Poodle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,697 Posts
I can’t say how having a dog changed my life, because I’ve never been without a dog my entire life, except briefly.

Dogs are very special to me. On some aspects, I connect more easily and profoundly with dogs than humans. I have two dogs right now and one of them is helping me go through a very tough time in my life. She makes me laugh and helps take the depression away. She makes life worthwhile when I don’t feel like being here anymore.

I always tell people, the day I don’t have a dog in my life is the day you will come and visit me at the cemetary. My greatest fear is to have to go into a nursing home one day and have to live without dogs. I don’t think I could bear it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,145 Posts
I’ve made a ton of new friends and acquaintances because of my dog.

I actively participate in several dog sports; something I never would have guessed I would do before I got my dog. In fact I didn’t even know these things existed. I took a basic obedience class and fell in love with the close relationship one develops with their dog through training. I would never have predicted this. I highly recommend you take training through to the AKC Canine Good Citizen. I learned a lot about how to handle my dog in public to keep her safe and well behaved. Dog sports has me traveling far and wide for training and competition and I’ve made many wonderful new friends.

I’m now well known in my community because of my dog. I was in the post office and was shocked that they knew my dogs name.... apparently my mailman has talked about my dog to the other mailmen. My minipoo has a beautiful gait when she walks, is very friendly and well behaved, is always well groomed and she draws people to her no matter where we go. People remember her.

She has enriched DH and my life. I can’t imagine not having her.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,399 Posts
No children, married first time at 40, always had a dog in the family then the first poodle in 1963, and nothing but poodles since.

Like Dechi, I dread the day I may no longer be able to have a dog.

From the movie Six Days Seven Nights:

Quinn Harris: "I decided my life is too simple, I wanna complicate the hell out of it."

My poodles have complicated my life in the best possible way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,336 Posts
We had family dogs when I was a child, but I worked long hours with a lot of travelling so waited until I accidentally retired early to bring my first pup home. The dogs bring so much to my life - companionship, routine, exercise and a connection to the natural world. The biggest change has probably been walking - I used to be a reluctant walker, venturing out on A Walk only a few times a year. Now I am out for several hours a day, and every place I visit is chosen as much for its good dog walking as for its human attractions! I travel as little as possible, although that is almost as much because I did so much in my job that it is bliss to be able to avoid trains and planes and endless motorway drives as because I am reluctant to leave the dogs. Dogs - much loved, family member dogs - change your life in ways similar to having a small child in the house, with many of the same accommodations.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,025 Posts
I have had many dogs since childhood. Pinky, my ESS (RIP) touched my heart and she was great as a working dog and a companion. But no dog beats my Asta. We are truly and well bonded. He seems to sense my mood (I have bipolar disorder) and he just know what to do - a snuggle, out for a walk to get me out of the house for awhile - play time to get me laughing at his antics. I am constantly amazed with the help this dog brings to me. So I guess I would say he is my emotional service dog (not fond of that label, but this is what he does for me) I would be lost without him and probably would sink in the morass that is my disease. Love this boy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,502 Posts
Had dogs most of my life, but at 73 divorced since 1982 my dogs are my my life, I have 3 and consider them kids, not dogs. They keep me active and working (could not afford them if I did not work). The get me business, and friends (not so much male friends over the years, as most men, I have meet are not into dogs as I am. I get my dogs all dressed up and I get dressed up and away we go. I spend way to much on the dogs, but they deserve it for all the love and companionship, my 3 toys girls have. No regrets. Could not live without a dog around if able to take care of them
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,616 Posts
Buck has tipped the scales. I was at a wellness doctor’s appointment recently and I haven’t weighed so little since college. Like fjm, having a poodle has really dialed up my exercise. A personal trainer was not needed, a club membership was not needed, no restrictive diet either. Just a poodle. Since DH and I are empty nesters, it’s nice to have the company too. I also feel safer with an imposing watchdog that doesn’t raise any flags/premiums with my homeowners insurance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
Owning dogs really helps me keep my spirits up when I'm home alone.

My wife is a nurse, and works ever-changing hours. Right now, she works full time afternoons, while I work full time days. So, other than her off days, I only see her for about 35 minutes at lunch time. That means that for my evenings, it's just me and the dogs. That would be pretty hard on me if I only had an empty house at night. But, the dogs add so much love and positive energy.

Other than that, I can't say having dogs has changed my life too dramatically. In many ways, our dogs just tag along on our life journey.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,526 Posts
I also feel safer with an imposing watchdog that doesn’t raise any flags/premiums with my homeowners insurance.[/QUOTE]

Now isn't that the truth! They have a imposing bark which is sometimes all you need. I use to have Rottweilers, and the insurance company red flags you. They haven't said anything about our boxer, who I also love dearly. He touches my heart every day but officially he belongs to my daughter who will maybe one day more out on her own.LOL So I have my poodle! Whom I also love dearly but it will be nice when he behaves as well as the boxer. LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
I echo the comments above...dogs, and in particular poodles, have enriched my life in many ways and deepened my understanding of devotion. As long as I am able, I will have a poodle.

Always present, vigilant, steady, joyful, responsive, and nonjudgmental, my dogs have been companions for the ages. As I have aged, they have helped keep me moving physically, and reinforeced my desire to stay as atheltic for as long as possible...and at the least walking well enough to get out each day. Their steadyness is truely remarkable, especially in comparison to humans who suffer greater swings in moods and temprement. No matter what, my dog Ivan is there with me, and when he leaves me, I'll have another poodle because they have taught me its possible to love many in a lifetime, and each one gives life additional meaning and rewards.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
We had family dogs when I was a child, but I worked long hours with a lot of travelling so waited until I accidentally retired early to bring my first pup home. The dogs bring so much to my life - companionship, routine, exercise and a connection to the natural world. The biggest change has probably been walking - I used to be a reluctant walker, venturing out on A Walk only a few times a year. Now I am out for several hours a day, and every place I visit is chosen as much for its good dog walking as for its human attractions! I travel as little as possible, although that is almost as much because I did so much in my job that it is bliss to be able to avoid trains and planes and endless motorway drives as because I am reluctant to leave the dogs. Dogs - much loved, family member dogs - change your life in ways similar to having a small child in the house, with many of the same accommodations.
I am looking forward to all of the changes even though there will be an adjustment period.
I'm beyond excited and I know that we will discover that our hearts can hold even more love. :love2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I have had many dogs since childhood. Pinky, my ESS (RIP) touched my heart and she was great as a working dog and a companion. But no dog beats my Asta. We are truly and well bonded. He seems to sense my mood (I have bipolar disorder) and he just know what to do - a snuggle, out for a walk to get me out of the house for awhile - play time to get me laughing at his antics. I am constantly amazed with the help this dog brings to me. So I guess I would say he is my emotional service dog (not fond of that label, but this is what he does for me) I would be lost without him and probably would sink in the morass that is my disease. Love this boy.
What a wonderful and inspiring post!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,810 Posts
There have been dogs in my life ever since I can remember......I lived in a family of animal lovers and my Dad also had bird dogs, so dogs were just another part of family life that was continued even when I became a mother and now my son has his own Family with dogs included!
BUT.........my current dog is my best dog because she is my last dog. She is my empty nest child, my Bff, my keeper of secrets, my foot warmer, my outdoor nature companion, my insurance against loneliness, my reason to get out of bed, my smiles, my laughter, my last chapter.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
22,964 Posts
I keep starting through this thread and getting side tracked. Although there were dogs all along in my family when I was growing up, like fjm I had a hectic and irregular work schedule for the early part of my career and I lived in a lovely spacious duplex apartment that was on the 2nd/3rd floor and had no yard. A dog would not have fit my life in those days, so had three lovely cats (and I still miss having them). Once we moved into our current home together BF and I both wanted dogs, his previous GSD had died over a year before the move and I had been dreaming of a black standard poodle girl for decades. Within about 6 months of our move we each had our pups, Lily and Peeves. Lily was a wild child of a puppy and it was a lot of work to build our relationship and that work was well worth it. To get her to be the best she could be I had to let go of a lot of stress that I carried around related to work and such. My more steady inner peace grew from learning how Lily thinks and responds and that experience made me a much better puppy raiser for Javelin.

Having three big dogs makes travel complicated. We don't leave the three of them together at home when we go to the Indy 500. It is just too much to ask of one person to handle all the little oddities of the dogs, plus to take care of the chickens. Javelin has stayed with my mom the last two years, but since he pulled her off her feet a couple of times this year we can't do that again. Hypothetically he could come with us as my SD, but I am not sure I would want him with me all of that time and for the noisiness of racing. I am hoping a friend of mine from work who he adores and who gives it right back at him will be willing to care for him when we are away next May. I wouldn't trade the complexities for anything in the world though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
I've been battling a bout of depression since July. It's situational depression stemming from family issues. There is grief and betrayal involved.

My husband has been a great help but I am hoping that the joy of welcoming a long awaited dog will be beneficial. I also think that the new responsibilities of dog mommyhood will give me something more positive to focus on. I realize that I need to be as calm and upbeat as possible because poodles, especially puppies, are very sensitive to emotional tension.
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top