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I have shared before on my pups patella problems. Sure would like to connect with someone who has been through this and has gone forward with surgery. Need someone to give me ideas on the do's and dont's. Anyone open to phone conversation to give some advice? Sure would help :) you can messaged me.
 

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Your last post was sounding like pretty good news. Has something else happened?

thank you all for responding. PT was Monday and she graded her a 1 on both knees. Will have PT once a week and I have 4 exercises to do with her to strengthen her back end. Xrays will be taken the first week of November. Vet recommended Coseqen (sp) DS. Any other suggestions??
 
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Your last post was sounding like pretty good news. Has something else happened?
Yes, took to another vet/surgeon for consult and it is grade 2 on left and 3 on right. I have decided to go with this last vet for surgery when growth plates are closed. They are closer and highly recommended from a friend.







s
 

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Have you spoken with @twyla?
yes, we are going to connect after Thanksgiving. I'm thankful that she reached out. this is very concerning to me and to be able to talk to someone who has dealt with it is a blessing. :)
 

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Below is an article I wrote about 10 or 11 years ago. If you are interested in learning ways to help locating Patellas NATURALLY, let me know.

"Luxating" is a fancy word for dislocating. Patella is your dog's "knee", the joint on the front of her/his hind leg. So a luxating patella is a dislocating knee or as some have nick named it; trick knee, a knee that keeps slipping out of its socket. This can happen in Boston Terriers and certain toy breeds with weak ligaments, tendons, and/or muscles. It can also happen other breeds in pups whose kneecap groove is too narrow or shallow. The knee usually slips inwardly, toward the body, and locks so that your dog can't bend her/his leg.

Does My Dog Have a Luxating Patella?
You might suspect a luxating patella if your dog sometimes lifts one hind leg while running, or if she/he often moves both rear legs at the same time, like a hopping bunny. Sometimes the knee slips only for a few moments and then slides back into place. Sometimes the knee slips out and stays out, and your Boston will hold her/his leg off the ground and limp, perhaps tucking the thigh into her/his body.

Luxation may occur in one knee, or in both. It is seen in many small breeds, and in both sexes. Even if the knees seem to be firm as puppies, it is not a bad idea to have have your dog's patellas checked every two years by your veterinarian.

Is luxation serious?
There are four degrees (grades) of luxation:
Grade I. The knee only slips out when the vet manipulates it.

Grade II. The knee luxates occasionally when the dog is walking or running. He/she may not seem to mind much, or they may shriek, but it usually slides back by itself as they continues moving. Or you can slip it back manually (ask the vet to show you how).

Grade III. The knee luxates frequently and causes chronic lameness. Even when you put it back manually, it doesn't seem to last long.

Grade IV. The knee luxates, stays that way, and you can't put it back into its socket. This grade is very rare but happens.

How is luxation treated?

* The first treatment should be to crate or keep the dog in a small area for a week or two and supervise all activity - no jumping or running.

* Most veterinarians will prescribe a Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (like Rimadyl or another NSAID). However, these will only hide the symptoms and may reduce some of the inflammation, but do absolutely nothing to strengthen or correct the condition.

* Some veterinarians will prescribe Steroidal anti-inflammatory medications. These have proven to be extremely damaging to the immune system, have awful side effects (short and long term), and in my opinion, should never be used.

*Surgery is seldom the answer and if needed, should only be done by an orthopedic surgeon if the dog is in chronic pain.

If you decide on surgery, please call the American College of Veterinary Surgeons at (301) 718-6504 and ask for a referral to an orthopedic specialist or college of veterinary medicine in your state.

If surgery is your choice, be aware that the dog may very likely have problems down the road with arthritis from the surgery. In the opinion of most veterinarians, surgery is overkill for Grade I or II luxating patella. I personally would only go with surgery on a Grade IV luxation, or on a Grade III that did not respond to natural treatment and the dog was in constant pain. Surgery costs around a thousand dollars per patella, it is uncomfortable for your dog, and there is a 50% chance that some degree of luxation will return at some point in time.
Dr. Jeannie Thomason, animal naturopath The Whole Dog.


I have shared before on my pups patella problems. Sure would like to connect with someone who has been through this and has gone forward with surgery. Need someone to give me ideas on the do's and dont's. Anyone open to phone conversation to give some advice? Sure would help :) you can messaged me.
 

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Surgery prices vary drastically depending on your location, it was 3 1/2 X what Genteel Poodles stating here in the northeast, for my girls cruciates tear and grade 3 patella surgery and 2 1/2 years later her grade 4 patella repair
 

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My neighbor has a yorkie, had both knees done. But she was in constant pain, and the knee wouldn't pop back in. It cost her $3000. and the bad part, she may require it again in future. She is only a 2 year old. I would limit my dogs activity to being on a leash with no jumping or stairs. I'd give her some time to see if her muscles become stronger with exercise nd I'd only do surgery when it becomes absolutely necessary. I agree a orthopedic vet should do it. My neighbors vet also has a orthopedic background and she was told her dogs condition is genetic and the person breeding should be notified not to further breed her pair.
 

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Below is an article I wrote about 10 or 11 years ago. If you are interested in learning ways to help locating Patellas NATURALLY, let me know.

"Luxating" is a fancy word for dislocating. Patella is your dog's "knee", the joint on the front of her/his hind leg. So a luxating patella is a dislocating knee or as some have nick named it; trick knee, a knee that keeps slipping out of its socket. This can happen in Boston Terriers and certain toy breeds with weak ligaments, tendons, and/or muscles. It can also happen other breeds in pups whose kneecap groove is too narrow or shallow. The knee usually slips inwardly, toward the body, and locks so that your dog can't bend her/his leg.

Does My Dog Have a Luxating Patella?
You might suspect a luxating patella if your dog sometimes lifts one hind leg while running, or if she/he often moves both rear legs at the same time, like a hopping bunny. Sometimes the knee slips only for a few moments and then slides back into place. Sometimes the knee slips out and stays out, and your Boston will hold her/his leg off the ground and limp, perhaps tucking the thigh into her/his body.

Luxation may occur in one knee, or in both. It is seen in many small breeds, and in both sexes. Even if the knees seem to be firm as puppies, it is not a bad idea to have have your dog's patellas checked every two years by your veterinarian.

Is luxation serious?
There are four degrees (grades) of luxation:
Grade I. The knee only slips out when the vet manipulates it.

Grade II. The knee luxates occasionally when the dog is walking or running. He/she may not seem to mind much, or they may shriek, but it usually slides back by itself as they continues moving. Or you can slip it back manually (ask the vet to show you how).

Grade III. The knee luxates frequently and causes chronic lameness. Even when you put it back manually, it doesn't seem to last long.

Grade IV. The knee luxates, stays that way, and you can't put it back into its socket. This grade is very rare but happens.

How is luxation treated?

* The first treatment should be to crate or keep the dog in a small area for a week or two and supervise all activity - no jumping or running.

* Most veterinarians will prescribe a Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (like Rimadyl or another NSAID). However, these will only hide the symptoms and may reduce some of the inflammation, but do absolutely nothing to strengthen or correct the condition.

* Some veterinarians will prescribe Steroidal anti-inflammatory medications. These have proven to be extremely damaging to the immune system, have awful side effects (short and long term), and in my opinion, should never be used.

*Surgery is seldom the answer and if needed, should only be done by an orthopedic surgeon if the dog is in chronic pain.

If you decide on surgery, please call the American College of Veterinary Surgeons at (301) 718-6504 and ask for a referral to an orthopedic specialist or college of veterinary medicine in your state.

If surgery is your choice, be aware that the dog may very likely have problems down the road with arthritis from the surgery. In the opinion of most veterinarians, surgery is overkill for Grade I or II luxating patella. I personally would only go with surgery on a Grade IV luxation, or on a Grade III that did not respond to natural treatment and the dog was in constant pain. Surgery costs around a thousand dollars per patella, it is uncomfortable for your dog, and there is a 50% chance that some degree of luxation will return at some point in time.
Dr. Jeannie Thomason, animal naturopath The Whole Dog.
Interesting, thank you for sending this information. She is not in pain at all. Still young and starting PT soon. Home exercises also.
 

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I have posted a couple of times about my miniature poodle who had a grade 4 luxating patella. She had surgery this past summer at a year and a half. Hers was quite obvious and she could not use it at all after turning a year old. I was able to get her referred to a board certified orthopedic veterinarian. She was able to use the leg after surgery and physical therapy.
 

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I would look into what "appropriate exercise" is for a Poodle of her age and size. Many breeders don't educate their puppy buyers on the importance of age appropriate exercise for puppies and how dangerous too much or the wrong kind of exercise can be to a puppy under 12 - 24 months of age. Have you contacted your breeder and told her/him about the puppy having locating patella? They really should be made aware of this. :-(
 

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[QUOTE="GenteelPoodles, post: 3324331, member: 123459", s
I would look into what "appropriate exercise" is for a Poodle of her age and size. Many breeders don't educate their puppy buyers on the importance of age appropriate exercise for puppies and how dangerous too much or the wrong kind of exercise can be to a puppy under 12 - 24 months of age. Have you contacted your breeder and told her/him about the puppy having locating patella? They really should be made aware of this. :-(
[/QUOTE]
Tank you for responding Yes I have talked to her I have another consult next week and I will reach out to her again when I hear what this vet says. I was very careful on walks and distance for age, started very slow and not every day.
 

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[QUOTE="GenteelPoodles, post: 3324331, member: 123459", s
I would look into what "appropriate exercise" is for a Poodle of her age and size. Many breeders don't educate their puppy buyers on the importance of age appropriate exercise for puppies and how dangerous too much or the wrong kind of exercise can be to a puppy under 12 - 24 months of age. Have you contacted your breeder and told her/him about the puppy having locating patella? They really should be made aware of this. :-(
Tank you for responding Yes I have talked to her I have another consult next week and I will reach out to her again when I hear what this vet says. I was very careful on walks and distance for age, started very slow and not every day.
[/QUOTE]

OK then good for you on being careful with her exercise -not using stairs, playing on slick floors or surfaces, etc. This is worrisome though as having locating patellas this bad is not normal for a puppy of her age. There is hope she will grow out of it though. Have you talked to an animal nutritionist? Proper nutrition is always the foundation of good health - especially structural soundness. :)
 

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Tank you for responding Yes I have talked to her I have another consult next week and I will reach out to her again when I hear what this vet says. I was very careful on walks and distance for age, started very slow and not every day.
OK then good for you on being careful with her exercise -not using stairs, playing on slick floors or surfaces, etc. This is worrisome though as having locating patellas this bad is not normal for a puppy of her age. There is hope she will grow out of it though. Have you talked to an animal nutritionist? Proper nutrition is always the foundation of good health - especially structural soundness. :)
[/QUOTE]
Tank you for responding Yes I have talked to her I have another consult next week and I will reach out to her again when I hear what this vet says. I was very careful on walks and distance for age, started very slow and not every day.
OK then good for you on being careful with her exercise -not using stairs, playing on slick floors or surfaces, etc. This is worrisome though as having locating patellas this bad is not normal for a puppy of her age. There is hope she will grow out of it though. Have you talked to an animal nutritionist? Proper nutrition is always the foundation of good health - especially structural soundness. :)
[/QUOTE]
She is fed Answers Raw. She was weaned to raw. Also fish stock which is high on glucousamine, chondrointin, and HA also every other day Cosequin and I will switch to Dasuquin. She is a very active puppy and at times hard to keep her quiet. Only stairs is to the basement which she is not aloud. Rugs all over cuz of wood floors. steps to couch which she uses most of the time. Hard to restrict her at times. PT consult will be with a sports rehabilitation Vet so hoping for some positive input.
 
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