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I'm trying to understand how this social media site works. I have a 1 year old male Standard Poodle named Mac!!! He is the picture perfect perfection of what a standard poodle should be, and of course my best friend and protecter. I would love to stud him out but he is actually the first dog that's all mine. Any help or guidance would be wonderful!!!! Thanks Mac's mommy Erica.



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Welcome to PF to you and Mac. I hope you will find this to be a nice community (it is) but also understand that we all cherish not just our own poodles but the breed and we want to promote the best breeding possible. An introduction that says this is your first dog and that you want to stud him out raised my eyebrows and I suspect others will have similar reactions.



You can search around here for information on breeding, but please don't be so quick to decide on your own that he is worthy breeding stock. I urge you to go (without your dog) to some nearby conformation shows and see what kinds of standard poodles are being put up by the judges. Those dogs are being examined on many levels for their worthiness to be bred (not just looks, but temperament too). Then look at what health testing is needed for standard poodles before breeding. Hips cannot be given a full clearance until a dog is two years old. Once the testing is done then the results should be posted to OFFA and a CHIC registration number should be gotten. I also recommend that you seek a mentor to help you show your dog before you give the slightest further thought to breeding him. And last of all please don't add to the problems of being a back yard breeder.
 

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Welcome to you and Mac! Lily cd re covered nearly everything that I was thinking. As the owner of a show poodle myself, I can attest to all of the beautiful conformationally correct poodles out there in our breed. Find a mentor who shows their dogs. Get all of his health testing done before even entertaining the thought of breeding (including hips which cannot be done before age 2). You will find loads of wonderful poodle information here.
 

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Welcome to PF to you and Mac. I hope you will find this to be a nice community (it is) but also understand that we all cherish not just our own poodles but the breed and we want to promote the best breeding possible. An introduction that says this is your first dog and that you want to stud him out raised my eyebrows and I suspect others will have similar reactions.



You can search around here for information on breeding, but please don't be so quick to decide on your own that he is worthy breeding stock. I urge you to go (without your dog) to some nearby conformation shows and see what kinds of standard poodles are being put up by the judges. Those dogs are being examined on many levels for their worthiness to be bred (not just looks, but temperament too). Then look at what health testing is needed for standard poodles before breeding. Hips cannot be given a full clearance until a dog is two years old. Once the testing is done then the results should be posted to OFFA and a CHIC registration number should be gotten. I also recommend that you seek a mentor to help you show your dog before you give the slightest further thought to breeding him. And last of all please don't add to the problems of being a back yard breeder.


I'm sorry if you thought that came out as harsh, but my dog is my best friend in the whole world and he saved my life when my father passed away. I got him and i just don't even know how I've lived all this time without him. He goes every where with me and never lets me out of his sight. He's the smartest Dog I've ever known it took 4 times to teach him to sit. But with that being said Mac and I are super excited to become members of PF!!! I had no idea that something like this exsisted. I wasn't planning on breeding him and was going to get him nutered but his vet said that I should at least try once and when he turns 3 we will proceed. Our vet says that Mac is the absolute perfect Standard Poodle in every way. Health, looks, behavior, temperment.
There for I said hey I could definitely consider sharing the wealth since I am so blessed by him!!!! If everyone could have a dog like him a true best friend this world would be a better place and way more fun!! But thanks for your advice and I was not in any way trying to offend anyone. And I love Mac with all my heart he's all I got.


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Hi Erica, Welcome to you and Mac! Honey, all of us feel that our dogs are perfect--and they are perfect pets. It takes a LOT more to be a breeding candidate. Your vet knows nothing about the poodle breed standard. Vets know a lot about medicine, but they do not know anything about breed standards unless they show in conformation. I have no doubt that Mac is a perfect companion to you. He looks like a sweetheart. But breeding quality? No. Not until he has passed all health clearances and titled in conformation or companion/performance sports.
 

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ZM my vet would know about the poodle breed standard since he has had poodles all his life, but I agree most vets don't have much reason to know a breed standard unless they are actively involved with that breed. And yes any dog that is going to be bred should be titled in conformation and/or performance sports.
 

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Well my post didn't post...hmm anyway we all feel the same way about our poodles as you do, the being said we would have an awful lot of puppies just because we love our dog. You already received a lot of advise..you have to know genetic too when breeding..yes they should be shown to confirm their worthiness but also realize that there are health issues like progressive retinal atrophy, epilepsy, Addison's disease, thyroid issues, hypoglycemia, bloat, hip dysplasia that can occur in this breed. Knowing the history (background) of the dog is important. What if for instance your guy didn't come from health tested lineage and he got one of these issues..you would be devastated ...I have learned after being a long time dog owner that every breed has issues and your best bet is to get one that comes from a good healthy background. I don't want to have a constant worry that will it pop up on my dog..As a 1st time dog owner you will learn as many us have..that all dogs are not worthy to breed. Personally I wouldn't want a stud dog...been there...If your really interested in doing this learn all you can, get some titles on your dog to prove his worthiness. This is a great forum everyone shares what they have learned. Good luck in whatever you eventually decide.
 

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Mufar you raised a good point about dealing with living with a stud dog. I forget who it is that recently adopted a retired stud dog. One of their issues is urinary leaking. Then there is also the tendency to mark that is much stronger in dogs who have been bred and if there is a bitch in season anywhere nearby their desire to escape and go visiting for a quickie.


Our male dogs are intact, but haven't been bred and we don't have those issues.
 

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Very good points, Mufar. Frosty was very difficult to live with when he was intact--marking constantly and much more aggressive with other dogs. He turned into an angel overnight after being neutered!
 

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Welcome to you and Mac! Another way to “share the wealth” might be to get him certified as a therapy dog. He can bring joy to others as poodles always do.
 

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With kindness, please know if you proceed as planned without first objectively proving his quality and finding a responsible, well-reputed mentor, you will only have access to inferior bitches.

Should health issues arise in the puppies during their lives, you will be liable on a philosophical and, quite possibly, a financial basis. You will also be responsible to take in and provide for his offspring for life, if owners cannot or will not keep them, including due to medical problems.

A veterinarian, short of one in Poodles who exhibits or competes (now or in the past), may recognize some positive aspects of a dog, but s/he is not prepared to accurately determine whether any given Poodle is breeding-worthy. I'm just echoing several others at this point.

Imho, in this day and age, breeding should be done by those who are active students of their breeds, who have made extensive study of the genetics, the pedigrees and lines, and who have proven dogs and bitches in objective arenas. And who have, or now do, contribute(d) to their breeds via a regional (or national, or both) club, in some meaningful way.
 

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Welcome - other members of the forum have given you many things to think about before planning a breeding. This is sound information - please do not add to the problems of breeding dogs that have not been proven in the show ring, at agility or recognized in therapy.
 

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I know someone who is a decent small scale breeder of border collies. For her last litter she ended up not having buyers for two of the puppies. They are now her two year old dogs on top of the dogs she already had.

Also many states do have puppy/kitten lemon laws that hold breeders responsible for health problems of various sorts.
 
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Do you have the right to breed your dog? Quality breeders who are performing all the tests on their breeding stock, and who show their dogs in conformation and other dog sports have contracts that normally don't allow puppies sold to pet homes to be bred. If you don't have breeding rights for your dog, you won't be able to register any puppies born from that dog with AKC or other legitimate dog organization.

Mfmst has a wonderful suggestion - get your dog trained and tested for Therapy Dogs International or other pet therapy program. My dog is a therapy dog - we visit a nursing home and the people are thrilled when she visits. It's a most rewarding experience and the perfect way to share your dog with others.
 
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