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Discussion Starter #21
We just entered (or re-entered) the world of puppy hood about a month ago when we brought our 8 week old Spoo home. Just wanted to encourage you with the bonding thing. It is a lot of work having a puppy. They are exhausting and, in many ways, a huge life disruption. Putting on top of that that it takes time to bond, it's the perfect recipe to feel the "puppy blues". I remembered feeling that way 5 years ago when we got our shih tzu puppy, so was prepared to work through it. I did have occasional bouts with "did we make a good choice" with our Spoo as well in the last month. But it has only been when I was frustrated. Now, a month later, I can see that myself, my husband, and my kids have all bonded to Dixie. Our shih tzu has accepted her. It will get better! It just takes time!

One thing that helped me bond with Dixie is training her. She has gone from completely ignoring me, to knowing sit, shake, down, working on speak and leash training... And teaching her eye contact with me has helped with all of that. There is also something bonding about her eyes looking at me and seeing the smart, obedient future dog we'll have if we don't give up. Really though, she is the smartest and easiest puppy we've ever had, but it still took time to bond and it's still hard work.

It will come. Give yourself and your pup time
yes I have been trying to train but he seems quite clueless. He isn’t good in a leash so that is a struggle in itself but I have also been trying to teach sit but he totally ignored me for the most part. He has 11 weeks old. We are registered in a training course in a few weeks. I think my 16 year old is feeling the stress as well now whereas the first dayS he was all about helloing and now he just wants a break. Haha.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
I didn't feel bonded with my little boys for quite a while, several months to be honest. Puppies are adorable but as with any infant, human or poodle, they're inadvertently selfish. It's up to the humans to help them thru this still helpless period. He's been uprooted from everything familiar and has no feeling of Home until he adjusts.

As for housetraining, soft surfaces are an accidental target. For true control, their urinary and GI systems will not be mature til they're around 6 months old. They'll understand the concept of eliminating where you designate far sooner than they'll be able to physically hold that urge. Until they recognize what that urge is, and are able to hold it, you won't have a housetrained pup. He'll likely need to go asap after waking up, after eating/drinking, after napping, after playing, basically after any activity - even resting ones.

What is he biting and what is your response to it? What is the craziness you see?
I know it's very early days here, and everything is new to you all, but if you'd describe your planned daily routine for him, there might be some things we can suggest.
I think he is strange. He doesn’t need to go right after eating or drinking. It is usually hours later. The craziness has been him going crazy trying to bite me. It’s like something just takes over him and he can’t stop. I try to replace myself with chew toys but not very successfully. Yesterday I put him in his play pen quite often. And then felt bad about it. Today I am working and although I work from home I am anticipating a stressful day. His pen area is right beside my work area so hopefully he will his chew (that’s all his seems to want to do) and I will be able to get some work done. We did take him to an empty beach area yesterday and he did have fun.
 

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I think he is strange. He doesn’t need to go right after eating or drinking. It is usually hours later. The craziness has been him going crazy trying to bite me. It’s like something just takes over him and he can’t stop. I try to replace myself with chew toys but not very successfully. Yesterday I put him in his play pen quite often. And then felt bad about it. Today I am working and although I work from home I am anticipating a stressful day. His pen area is right beside my work area so hopefully he will his chew (that’s all his seems to want to do) and I will be able to get some work done. We did take him to an empty beach area yesterday and he did have fun.
Tired puppies are bitey puppies without self control. Puppies need A LOT of sleep at that age - like 18 hrs. If Annie got bitey, i made her have a nap.

As for bonding - it will come. I wasnt in love with Annie for a few months either. It was like, nice puppy, good puppy but not MY puppy. I imagine its like an arranged marriage - you wouldnt expect to instantly love a new person who you have never met before and suddenly comes into your house and disrupts everything, right? Puppies are IMO similar. And honestly, the first few weeks are so busy and sleepless and that doesnt help either!
 

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There is also something bonding about her eyes looking at me and seeing the smart, obedient future dog we'll have if we don't give up.
I felt this, too, as I initially struggled to bond with Peggy. We took a big leap forward together once our groomer shaved her face—something we'd vowed to never do. Even a year later, I need her face shaved to really "get" her. The eyes truly are the window to the poodle's soul. :)
 

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I don't remember if you also have a crate for him to be near you and family but slightly removed from the activities, covered so it's dark and sounds are a bit muffled, to help induce relaxation.

It's not unusual for new owners to not realize how much sleep and napping a young pup still needs. It seems like they have energy to burn, but they're actually running on adrenaline. Think crying, cranky infant and go for the nap

This is more or less my schedule with my boys when they were around the same age. I'm a night owl so after the first AM up and out, we all went back to sleep for a bit:

9-930a
They get up and we go out. We'd be out for a few extra minutes then back in for breakfast, outside again then back to their condo's to sleep some more.
11-11:30a
We all get up. We go back out. We stay out a while and play. We come back in and play and train a bit. They crash and nap a bit. This is in a second crate on the main level. Tethering to me wasn't possible with two so we used gates to corral them to the two rooms we spent the most time in, the family room and the kitchen. They were always in sight.
1pm
Up and out again, lunch, back out for a while and we play and train. Back inside and we have some hang out time.
3pm
Harness up and take a walk around the neighborhood. Back in for a nap again. Back out after waking then hanging out while I do stuff. A bit more play/train time is in here too.
7pm
Dinner then outside then back in and hang out. They're wrestling and playing with each other now and thru the day as well as part of their play time. We wind down by about two hours before bedtime.They eventually crash.
10p or later
Out one more time then up to bed
 

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He doesn’t need to go right after eating or drinking.
Have you had him to your vet for a wellness check? It's unusual for a puppy not to need to go frequently.
I also don't remember if you have an accessible yard area but I'd still keep taking him out at least every two hours and after any eating, drinking, playing, resting. By doing this, and offering encouragement every time he does go "Good Boy! Good Potty!" or whatever phrases you choose to use for eliminations, you can train him to eventually "go" on command. That turns out to be an incredibly helpful tool.
 

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yes I have been trying to train but he seems quite clueless. He isn’t good in a leash so that is a struggle in itself but I have also been trying to teach sit but he totally ignored me for the most part. He has 11 weeks old. We are registered in a training course in a few weeks. I think my 16 year old is feeling the stress as well now whereas the first dayS he was all about helloing and now he just wants a break. Haha.
My daughter, who has been dreaming of a Spoo for months, was a super helper the first 2 days. And then she hit a wall... Was tired from interrupted sleep and interrupted play... So I can relate to the feeling of the kids losing their stamina in helping with a puppy very quickly. :)

Our pups are about the same age. Our Dixie's birthday is July 12, so she's just about 12 weeks old. We've had her almost a month.

The first few days were all excitement. Then I hit a slump of "this is so much work and all of my help is bowing out" lol. Puppy blues was off and on the next 2 weeks. But as Dixie's personality started shining through... And showing glimmers that she was learning... And working on training, I can now say we are truly bonded. It took about 3 weeks.

It didn't mean we didn't love Dixie from the start... But we just didn't really know her yet. And she didn't know us. It's a learning process for everyone

You will get there! Be kind to yourself. Know that what you're feeling is perfectly normal!!! Excited to hear more! Keep us posted!
 

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It's not unusual for new owners to not realize how much sleep and napping a young pup still needs. It seems like they have energy to burn, but they're actually running on adrenaline. Think crying, cranky infant and go for the nap
I wish puppies came with this warning label!

To get the necessary 18-20 hours of sleep per day, puppies need some help from their humans:

Puppies need a quiet place to snooze, and should never be woken up from a nap. Exercise should be in the form of off-leash play and exploration, ideally on a grassy surface. Leashes are just a safety device, to be used on sniffy "noodling" walks, the pace of which should always be set by puppy. Training at that age is mostly just gentle impulse control (e.g. treats instantly appear when all four paws are on the floor!) and learning to self-soothe/settle quietly with a chew. One sunset zoomie to drain the battery is okay, but evening is the witching hour for puppies; routine helps. So does patience.

This is a rare time when I think it's helpful to anthropomorphize our dogs a bit. You don't expect a toddler to sit in a classroom. You don't take a toddler for a jog when he's sleepy and cranky. You don't get angry with a toddler when he pees in his diaper. And while you may get frustrated, you don't punish a fussy toddler; you help them communicate their needs and then you meet those needs.

Etc. :)

Jenna, I'm probably just repeating things you've already read, but I needed daily reminders when I was deep in puppydom. Seeing my needle-toothed puppy as an innocent babe really helped.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
My daughter, who has been dreaming of a Spoo for months, was a super helper the first 2 days. And then she hit a wall... Was tired from interrupted sleep and interrupted play... So I can relate to the feeling of the kids losing their stamina in helping with a puppy very quickly. :)

Our pups are about the same age. Our Dixie's birthday is July 12, so she's just about 12 weeks old. We've had her almost a month.

The first few days were all excitement. Then I hit a slump of "this is so much work and all of my help is bowing out" lol. Puppy blues was off and on the next 2 weeks. But as Dixie's personality started shining through... And showing glimmers that she was learning... And working on training, I can now say we are truly bonded. It took about 3 weeks.

It didn't mean we didn't love Dixie from the start... But we just didn't really know her yet. And she didn't know us. It's a learning process for everyone

You will get there! Be kind to yourself. Know that what you're feeling is perfectly normal!!! Excited to hear more! Keep us posted!
I think our poodles are exactly the same age. My boys bday is July 11 but he didn’t come to me until 4 days ago. Today is a rough day. He peed on his bed right after I had taken him out. He was so easy the first few days but I guess that was just the honeymoon phase. I thought at his age he might have a bit more of a clue and be catching on to house training. My older toy poodle is upset and also now deciding she isn’t housetrained either. Argh. He has been really good in his crate but today started whining and barking while in there. I hope this isn’t the beginning of issues in the crate:(. So far that has been the really good part is that he was quiet in the crate and seemed to adjust well to that. I am trying to just take a breath and realize feeling overwhelmed is normal.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Have you had him to your vet for a wellness check? It's unusual for a puppy not to need to go frequently.
I also don't remember if you have an accessible yard area but I'd still keep taking him out at least every two hours and after any eating, drinking, playing, resting. By doing this, and offering encouragement every time he does go "Good Boy! Good Potty!" or whatever phrases you choose to use for eliminations, you can train him to eventually "go" on command. That turns out to be an incredibly helpful tool.
no I live in a condo. I do have a small outdoor area. But it is connected to other ground floor condos. But I have always used it for my dogs and now he is going out there as well. It isn’t fenced though. He does need to go frequently but not quickly. Like I will give him water and take him out shortly after and he never goes. Sometimes not till a few hours later.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
I wish puppies came with this warning label!

To get the necessary 18-20 hours of sleep per day, puppies need some help from their humans:

Puppies need a quiet place to snooze, and should never be woken up from a nap. Exercise should be in the form of off-leash play and exploration, ideally on a grassy surface. Leashes are just a safety device, to be used on sniffy "noodling" walks, the pace of which should always be set by puppy. Training at that age is mostly just gentle impulse control (e.g. treats instantly appear when all four paws are on the floor!) and learning to self-soothe/settle quietly with a chew. One sunset zoomie to drain the battery is okay, but evening is the witching hour for puppies; routine helps. So does patience.

This is a rare time when I think it's helpful to anthropomorphize our dogs a bit. You don't expect a toddler to sit in a classroom. You don't take a toddler for a jog when he's sleepy and cranky. You don't get angry with a toddler when he pees in his diaper. And while you may get frustrated, you don't punish a fussy toddler; you help them communicate their needs and then you meet those needs.

Etc. :)

Jenna, I'm probably just repeating things you've already read, but I needed daily reminders when I was deep in puppydom. Seeing my needle-toothed puppy as an innocent babe really helped.
Yes for sure. I am trying so hard to not get too frustrated. I told my son not to worry once he is housetrained we will have our carpets professionally cleaned. Haha.
 

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Yes for sure. I am trying so hard to not get too frustrated. I told my son not to worry once he is housetrained we will have our carpets professionally cleaned. Haha.
Is it possible to keep puppy off the carpets? Soft stuff was the only thing Peggy peed on. I'm guessing it was a tactile memory thing, from pee pads during early days at her breeder's house.
 

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He peed on his bed right after I had taken him out.
This could be because it's soft. (Lots of people avoid puppy beds for this reason.) But it could also be because he needed a little activity to stimulate his bladder. This is the case for bowels, too.

People will carry their puppy outside, stand around, and give up, and then the playful trot back inside is enough to jostle out an accident.
 

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I think our poodles are exactly the same age. My boys bday is July 11 but he didn’t come to me until 4 days ago. Today is a rough day. He peed on his bed right after I had taken him out. He was so easy the first few days but I guess that was just the honeymoon phase. I thought at his age he might have a bit more of a clue and be catching on to house training. My older toy poodle is upset and also now deciding she isn’t housetrained either. Argh. He has been really good in his crate but today started whining and barking while in there. I hope this isn’t the beginning of issues in the crate:(. So far that has been the really good part is that he was quiet in the crate and seemed to adjust well to that. I am trying to just take a breath and realize feeling overwhelmed is normal.
That's so cool our pups are the same age... Even though we've had ours a few weeks longer. We also have an adult dog in our home, a 5 year old shih tzu, who is adjusting to the new pup. We haven't had any problems with him marking around the house in the presence of the new pup, but it is taking him time to adjust. He was really mopey and not himself for almost 2 weeks. I was kind of worried (on top of the puppy blues) that I was wrecking my adult dog. He is coming around though. He's back to his normal interactions with me and is playing with Dixie, although sometimes he has to show her he's boss... Which he needs to do quickly because at 14 pounds, she's almost bigger than he. Hopefully your toy will adjust just fine too, eventually. But I get it... It's kind of a difficult adjustment for everyone.

As far as training, I use clicker training and have found it to work great at reinforcing good behavior at the exact moment it happens. I use it for potty breaks too. She hears the click as soon as she starts going, and knows she's going to get a treat before she even finishes. :)
 

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Puppies are whiny, bitey, hellacious little pee factories. They are babies. Like all babies, they are needy, selfish, and demanding. What you need -sleep, an uninterrupted meal, intact skin - has no significance in their thoughts. Their motto is Me Me Me. Lucky for them they are cute. Lucky for us they grow up into dogs.

It took me a long time to start to bond with Galen. I think my first truly affectionate feelings towards him were when he was around five months. Prior to that I was enduring the relationship, treating him kindly because it was the right thing to do, telling myself things would get better. Indeed, things have gotten better. As he matures he's becoming more in tune with my feelings and more able to interact instead of just demand. He's really a very good puppy.

Regarding the carpets, one of the best gifts I got myself was a Bissell carpet cleaner. I've more than recouped the cost in what I would have spent hiring professionals or renting a machine. Plus I can deal with the mess on my schedule, before the smell or stain sets into the carpet. Last night I hauled it out to take care of a pee spot in front of my dresser.
 

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Regarding the carpets, one of the best gifts I got myself was a Bissell carpet cleaner
Natures Miracle or some other type of enzyme cleaner is helpful in removing the "reminders" for the pup, too. I used it in the carpet cleaner as an after shampoo second step.
Also in the laundry for anointed items.
 
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Discussion Starter #38
Puppies are whiny, bitey, hellacious little pee factories. They are babies. Like all babies, they are needy, selfish, and demanding. What you need -sleep, an uninterrupted meal, intact skin - has no significance in their thoughts. Their motto is Me Me Me. Lucky for them they are cute. Lucky for us they grow up into dogs.

It took me a long time to start to bond with Galen. I think my first truly affectionate feelings towards him were when he was around five months. Prior to that I was enduring the relationship, treating him kindly because it was the right thing to do, telling myself things would get better. Indeed, things have gotten better. As he matures he's becoming more in tune with my feelings and more able to interact instead of just demand. He's really a very good puppy.

Regarding the carpets, one of the best gifts I got myself was a Bissell carpet cleaner. I've more than recouped the cost in what I would have spent hiring professionals or renting a machine. Plus I can deal with the mess on my schedule, before the smell or stain sets into the carpet. Last night I hauled it out to take care of a pee spot in front of my dresser.
This is how I feel too. Like I am just sucking it up because it is the right thing to do. I took him and my senior toy girl to the beach tonight and found it so stressful. Off leash (In a secluded beach area) it was fine but on the leash is such a nightmare. He pulls and trieS to jump on the smaller dog and doesn’t listen at all. I have treats with me and he just pulls the whole time. I am going to have to start walking them separately as it is just too hard walking them both. I actually do have a mini carpet cleaner but it doesn’t do much. I was so happy when my son got home and he could take the dog for a bit. I feel like a bad person I have been waiting for him for ages and now just feel like I am a basket of stress. I dread walking him. I tried a harness and that is no better than the normal leash. I suppose maybe one of those leashes that go around the mouth is what I will try next.
 

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That's so cool our pups are the same age... Even though we've had ours a few weeks longer. We also have an adult dog in our home, a 5 year old shih tzu, who is adjusting to the new pup. We haven't had any problems with him marking around the house in the presence of the new pup, but it is taking him time to adjust. He was really mopey and not himself for almost 2 weeks. I was kind of worried (on top of the puppy blues) that I was wrecking my adult dog. He is coming around though. He's back to his normal interactions with me and is playing with Dixie, although sometimes he has to show her he's boss... Which he needs to do quickly because at 14 pounds, she's almost bigger than he. Hopefully your toy will adjust just fine too, eventually. But I get it... It's kind of a difficult adjustment for everyone.

As far as training, I use clicker training and have found it to work great at reinforcing good behavior at the exact moment it happens. I use it for potty breaks too. She hears the click as soon as she starts going, and knows she's going to get a treat before she even finishes. :)
My girl is super old. She is 14 and has no teeth. She is a rescue that I have had for a couple years now. I did buy a clicker but have been too stressed to even try it. I feel like he has no desire to listen to me at all. I know I need to start just doing it.
 

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I feel like a bad person I have been waiting for him for ages and now just feel like I am a basket of stress. I dread walking him. I tried a harness and that is no better than the normal leash. I suppose maybe one of those leashes that go around the mouth is what I will try next.
He just doesn't know what's expected of him yet. :) Leashed walks aren't good exercise for puppies unless you're going to let them explore at their own pace.

To actually teach loose-leash walking, we work primarily off-leash. If you can't get puppy to walk nicely beside you without a leash, it's only going to be worse when you clip the leash on.

If you do need to work on-leash, it's going to be slow so prepare yourself. Whenever there's tension on the leash, stop. As soon as there's slack, take a step. Five minutes of this and you'll both probably be over it. But have faith: Puppy's learning the sensation of the leash hanging down and will eventually learn that means fun forward movement.

Do you have a training method you're following?
 
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