peeing within a second of coming back in the house. He just did it again on my son's bed when we had just taken him out a second ago. I am just lost. At this age I think most dogs especially bigger dogs are getting some clue. We are taking him out a ton but then he doesn't go and goes inside. I guess the only way is to maybe put him in his crate when he doesn't go and try again a half hour later, but then he will be spending most of his life in his crate :(.
 

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Do you know how the breeder or source you got him from handled bathroom issues? Did they use pee pads or start any training? Even though he's older, if he didn't start training until you got him, he just doesn't know yet. Also, just a suggestion, that maybe he shouldn't be allowed on your son's anymore of that tends to be a pattern of elimination. I feel for you. It takes time and lots of consistency! You can do it!
 

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So he just isn't getting the house training thing, at all. He keep peeing within a second of coming back in the house. He just did it again on my son's bed when we had just taken him out a second ago. I am just lost. At this age I think most dogs especially bigger dogs are getting some clue. We are taking him out a ton but then he doesn't go and goes inside. I guess the only way is to maybe put him in his crate when he doesn't go and try again a half hour later, but then he will be spending most of his life in his crate :(.
I've mentioned this before, but not sure if you replied: Are you following Ian Dunbar's methods? His potty training approach is simple and highly effective.


Also available online for free:



Be diligent for a few weeks before deciding if it's working or not.
 

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Discussion Starter #51
Do you know how the breeder or source you got him from handled bathroom issues? Did they use pee pads or start any training? Even though he's older, if he didn't start training until you got him, he just doesn't know yet. Also, just a suggestion, that maybe he shouldn't be allowed on your son's anymore of that tends to be a pattern of elimination. I feel for you. It takes time and lots of consistency! You can do it!
She had started him on crate training and going outside. And he will go in the crate, but now cries if someone isn't near him when he is in the crate. It hasn't just happened in my sons room and not allowing him in there wouldn't really work. His crate is in there beside the bed and I need his help with this. I am just fried. I am technically working from home but can't focus at all. The first few days he seems to be getting it but clearly that was just a fluke.
 

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I can't remember, is this your first puppy?

It's ok. He's 11 weeks old, torn away from his mom and siblings for the first time EVER, stuck in some strangers house where they have crazy rules about where he can pee. Seperation anxiety is normal - right now you and your son are his only safe harbours, and he wants to stick with you like glue. Teach him confidence and to trust that you will return, be gentle and understand that he can't help it, he's a baby who is lonely, and HE WILL GET IT EVENTUALLY.

If he was perfectly (or even mostly) housetrained at 11 weeks, days after coming home, you would have the puppy equivalent of one of those child prodigy musicians, performing complex musical pieces in public at age 6. Sure, some kids have that much self control and coordination, but most of them? nope. Expect to clean up a lot of puppy pee in the next few months, buy a big package of paper towels, and a large bottle of enzyme cleaner, and consider yourself to have an AWESOME puppy and lucky to live at home if you don't go through the paper towels or the enzyme cleaner in the next 4 months :) Annie would wait until I got home, and pee as I picked her up out of her crate in her excitement, or at the top of the stairs, or anytime she met a new person or dog. Truly, their bladders are not well developed until they are 6 months or so.

That being said - set him up for success. Get a second crate, or a playpen, and restrict where he can go so that he doesn't get a chance to rehearse undesireable behaviour, or pee on hard to clean items. Close doors to keep his living area small. All rugs picked up and put away for now. He can be in the bedroom crate at night, but stay in carpet free living areas in the day. It won't hurt him to be in a playpen for a few hours, napping or chewing while you do human things.

There are usually tons of crates and expens available on kijiji - it doesn't have to be a 48" adult sized crate, smaller works as an intermediate step if that's what you can find. Also - don't immediately come in when he pees. Have a party, go for a tiny walk. A lot of people make peeing the end of fun, here, have a treat, now we go inside. My girls peeing outside got much more reliable (and faster) when I started taking her for a small walk after peeing as a reward, then went inside. Do you have an enzyme cleaner to clean the smell away if he pees inside?

When do puppy classes start? If it's a few weeks away, perhaps consider getting a 1 hour "puppy startup" class with a local trainer to help work through reasonable expectations and how to set him up for success. I think a lot of the time we have this romantacized vision of "the perfect puppy" from looking at others, or especially from looking at youtube trainers. But honestly? I've never met a perfect puppy.
 

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I can't remember, is this your first puppy?

It's ok. He's 11 weeks old, torn away from his mom and siblings for the first time EVER, stuck in some strangers house where they have crazy rules about where he can pee. Seperation anxiety is normal - right now you and your son are his only safe harbours, and he wants to stick with you like glue. Teach him confidence and to trust that you will return, be gentle and understand that he can't help it, he's a baby who is lonely, and HE WILL GET IT EVENTUALLY.

If he was perfectly (or even mostly) housetrained at 11 weeks, days after coming home, you would have the puppy equivalent of one of those child prodigy musicians, performing complex musical pieces in public at age 6. Sure, some kids have that much self control and coordination, but most of them? nope. Expect to clean up a lot of puppy pee in the next few months, buy a big package of paper towels, and a large bottle of enzyme cleaner, and consider yourself to have an AWESOME puppy and lucky to live at home if you don't go through the paper towels or the enzyme cleaner in the next 4 months :) Annie would wait until I got home, and pee as I picked her up out of her crate in her excitement, or at the top of the stairs, or anytime she met a new person or dog. Truly, their bladders are not well developed until they are 6 months or so.

That being said - set him up for success. Get a second crate, or a playpen, and restrict where he can go so that he doesn't get a chance to rehearse undesireable behaviour, or pee on hard to clean items. Close doors to keep his living area small. All rugs picked up and put away for now. He can be in the bedroom crate at night, but stay in carpet free living areas in the day. It won't hurt him to be in a playpen for a few hours, napping or chewing while you do human things.

There are usually tons of crates and expens available on kijiji - it doesn't have to be a 48" adult sized crate, smaller works as an intermediate step if that's what you can find. Also - don't immediately come in when he pees. Have a party, go for a tiny walk. A lot of people make peeing the end of fun, here, have a treat, now we go inside. My girls peeing outside got much more reliable (and faster) when I started taking her for a small walk after peeing as a reward, then went inside. Do you have an enzyme cleaner to clean the smell away if he pees inside?

When do puppy classes start? If it's a few weeks away, perhaps consider getting a 1 hour "puppy startup" class with a local trainer to help work through reasonable expectations and how to set him up for success. I think a lot of the time we have this romantacized vision of "the perfect puppy" from looking at others, or especially from looking at youtube trainers. But honestly? I've never met a perfect puppy.
Well said! Exactly this!
 

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I can't remember, is this your first puppy?

It's ok. He's 11 weeks old, torn away from his mom and siblings for the first time EVER, stuck in some strangers house where they have crazy rules about where he can pee. Seperation anxiety is normal - right now you and your son are his only safe harbours, and he wants to stick with you like glue. Teach him confidence and to trust that you will return, be gentle and understand that he can't help it, he's a baby who is lonely, and HE WILL GET IT EVENTUALLY.

If he was perfectly (or even mostly) housetrained at 11 weeks, days after coming home, you would have the puppy equivalent of one of those child prodigy musicians, performing complex musical pieces in public at age 6. Sure, some kids have that much self control and coordination, but most of them? nope. Expect to clean up a lot of puppy pee in the next few months, buy a big package of paper towels, and a large bottle of enzyme cleaner, and consider yourself to have an AWESOME puppy and lucky to live at home if you don't go through the paper towels or the enzyme cleaner in the next 4 months :) Annie would wait until I got home, and pee as I picked her up out of her crate in her excitement, or at the top of the stairs, or anytime she met a new person or dog. Truly, their bladders are not well developed until they are 6 months or so.

That being said - set him up for success. Get a second crate, or a playpen, and restrict where he can go so that he doesn't get a chance to rehearse undesireable behaviour, or pee on hard to clean items. Close doors to keep his living area small. All rugs picked up and put away for now. He can be in the bedroom crate at night, but stay in carpet free living areas in the day. It won't hurt him to be in a playpen for a few hours, napping or chewing while you do human things.

There are usually tons of crates and expens available on kijiji - it doesn't have to be a 48" adult sized crate, smaller works as an intermediate step if that's what you can find. Also - don't immediately come in when he pees. Have a party, go for a tiny walk. A lot of people make peeing the end of fun, here, have a treat, now we go inside. My girls peeing outside got much more reliable (and faster) when I started taking her for a small walk after peeing as a reward, then went inside. Do you have an enzyme cleaner to clean the smell away if he pees inside?

When do puppy classes start? If it's a few weeks away, perhaps consider getting a 1 hour "puppy startup" class with a local trainer to help work through reasonable expectations and how to set him up for success. I think a lot of the time we have this romantacized vision of "the perfect puppy" from looking at others, or especially from looking at youtube trainers. But honestly? I've never met a perfect puppy.
no this isn’t my first puppy. I had a Maltese puppy years ago but for some reason she was super easy. Since then I have always adopted older rescue dogs and fostered many as well. I do have a pen set up as well as a crate. He mostly stays in his pen while I am working I have it beside my desk The bedrooms have carpets that can’t come up. Puppy classes are weeks away....0
 

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If the bedrooms are carpetted, would keep the doors closed at all times during the day to keep the puppy out. You really don't want them having too large of an area, or they start deciding that "that corner out of sight" is a good potty area. If he sleeps in the crate in the bedroom, maybe put a scrap of vinyl flooring under the door of the crate in case he pees as he gets out, and carry him to and from the crate until he's more reliable.

Potty training an adult dog is a completely different kettle of fish than a puppy - we had one show up at our house that we potty trained perfectly in 2 days. A puppy? Highly unlikely.
 

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I think a lot of the time we have this romantacized vision of "the perfect puppy" from looking at others, or especially from looking at youtube trainers. But honestly? I've never met a perfect puppy.
Speaking of YouTube trainers, my personal source of puppy fever relief:


He does a good job of balancing the good with the not so good--I think Inertia even has accidents on camera a couple of times. Good reality check.
 

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Speaking of YouTube trainers, my personal source of puppy fever relief:


He does a good job of balancing the good with the not so good--I think Inertia even has accidents on camera a couple of times. Good reality check.
Intertia's resource guarding episode was SUCH a relief. I love this series. And Zak's Instagram account is fantastic, too. It was timed so nicely with Peggy's puppy progress (or lack thereof).
 

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Seriously, get and read the Ian Dunbar books before you drive yourself crazy. You have a canine toddler. It will turn into a canine child, and then a canine teenager. Bigger, more destructive. Dunbar's books will be immensely helpful in getting you through these stages.
 

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Seriously, get and read the Ian Dunbar books before you drive yourself crazy. You have a canine toddler. It will turn into a canine child, and then a canine teenager. Bigger, more destructive. Dunbar's books will be immensely helpful in getting you through these stages.
ok I will. argh, you are right he is just going to get bigger and that scares me a bit.
 

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I've mentioned this before, but not sure if you replied: Are you following Ian Dunbar's methods? His potty training approach is simple and highly effective.


Also available online for free:



Be diligent for a few weeks before deciding if it's working or not.
Thanks, I will check these out.
 
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