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Hi there,

my family and I are hoping to get a mini poodle soon (after much deliberation and worrying and waiting)

I have one final niggle that I cant seem to figure out on google. We will be getting a KC registered puppy but have a slight concern that breeders will be breeding for show and not pets and that temperament may suffer as a result.

Can anyone offer any words of wisdom on this? Also, we will be using doggy day care 2 days per week, does this breed tend to cope with that?

thanks

J x
 

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People who show their poodles are far more likely to emphasize good temperament. After all, a dog show is a very challenging atmosphere, so show dogs have to be calm and responsive in that environment. Furthermore, those breeders are going to test for hereditary diseases and try to breed those diseases out of their lines.

A person who breeds for show usually knows far more about the breed. They usually know a great deal about the puppies' parents, grand parents, and great-grandparents - even farther back. The show breeder will raise those puppies with plenty of stimulation and will provide a variety of experiences so the puppies will be confident and outgoing.

So my advice is to buy from a breeder who either shows or participates in dog sports. Such people tend to produce the best puppies.
 

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Oh! And I had a dear dog Gracie who was half minipoo. Best dog in the world—affectionate, funny, and so very clever—but absolute velcro. She'd have fallen to pieces at daycare.

I did eventually find an exceptional dog walker, whom Gracie and I both loved. But ultimately I just started taking her to work with me and she truly blossomed.

I'd be very choosy with my daycare facility, and start out slow and early.
 

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That makes sense. I went to visit a puppy a few days ago from very good lines, although the dam was of show standard the owner didn't show her as she said the dam didn't like it. She also hid behind the breeder most of the time we were there. Should that worry me in terms of temperament? The puppy wasn't the most outgoing in the bunch, he did join in but also took himself of for a bit of peace!
 

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Breeding for temperament

Hi there,

my family and I are hoping to get a mini poodle soon (after much deliberation and worrying and waiting)

I have one final niggle that I cant seem to figure out on google. We will be getting a KC registered puppy but have a slight concern that breeders will be breeding for show and not pets and that temperament may suffer as a result.

Can anyone offer any words of wisdom on this? Also, we will be using doggy day care 2 days per week, does this breed tend to cope with that?

thanks

J x
Our mini puppy Kiki came from a breeder who breeds showdogs, but also for healthy poodles with wonderful temperaments. We visited her in her home, and her poodles were very outgoing with lovely personalities - and were champion show dogs. Both of Kiki's parents are champions, and she has a wonderful temperament - very calm, yet energetic and playful, happy, and outgoing. I recommend that you look for a breeder who carefully socializes and handles the puppies, raises them in their home (not kennels), and who breeds for health and genetic diversity. Kiki loves other dogs and would do well in puppy daycare, but we have two other dogs at home, including our other miniature poodle Willow (1 1/2 years old), and don't feel the need to have her in care.

Good luck in your search!
 

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That makes sense. I went to visit a puppy a few days ago from very good lines, although the dam was of show standard the owner didn't show her as she said the dam didn't like it. She also hid behind the breeder most of the time we were there. Should that worry me in terms of temperament? The puppy wasn't the most outgoing in the bunch, he did join in but also took himself of for a bit of peace!
My minipoo was one of the puppies held back for conformation then they decided to go with her sister so I got her when she was almost a year old. My dog is related to Johanna’s Zoe who has her AKC championship and Johanna is now training her in other sports. The breeders were breeding for temperament as well as conformation.

If you look below my post you’ll see all the titles my Minipoo Babykins has earned. There is no way we could have accomplished that if my dog was neurotic. To perform in dog sports such as conformation means your dog has to be able to work well surrounded by many dogs and their handlers, and to be able to compete in many different locations. Poorly bred dogs may not have the temperament to tolerate such demands.

My dog loves dogs of all sizes, breeds, colors etc. she loves people including handicapped in wheelchairs or walkers etc. Her breeder did a fantastic job preparing these puppies to be happy and friendly. That takes extra effort that most backyard breeders probably aren’t aware about and greedy breeders wouldn’t bother with. I have friends raising their puppies using Puppy Culture protocols and other resources.

So yes, you want a breeder who is actively competing with her dog and who has chosen a sire who also has titles, whether in conformation or other dog sports. And who has done all the health testing on the parents before breeding.

If you came to my house, as a total stranger my dog would greet you and be happy for you to greet and pet her. She wouldn’t hide.

To me when someone says she isn’t showing her dog, and it’s hiding behind her, that’s a red flag that this dog has issues. Then you mention the puppy isn’t the most outgoing; given the mom’s behavior I would look elsewhere.
 

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My minipoo (8 months now) is from show parents and has the best temperament I've ever seen in a dog, though he's still a tad mouthy. Extremely confident, super friendly, rarely shows any fear. A little smidge of separation anxiousness but that is common for poodles. He is extremely dog friendly and he often gets to play with other dogs. If anything he's too dog friendly in that he will try to play with dogs that are too big and not safe for him to play with. He also is spectacular in that he is not too overbearing to other dogs and is relatively polite in greeting them. He would do well with daycare despite his anxiousness over me leaving him.

I would never get a puppy from a breeder if I wasn't 100% in love with the personality of the parents. When I got my pup, I met his mom and dad and they were both very friendly and outgoing. They immediately ran up to us to say hello with zero alert or fear behaviors. The pups will learn from their mother and they will pick up that timid behavior.

Selecting a breeder is an extremely important decision, not only because of who your puppy's parents will be, but also because the breeder is the one responsible for socializing your pup for his or her first 8-12 weeks. There's a lot of learning that needs to go on during that time. So it is worth it to find a breeder that will be best suited to producing the dog that best matches your life. I drove 12 hours to pick up my pup and definitely don't regret it! There is tons of great info on this site to help with selecting good breeders.
 

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Hi and Welcome!

You'll find a lot of good information in this thread about finding a puppy to suit your family:

https://www.poodleforum.com/5-poodle-talk/33522-buying-puppy-safely-basics.html

We are grateful to the breeders who do take the time and spend the money to show or compete and health test their dogs so we can have our healthy and well bred pets.

Things to ask breeders or look for on websites. I hope others will drop by with suggestions:

Volhard testing (temperament)

Socialization done prior to going to new home

Health testing on the dam and sire - OFA, CHIC (this is like having insurance that certain genetic issues will not be present in your pup)

Meeting the dam and other puppies in their home. A home environment is preferred for the best start.

-----------------------

What part of the world are you in? We can probably suggest breeders for you to contact, if for no other reason than to get a feel for quality breeders.

When you wrote "KC" registered was that meant to be "AKC"?

You mentioned doggy day care possibly two times a week. What age would you be starting that?

Have you raised a puppy before?

I know this may seem like a lot of questions to you but the more we know, the better we can answer your questions :).

Good luck in your puppy hunt!
 

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Good comments, Rose n Poos. I assumed when the OP said "KC" she (or he) lives in Great Britain - KC = Kennel Club; AKC = American Kennel Club.
Thanks Johanna for reminding me. Because I live in a suburb of the KC Metro area, provincial habit takes over, even when I know better than to assume and when totally out of context :).
 

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The first time I bought a pure bred dog (a cavalier king charles spaniel) the mother was a bit standoffish, and the father was a typical love everybody cavalier. My dog ended up being slightly standoffish, liked everybody but really did not want to sit on my lap. She did like to be nearby, usually on the floor. She was a lovely family dog for her whole life, and I have no regrets. However, going forward, I would never get a dog that I didn't think the parents were completely awesome.

Friendliness with people is very important to me as a pet owner. If it is important to you, I would advise against a puppy from a dam who is hid behind the breeder for an entire visit.

Good luck whatever you decide, and congratulations on choosing a poodle! I love this breed.
 

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This is all really useful advice, thank you. My instinct is that this pup is not for me but the breeder thought it wasn’t an issue so I was worried I was over reacting. I have also heard that cream coloured puppies are more highly strung. Any truth in that?
 

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I had a cream minipoo growing up - she was the sweetest, calmest, most even tempered dog. I don't think cream coloured dogs are more highly strung.
 

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This is all really useful advice, thank you. My instinct is that this pup is not for me but the breeder thought it wasn’t an issue so I was worried I was over reacting. I have also heard that cream coloured puppies are more highly strung. Any truth in that?
You are definitely not overreacting! I would not choose a puppy who had a shy parent. Both of my dogs have very friendly parents and they are friendly dogs. They learn so much from their mothers!

I have never heard of such a thing as cream having a more high strung temperament. I've never met a cream that had that temperament, in fact! Every one I've known, including my own, has had a fabulous, calm, sweet temperament.

ETA: Okay, not necessarily calm as in low energy, but calm as in not being high strung/neurotic.
 

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This is all really useful advice, thank you. My instinct is that this pup is not for me but the breeder thought it wasn’t an issue so I was worried I was over reacting. I have also heard that cream coloured puppies are more highly strung. Any truth in that?


My mini poo is cream and white, and he is the most amazing, calm dog. Yes he had energy when he was younger and still does love to play. He wasn’t anywhere near hyper though and it was really easy to activate his “off switch.”
 

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Our miniature poodle is almost 2 and is just the perfect dog. She'll let me know if she's bored, but is otherwise content to hang out, walk, play, or go with us anywhere based on our schedule and our wants. Definitely wait for the right puppy/dog personality for you. I didn't get to meet Jessie's parents, but I adopted her as an adult so I was able to see her personality directly.
 

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A young puppy usually won't have had much time or reason to develop fears, but they can be shy so decide on qualities you'd like in your pup when it's grown and then look for them when you meet the pups and their dam (and sire if he's there).

For example, when DH and I went to meet our future pups I wanted a confident, friendly pup with a bit of sass. DH wanted a sweet, friendly pup with confidence. We both wanted active and interested, but not hyper, pups. We went to the breeders and visited for about two hours. The available pups, their dam and sire, and a few extra family members of the breeders, including an infant, were all present.

After watching them all act and interacting with them and each other, and seeing that the two we ended up choosing also enjoyed playing with each other, we both ended up with the personalities we hoped for.

*** I'm NOT saying pick two LOL ***
 
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