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Discussion Starter #1
My Meeko. The one dog I've gotten from a breeder, is the one most highly medical needs dog that I've ever had. He's a Standard. So far, at 19 months, He's got extreme food intolerances, 2 Luxatting Patellas, 2 Partially torn ACL's, and is already having teeth issues, resulting in fillings and 2 tooth extractions. His breeder has been in contact through his diagnoses, and is upholding her end of our contract, so it's not the horrible experience it could be. But S#!T it's difficult having a baby who's needing so much work. Anyone else have special needs SPOOs? My other one, who's the same age, was given to me by a client who wanted to get rid of her. She's the perfect girl, other than not being show quality. But she's healthy, happy, and can do and eat anything.
 

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Sometimes you just get lucky..or unlucky. Sorry it has to be you. My boy has food allergies, but we caught then fairly early and he is doing well. Here;s hoping your boy will get all this bad stuff out of his system before he is two and then be the healthiest poodle alive!
 

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There are breeders and there are breeders. Did your breeder do all the tests recommending by the OFA for the breed or the Poodle Club tests at least? Some of the issues you mention seem to have a genetic link - whenever there is one of those I am disappointed because it would be nice if we could at least eliminate the ones that we know of before hand. Having just lost the dog love of my life at 4 years of age to seizures, which I was told over and over again were out of the blue, until I found that the dad and paternal grandmother both had them too, and his half brother started at the exact same age (4) only had them ever so slightly less violently. His half brother to my knowledge is still alive - on 4 different seizure meds and went from agility star to basically vegetative state - his owner can't let go even after spending close to 50k on keeping him alive.... Some things we DO expect from real breeders. If things go wrong at least we want to know they did everything they could to try to prevent it. I understand your disappointment completely.
 

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Thanks, Charmed. He will be getting a TPLO procedure done in each back leg before he's 4, guaranteed. I'm very blessed, however, to have an amazing vet.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Moni, I was told that they did do testing, but was new enough to buying from a breeder to not ask to see the results. I have been in contact with the breeder, however, and she holds firm that all of his problems are "congenital", and not carried down through the line. Supposedly, all of his lineage are completely healthy, other than him. He was also the runt, and emaciated when I got him.
 

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The problems with the luxating patellas would be directly related to the parents. Someone correct me if I am wrong. I would demand proof from the breeder that the parents are healthy, and if I were you, I would warn others about this breeder.
 

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Dogs4Life, I was informed by the breeder that his problems are congenital, and not genetic. I do not entirely believe that, but she is adhering to our contract as if they were genetic problems, for which I am grateful. From what I understand, the rest of the litter went on to grow up healthy, so I was just the lucky one. I am working on connecting with the owner of one of his litter mates, so I will be for sure asking her questions. Thank you!
 

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I don't understand why a puppy was emaciated? I don't think a reputable breeder would offer for sale an emaciated puppy. That should have been a red flag. But I'm sorry your boy has to go thru all these issues and you as well.
 

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How sad for you guys!! I am glad that your breeder is upholding her end of the contract. Maybe she will think twice before breeding again from that same line. Unfortunate things do happen, even from good breeders. But poor Meeko seems to have had a whole lot of things happen. It does seem unusual that she would place him in an emaciated state. Normally a breeder would hang on to such a puppy and not place them until they were completely well. I would be very frustrated in your situation. Good job in giving him the best care possible. And this is good education for anyone looking for a puppy from a breeder - always make sure the contract is solid, as yours was, and always research as much as you possibly can on the health of the lines and health testing performed.
 
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At the time that I got him, I had never had a puppy before, and didn't realize how skinny he was until I got him home and he didn't want anything offered to him. Since then, I have learned a lot about what to look for from a breeder, and am better prepared for my next experience. Looking back, there were many red flags, but hind sight is always 20/20. For now, Meeko got his second PRP done yesterday, so hopefully the inflamation in his knees will be reduced in the next few days, and then we will be scheduling a TPLO for over the summer, once it warms up. Fortunately, we have had pet insurance on him since I brought him home, so I won't be hurting too much financially. My main cause for anger in this situation is the fact that once he gets older, his quality of life may go downhill quickly. Pain medications make him sick, and his knees are always going to be a problem. So we are enjoying him while he is young, and doing everything in our power to give him the best chance possible for down the road.
 

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Here is a definition of the term congenital" "A congenital disorder is a medical condition that is present at or before birth. These conditions, also referred to as birth defects, can be acquired during the fetal stage of development or from the genetic make up of the parents." Here is the source for that definition. https://www.spine-health.com/glossary/congenital-disorder


What matters isn't the source (I wanted a medically decent definition), but what I bolded. It is important to understand that such issues as you are experiencing can have genetic components. Good on you for doing all that you can to make things right for sweet Meeko. I wish you the best.
 
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Thank you, Lily. I really appreciate the definition you found! I definitely think, and am supported in the believe by my veterinarians, that most or all of his issues are something caused by his genetics. We just got his second PRP done on his knees on Friday, so hoping for some relief for him in the next few days. However, during that procedure, I took a really good look at his teeth again. At the age of 11 months, we had to remove one of his canines. At the age of 16 months, one of his incisors had to go as well. At each extraction, they found a new enamel defect on a separate tooth, and sealed it. Now, he has a third defect. He has no toys harder than cloth or rubber, no bones or antlers, and now his enamel is chipping away. Pray hard for this guy, if you pray. He's falling apart, and my sanity is going with him.
 

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I think we are all with you and Meeko in spirit. I hope you can make progress with settling everything down for him. He is such a cute looking boy.
 

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I wonder, did he have any infections as a puppy? My adult teeth were badly affected by the tetracyclin I was given for tonsillitis as a toddler, to the extent that many were stained, and several so weakened they quickly crumbled away. A high fever can have a similar effect. Too late to avoid the impact if so, of course, but sometimes it can be helpful to have an explanation.
 

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fjm yes, tetracycline and related antibiotics are well known for damaging permanent teeth (discoloring and weakening enamel) when given to young children and pregnant women (so I don't see why the same might not be true for dogs).
 

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Discussion Starter #17
He was never sick with me, and the breeder didn't say anything about him being sick before that, but who knows. He never had distemper, and wasn't on antibiotics until after his adult teeth had come in, because his first tooth extraction resulted in a small infection. So no causes that we know of. He has never had a fever in the time that we've had him. From what I understand, the enamel is developed while still within the mom, so not sure of anything at this point. Thank you all!
 

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Yes adult dentition is formed prenatally (in all mammals).
 

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So sorry to hear of your struggles with Meeko. He is very fortunate to have landed with you where he will get the best quality of life possible. Not every owner goes the distance with a sick puppy/dog.
 

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Thank you, Carolinek. All of my dogs have been special needs (a total of 5 so far in my adult life), so when we were looking at getting Meeko, I was excited at the prospect of having at least ONE who would not have any medical needs until down the road. But I guess it is good that we got him instead of someone else. He certainly isn't a cheap one!
 
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