Poodle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 41 Posts

Registered
Joined
1,659 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
When I get my next dog breed I would like it to be a well rounded dog that I can do sports with and a lot of different activities with. Hey, this also tell me a bit more of what I want for my next dog!馃榾 I won't get another dog anytime soon. I want my own place to live, so that training and socializing will go by A LOT smoother this time. I'm going to start school soon to become a Occupational Therapist and need dogs who can help, because I also want to train dogs to help people later too when I become a much better handler and trainer.
 

Registered
Joined
1,315 Posts
There are plenty of breeds that can do anything but I would make a couple points. First, not every individual of every breed can "do everything." Some poodles are great at dock diving and others won't set foot in water. Some border collies are great at herding while others have no interest in sheep. Some labs won't retrieve. A lot of it has to do with picking a puppy from lines that suits what you want to do with it. Even then it often fails. Many herding dogs are too nervy or reactive to compete in sports even when selected from agility lines.

Second, some dog breeds are jack-of-all-trades but masters of none. Poodles are one I would put in this category. Also some of the other retrievers. These are good dogs. If you're looking for a well rounded dog that you can do lots of different activities with, they're good choices. But they're not specialists and they're not going to be the best at doing anything.

Third, there's a saying in agility that the best dog for agility is the one you have. What this means is that you're better off working with the dog you already live with than going out and getting a dog specifically for a sport. You'll be more successful and have more fun working with a partner you already have a relationship with, and then maybe later after you know the ins and outs of your sport you can consider it when getting your next dog. Another saying is that when selecting a dog for agility, you want to pick the one you can live with for the other 23 hours of the day! It's true.

My recommendation, if you really want to get another dog to train and do sports with... is a labrador from working lines. I honestly think that they have the greatest chances of being both a dog you can live with and a dog that will excel reasonably well at most sports aside from protection sports and lure coursing. Labradors are low maintenance, and working line labs are drivey and perfect for dog sports. They are also the most popular service dog breed for a reason. They're harder to screw up than poodles are. Stonnie Dennis says working with working line labradors is similar to working with malinois in terms of their drive and trainability. Another thing about them is they're much less likely to exhibit behaviors that will cause you problems. Herding dogs tend to have protection instincts and are heavily influenced by movement. They tend to have more human wariness, excessive barking, car chasing, and child nipping. They're great dogs but may require more training due to these tendencies. I think it's better to stack the deck in your favor with a retriever. Possibly a golden, but it's much harder to find good working line goldens.
 

Registered
Joined
1,659 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
There are plenty of breeds that can do anything but I would make a couple points. First, not every individual of every breed can "do everything." Some poodles are great at dock diving and others won't set foot in water. Some border collies are great at herding while others have no interest in sheep. Some labs won't retrieve. A lot of it has to do with picking a puppy from lines that suits what you want to do with it. Even then it often fails. Many herding dogs are too nervy or reactive to compete in sports even when selected from agility lines.

Second, some dog breeds are jack-of-all-trades but masters of none. Poodles are one I would put in this category. Also some of the other retrievers. These are good dogs. If you're looking for a well rounded dog that you can do lots of different activities with, they're good choices. But they're not specialists and they're not going to be the best at doing anything.

Third, there's a saying in agility that the best dog for agility is the one you have. What this means is that you're better off working with the dog you already live with than going out and getting a dog specifically for a sport. You'll be more successful and have more fun working with a partner you already have a relationship with, and then maybe later after you know the ins and outs of your sport you can consider it when getting your next dog. Another saying is that when selecting a dog for agility, you want to pick the one you can live with for the other 23 hours of the day! It's true.

My recommendation, if you really want to get another dog to train and do sports with... is a labrador from working lines. I honestly think that they have the greatest chances of being both a dog you can live with and a dog that will excel reasonably well at most sports aside from protection sports and lure coursing. Labradors are low maintenance, and working line labs are drivey and perfect for dog sports. They are also the most popular service dog breed for a reason. They're harder to screw up than poodles are. Stonnie Dennis says working with working line labradors is similar to working with malinois in terms of their drive and trainability. Another thing about them is they're much less likely to exhibit behaviors that will cause you problems. Herding dogs tend to have protection instincts and are heavily influenced by movement. They tend to have more human wariness, excessive barking, car chasing, and child nipping. They're great dogs but may require more training due to these tendencies. I think it's better to stack the deck in your favor with a retriever. Possibly a golden, but it's much harder to find good working line goldens.
Yeah, I can't expect every dog from a breed to be good at everything. I should have just said that I will be looking for a well rounded dog that I can do a lot of different activities with. It's going to be a long time before I get a second dog too. Time for a thread edit!! Okay, thank you! I have heard really great things about working line Labs. I have never seen a Golden from working lines.
 

Registered
Joined
349 Posts
Golden are great working dogs and they are exceptional in obedience and love to take part in activities, they can also make good therapy dogs. They aren鈥檛 highly popular here the show ones are but working ones aren鈥檛 common.
What about The English cocker or English springer spaniels, do you get the working types in the US?
 

Super Moderator
Joined
4,354 Posts
A well-bred Golden is pure magic. I wish they weren't so rare around here. Same with Cocker Spaniels. Some very unscrupulous breeders have been churning out neurotic examples of both for decades now. :(

I think standard poodles fit your criteria well. I struggle to think of many things they can't do. And hypoallergenic dogs are really the best fit for therapy environments.

Since you've struggled with Sisko's strength sometimes, maybe a mini would be a nice addition?
 

Registered
Joined
3,530 Posts
My opinion is a lab or a golden. I know several and have had friends that have had both and their dogs were both all certified therapy dogs. My one friend has had 4 golden, all certified therapy dogs, none of her goldens came from "working" lines. I think a golden is a good all purpose dog, as well as labs. Our lab we had when my children were young almost trained herself.
 

Registered
Joined
837 Posts
I would also suggest Golden retrievers. I wasn't a fan, but recently have met a few very nice ones, and I see why they are so popular. SO friendly, so eager to please, relatively smart, and just "DO THINGS WITH YOU NOW". I'm not personally a lab fan (there are a lot in my family, and I think they pant loudly, have no understanding of their body size/position, and smell!)
 

Registered
Joined
1,362 Posts
I love goldens, but I would worry about the shedding if you are wanting to train your new pet to be a therapy dog. I love all dogs, but I would struggle being around a dog that sheds a lot...you might have clients that feel the same. I think a standard poodle with the right personality would be a better fit. I think a mini might be too small for safety reasons.

Also wanted to add that you are choosing a really great career field! I've worked with some really great OTs in my profession. Very challenging but rewarding career path with lots of job options.
 

Super Moderator
Joined
1,256 Posts
My recommendation, if you really want to get another dog to train and do sports with... is a labrador from working lines. I honestly think that they have the greatest chances of being both a dog you can live with and a dog that will excel reasonably well at most sports aside from protection sports and lure coursing. Labradors are low maintenance, and working line labs are drivey and perfect for dog sports. They are also the most popular service dog breed for a reason. They're harder to screw up than poodles are. Stonnie Dennis says working with working line labradors is similar to working with malinois in terms of their drive and trainability. Another thing about them is they're much less likely to exhibit behaviors that will cause you problems. Herding dogs tend to have protection instincts and are heavily influenced by movement. They tend to have more human wariness, excessive barking, car chasing, and child nipping. They're great dogs but may require more training due to these tendencies. I think it's better to stack the deck in your favor with a retriever. Possibly a golden, but it's much harder to find good working line goldens.
Ironically, you have pretty much described why the original Labradoodles were bred. The foundation stock was from a line of proven service dogs; the intent was to keep the service dog characteristics from the retriever line while introducing poodle hair. Then, of course, the puppy millers jumped in.
 

Registered
Joined
1,315 Posts
Ironically, you have pretty much described why the original Labradoodles were bred. The foundation stock was from a line of proven service dogs; the intent was to keep the service dog characteristics from the retriever line while introducing poodle hair. Then, of course, the puppy millers jumped in.
Yes, I get that. But I think that if we're talking about breeds other than poodles that fit the bill, I still think the other retrievers come out on top. We know that poodles all by themselves can make great service dogs without any other retriever mixed in.
 

Registered
Joined
1,659 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Golden are great working dogs and they are exceptional in obedience and love to take part in activities, they can also make good therapy dogs. They aren鈥檛 highly popular here the show ones are but working ones aren鈥檛 common.
What about The English cocker or English springer spaniels, do you get the working types in the US?
That's really interesting. I'm sure we have the working type English Cocker and English Springer Spaniels in the US. I'll check
 

Registered
Joined
1,659 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
A well-bred Golden is pure magic. I wish they weren't so rare around here. Same with Cocker Spaniels. Some very unscrupulous breeders have been churning out neurotic examples of both for decades now. :(

I think standard poodles fit your criteria well. I struggle to think of many things they can't do. And hypoallergenic dogs are really the best fit for therapy environments.

Since you've struggled with Sisko's strength sometimes, maybe a mini would be a nice addition?
Yeah 馃様 there is only one Golden that I have seen that has like the best temperament.

They would probably be the best fit for me too. I struggle to think of anything they can't do too.

I have struggled with Sisko's strength sometimes, but it has gotten a lot better and I think that if the puppy gets trained sooner then it will be fine, and I'm getting in shape. I have nothing against minis and would probably steal someone's 馃槅, but I like medium and up sized dogs the best for me.
 

Registered
Joined
1,315 Posts
Goldens are popular in agility. I have seen some nice smaller ones that I would have loved to have. You could probably look into those lines. I don't see any big advantage for labs over goldens. I just initially said labs because a good lab is easier to come by and they have a slightly lower maintenance coat. I do find most dogs to smell more than poodles, but the oily retriever coat isn't one I'm super fond of. But watching Stonnie Dennis I'm still impressed enough with his labs that I'd consider having one some day despite the coat.

I like English springers and cockers a lot, but spaniels tend to be incredibly high energy for the first few years. I would probably look for a dog a little more mellow in temperament for service work.

A Duck Tolling Retriever would be another good retriever breed, though also not as readily available as a lab.
 

Registered
Joined
327 Posts
Ditto on the goldens, they鈥檙e wonderful dogs. I think our local library has one and a mini poodle come to a reading hour, and there鈥檚 one just behind us that if you didn鈥檛 see it, you鈥檇 never know it was there. If you get one, make sure you check up on cancer history in the pedigree, they鈥檙e one of the most prone dogs to it. Also check for skin allergies鈥擨 met several people growing up whose dogs perpetually had sores on them :(.
 

Registered
Joined
349 Posts
Ditto on the goldens, they鈥檙e wonderful dogs. I think our local library has one and a mini poodle come to a reading hour, and there鈥檚 one just behind us that if you didn鈥檛 see it, you鈥檇 never know it was there. If you get one, make sure you check up on cancer history in the pedigree, they鈥檙e one of the most prone dogs to it. Also check for skin allergies鈥擨 met several people growing up whose dogs perpetually had sores on them :(.
Ichthyosis, parents can be tested for it
 

Registered
Joined
349 Posts
Oh, lovely! Sounds like your spoilt for choice now 馃榿 I would ask to visit the breeders of the breeds you are interested in, maybe when you meet and interact, asked questions you will have a clear preference. All are very similar but different and all are great dogs, I have grown up around all three breeds all the working types and had a golden myself, fantastic dogs.
 
1 - 20 of 41 Posts
Top