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Not sure if this is true for you too.... But I find if I take Annie to a dog park every day and she runs like mad... Her excitability goes through the roof. It seems that when you exercise a dog's body and excitement a lot, they get better at running and being excited. When you exercise their mind and self control, they get better at self control. She still needs to have some mindless running, but I am careful to make sure that's not the only thing we do.

So we go weekly, as she needs to run off leash. Maybe 3 x a week, but usually at times when there is only one or two other dogs there, or no one there. I also like to take her for offleash or long line hikes to drain energy. I take her out when she shows any signs of flagging - exhausted dogs are dogs more likely to get careless and injured.

Overarrousal with squirrels - I dealt with this in many ways, some more successful than others, but the biggest thing I learned was to restrict daytime walks to 5 min or less while we were dealing with it. Every time she saw a trigger (squirrel) she got more and more amped up. If I kept walks shorter, she could deal with a couple squirrels without becoming a psycho barking brainless poodle.

Sniffing - smelling walks, and our hikes usually, is also a really good form of stress relief for a dog.

A border collie trainer I went to ( she trains and competes with high drive dogs in herding, flyball, agility, etc and cheerfully admits most people wouldn't want to live with her dogs) suggested to me that to teach Annie calm, I start by teaching her an AWESOME down stay. Every time I worked in the kitchen, she was put in a stay, and I yoss treats at her. An active alert stay is fine. A treat every 10s for a while, then every 15s, .... 1 min, 2 min ... Randomly through the session ( I used to watch the clock). A long down stay is incredibly mentally draining. I also threw a treat at her every time she relaxed into it. Head down? Treat. Her leg cocked out? Treat. Roll onto a hip? Treat. Flop over? Treat. It helped, and bonus points, Annie now stays out of my way in her spot in the kitchen. She also suggested Annie work for her dinner to drain off energy in a productive manner. So a Kong wobbler, scatter her food on the floor, puzzle toys, Kongs, and working directly with me for her dinner.
 

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Brava For Want of Poodle!!! You hit the nail on the head in your first paragraph.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
It may well be that he likes the idea of playing with other dogs but that kind of response to seeing other dogs is not normal and still is provoking all kinds of bad neurological and hormonal responses that he is "learning" everytime he makes those responses. Learning promotes behaviors, bad as well as good. Once he sees a dog that he wants to access and go crazy then he is experiencing frustration and that is not a good emotional state. I think many people see frustration and its results (jumping, biting to get you to let go of the leash and pulling on leash) are behaviors that can be counter conditioned.

I doubt a TV program with dogs will help. He needs to see real dogs at distances that keep him under threshold with the key part of the work being staying under threshold. Are there many people who walk on leash dogs in your neighborhood? If yes, you sit in a chair outside your front door and watch them go by. Work on keeping your dog's attention and collected head and reward that. If you see that he is going to go over the top take him inside before he starts to go crazy. This is essentially what I did with the dog I described in my earlier post. She wasn't fearful at all, but had terrible social skills around other animals because she was developmentally deprived in her first year of life because she spent most of her time penned up in a run all by herself. A trainer who knows their stuff should be able to help with that counter conditioning based training.

No dog in the world should be allowed to run aimlessly for two hours. It just isn't necessary and it reinforces being out of control. I suspect if you spent ten minutes at a time 3-4 times per day doing impulse control activities with your dog you would be thrilled with the outcome. He will gain patience and will become more bonded to you than you can possibly believe is possible. I still do that kind of activity with my poodles and the result is two very high drive dogs that love to work with me but also have enough stimulus control to recognize that while I am lecturing to a human class or while I am teaching a novice obedience class to be able to lie down and go to sleep. As I type they are both sleeping within about ten feet from my desk.
Any advice on how to reward in that kind of situation when the dog doesn’t care about food / treats? He had very little interest, so any kind of food - even like meatballs or cheese - will never entice him if there’s a dog nearby. Toys excite him so I feel like that would be counter productive?
 

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@ Faust

If he's too excited for food - he's way overthreshold. Too overthreshold to learn. Practice something (I like the sit and back up, sit, and back up) and proof it in a lower excitement environments, and then slowly work up to the higher threshold stuff. Turning and walking away, and being content with a walk never actually going anywhere helps - I have been known to just walk back and forth 1 house down my street.

Also - get REALLY good food. I once did a walk with Annie with bits of raw beef, which was very successful. Cheese, cooked meat, etc are good too. I've also had some success recently with making food more interesing by kind of using it like it;s prey, making Annie chase it a bit. Maybe not a good idea with an overwound up spoo who wants to nip, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Not sure if this is true for you too.... But I find if I take Annie to a dog park every day and she runs like mad... Her excitability goes through the roof. It seems that when you exercise a dog's body and excitement a lot, they get better at running and being excited. When you exercise their mind and self control, they get better at self control. She still needs to have some mindless running, but I am careful to make sure that's not the only thing we do.

So we go weekly, as she needs to run off leash. Maybe 3 x a week, but usually at times when there is only one or two other dogs there, or no one there. I also like to take her for offleash or long line hikes to drain energy. I take her out when she shows any signs of flagging - exhausted dogs are dogs more likely to get careless and injured.

Overarrousal with squirrels - I dealt with this in many ways, some more successful than others, but the biggest thing I learned was to restrict daytime walks to 5 min or less while we were dealing with it. Every time she saw a trigger (squirrel) she got more and more amped up. If I kept walks shorter, she could deal with a couple squirrels without becoming a psycho barking brainless poodle.

Sniffing - smelling walks, and our hikes usually, is also a really good form of stress relief for a dog.

A border collie trainer I went to ( she trains and competes with high drive dogs in herding, flyball, agility, etc and cheerfully admits most people wouldn't want to live with her dogs) suggested to me that to teach Annie calm, I start by teaching her an AWESOME down stay. Every time I worked in the kitchen, she was put in a stay, and I yoss treats at her. An active alert stay is fine. A treat every 10s for a while, then every 15s, .... 1 min, 2 min ... Randomly through the session ( I used to watch the clock). A long down stay is incredibly mentally draining. I also threw a treat at her every time she relaxed into it. Head down? Treat. Her leg cocked out? Treat. Roll onto a hip? Treat. Flop over? Treat. It helped, and bonus points, Annie now stays out of my way in her spot in the kitchen. She also suggested Annie work for her dinner to drain off energy in a productive manner. So a Kong wobbler, scatter her food on the floor, puzzle toys, Kongs, and working directly with me for her dinner.
Not sure if this is true for you too.... But I find if I take Annie to a dog park every day and she runs like mad... Her excitability goes through the roof. It seems that when you exercise a dog's body and excitement a lot, they get better at running and being excited. When you exercise their mind and self control, they get better at self control. She still needs to have some mindless running, but I am careful to make sure that's not the only thing we do.

So we go weekly, as she needs to run off leash. Maybe 3 x a week, but usually at times when there is only one or two other dogs there, or no one there. I also like to take her for offleash or long line hikes to drain energy. I take her out when she shows any signs of flagging - exhausted dogs are dogs more likely to get careless and injured.

Overarrousal with squirrels - I dealt with this in many ways, some more successful than others, but the biggest thing I learned was to restrict daytime walks to 5 min or less while we were dealing with it. Every time she saw a trigger (squirrel) she got more and more amped up. If I kept walks shorter, she could deal with a couple squirrels without becoming a psycho barking brainless poodle.

Sniffing - smelling walks, and our hikes usually, is also a really good form of stress relief for a dog.

A border collie trainer I went to ( she trains and competes with high drive dogs in herding, flyball, agility, etc and cheerfully admits most people wouldn't want to live with her dogs) suggested to me that to teach Annie calm, I start by teaching her an AWESOME down stay. Every time I worked in the kitchen, she was put in a stay, and I yoss treats at her. An active alert stay is fine. A treat every 10s for a while, then every 15s, .... 1 min, 2 min ... Randomly through the session ( I used to watch the clock). A long down stay is incredibly mentally draining. I also threw a treat at her every time she relaxed into it. Head down? Treat. Her leg cocked out? Treat. Roll onto a hip? Treat. Flop over? Treat. It helped, and bonus points, Annie now stays out of my way in her spot in the kitchen. She also suggested Annie work for her dinner to drain off energy in a productive manner. So a Kong wobbler, scatter her food on the floor, puzzle toys, Kongs, and working directly with me for her dinner.
that sounds awesome! I only wish Mephi were at all interested in treat or food. I’ve filled kongs with every nice treat imaginable and he couldn’t care less!

the breeder also said don’t over exercise him bc it will make him used to more exercise... but it feels like I’m stuck - he doesn’t get tired from training - he just gets bored after a while bc he’s no longer interested in the rewards (he wants maybe like one or two treats then walks away or just leaves them on the ground). he acts even more wild if I don’t let him go run around outside hah!
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
@ Faust

If he's too excited for food - he's way overthreshold. Too overthreshold to learn. Practice something (I like the sit and back up, sit, and back up) and proof it in a lower excitement environments, and then slowly work up to the higher threshold stuff. Turning and walking away, and being content with a walk never actually going anywhere helps - I have been known to just walk back and forth 1 house down my street.

Also - get REALLY good food. I once did a walk with Annie with bits of raw beef, which was very successful. Cheese, cooked meat, etc are good too. I've also had some success recently with making food more interesing by kind of using it like it;s prey, making Annie chase it a bit. Maybe not a good idea with an overwound up spoo who wants to nip, though.
funny enough I can leave raw meat out for him in his bowl and he doesn’t touch it for hours.., then might come eat it later. Sometimes he just leaves it completely 🤦‍♀️
 

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I'm responding to this again, just because I think I went through a lot of the same issues you are having when Annie was 7 mo-12 mo ish.

A lot of poodles don't seem to be able to handle more than a couple repetitions at a time. That's normal! Always stop when they still want more, even if it's only one repetition, and slowly they will want to work more, because they never feel like it got tiring/boring/not fun. 1 repetition 10 times in a day is more effective than 10 repetitions all at once anyway. If he wasn't finished, next time he will be more excited to work.

What DOES he enjoy? You can work on self control using anything he enjoys as the reward, it's just a bit more difficult for the human . For example, Annie LOVES walks. So to get her leash on, she has to sit and stay. To get me to open the door, sit and stay. To cross the street? Sit at heel position, eyes on me. Out of the car? Wait for permission. Enter the dog park? Sit and stay and wait for permission, then I open the door. Playing ball? Sit and stay and then the ball gets thrown. Tug? Sit and wait or down and wait, and then we play, then a pause, sit and wait and play. We build it up, increasing time and complexity of what I ask so she knows that doing what I want and showing self control = getting what she wants.

For food- a lot of dogs are more motivated to eat if they have to work for it. Our Yorkie is a pain to eat kibble, but put it in a puzzle toy (we started with treats, now just use kibble) and she gobbles it down and works really hard to get it. When Annie refused to eat for a while, tossing her food on the floor to hunt and find meant she would actually eat. Things that are free have little value. I will comment that the stages where she was uninterested in food was also the stage when I took her to doggy daycare every day or took her to the park everyday. It was too much stress for her, so she stopped eating, even though she loved going. She also stops eating on camping trips. She loves them, but they are also very overstimulating. She needs to be calm to want to eat.

As for settling... Do you crate him at all? Does he have any napping time? I had to enforce crate rest for a while when she was a puppy. Also, if he is used to a highly active lifestyle, it will take time and perseverance to get him used to a less active one, and to de-stress from it. Maybe a week or two of him being more annoying than usual. (I went through this when I stopped bringing Annie to the dog park every day).
 

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Back at 7 months of age, we were spending like 4 hours a day in the dog park and he didn't show any signs of tiredness. I was kicking a football for hours with him and he was still running at top speed - insane.
Exercise is important, but it's a delicate balance. There's a point at which adrenaline takes over. The article I linked here might be helpful to you.

If we play a serious game of fetch with Peggy (i.e. more than a dozen fun tosses mixed in with other play) she is amped up for the rest of the day. It takes a while for the stress hormones to leave the body and extended games of fetch are extremely stressful.

If your boy has been exercised like that since he was a young puppy, you may need to hit a big reset button. You may have inadvertently created quite an adrenaline junkie/marathon athlete. :)

Here's some more info: Too Much of a Good Thing: Overexcitement in Exercise
 

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Give rewards your dog will appreciate as rewards. It could be as simple as a little personal play like an ear scratch or belly rub.
 
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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
I'm responding to this again, just because I think I went through a lot of the same issues you are having when Annie was 7 mo-12 mo ish.

A lot of poodles don't seem to be able to handle more than a couple repetitions at a time. That's normal! Always stop when they still want more, even if it's only one repetition, and slowly they will want to work more, because they never feel like it got tiring/boring/not fun. 1 repetition 10 times in a day is more effective than 10 repetitions all at once anyway. If he wasn't finished, next time he will be more excited to work.

What DOES he enjoy? You can work on self control using anything he enjoys as the reward, it's just a bit more difficult for the human . For example, Annie LOVES walks. So to get her leash on, she has to sit and stay. To get me to open the door, sit and stay. To cross the street? Sit at heel position, eyes on me. Out of the car? Wait for permission. Enter the dog park? Sit and stay and wait for permission, then I open the door. Playing ball? Sit and stay and then the ball gets thrown. Tug? Sit and wait or down and wait, and then we play, then a pause, sit and wait and play. We build it up, increasing time and complexity of what I ask so she knows that doing what I want and showing self control = getting what she wants.

For food- a lot of dogs are more motivated to eat if they have to work for it. Our Yorkie is a pain to eat kibble, but put it in a puzzle toy (we started with treats, now just use kibble) and she gobbles it down and works really hard to get it. When Annie refused to eat for a while, tossing her food on the floor to hunt and find meant she would actually eat. Things that are free have little value. I will comment that the stages where she was uninterested in food was also the stage when I took her to doggy daycare every day or took her to the park everyday. It was too much stress for her, so she stopped eating, even though she loved going. She also stops eating on camping trips. She loves them, but they are also very overstimulating. She needs to be calm to want to eat.

As for settling... Do you crate him at all? Does he have any napping time? I had to enforce crate rest for a while when she was a puppy. Also, if he is used to a highly active lifestyle, it will take time and perseverance to get him used to a less active one, and to de-stress from it. Maybe a week or two of him being more annoying than usual. (I went through this when I stopped bringing Annie to the dog park every day).
Thanks so much for the advice! I really appreciate you taking the time!

I guess I just have to keep working to try to make him wait for things.

He definitely naps. When he was 6-7 months he never sat down but now he will nap a good portion of the day. So we have a small room (it’s a loggia / about 4-5 square meters approx) that is his crate - it has a gate. I got a crate when he was a puppy but I think he doesnt like not having the space above his head. So we treat the little room like his crate basically. He spends a decent amount of time in there. Probably about 3 hours during work hours and maybe an hour or hour and a half at night. We used to have him in there more but found he acts up less outside he can hang out with us more outside his room during the day. If he starts barking or getting into things he shouldn’t he gets time out there.

Interesting about the over stimulation thing and eating. He doesn’t seem very over stimulated except for getting excited outside on walks. We actually had a relapse of bad behavior when we had to restrict his exercise due to kennel cough two weeks ago. He definitely is better behaved if he gets a bit of dog park time. His usual schedule these days is 4 times outside per day, 2 just to pee and inside, 2 walks of between 15 and 45 minutes depending on the day. He goes to daycare once a week. And I try to take him to the big dog park with lots of other dogs once a week. Usually I take him to the empty dog park once a week too. This is way down from summer when we were spending hours and hours out - but with it getting dark here now at 3:30pm it’s hard to have daylight hours to go to the park (it’s not lit at night) and still hold down a paying job! ;)

Mephi doesn’t love to hunt for food either. We have puzzle games but he’s not super motivated usually. Same with a Kong. He does like gnawing on bones. He definitely isn’t excited for walks - when he sees me take out the leash he grabs the nearest bone or toy and goes to sit on the couch and refuses to move. Haha

what he loves? Other dogs haha
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
Exercise is important, but it's a delicate balance. There's a point at which adrenaline takes over. The article I linked here might be helpful to you.

If we play a serious game of fetch with Peggy (i.e. more than a dozen fun tosses mixed in with other play) she is amped up for the rest of the day. It takes a while for the stress hormones to leave the body and extended games of fetch are extremely stressful.

If your boy has been exercised like that since he was a young puppy, you may need to hit a big reset button. You may have inadvertently created quite an adrenaline junkie/marathon athlete. :)

Here's some more info: Too Much of a Good Thing: Overexcitement in Exercise
haha thanks! It was initially a reaction to his crazy energy level - thought we were giving him what he needed - but I hear what you’re saying! It felt like the only way we could keep him from bouncing off the walls. I hope we didn’t ruin him now 😰 the jumping/biting came back with a vengeance when we had to ease up on our usual outside time
 

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Hello all!

I've been lurking on this forum for a while but haven't posted. I have a teenage standard poodle - 10 months old now. Since about 7 months, he's been doing this thing on walks where he "attacks" us. It's fairly clear it's rough play and not really angry/aggressive. But something will set him off - seeing another dog, a person running, a bike, etc. - and then he will get over-excited and turn on us and start growling, jumping, and biting. It usually takes a good 15-20 minutes to calm him down, meanwhile all the people walking by are staring at me while I'm mauled by my dog. Since he's now 26 kg (57 lbs) and uses the full force of his jaw, it really hurts. I'm covered in bruises. Ignoring him isn't an option because of course he's actually doing damage.

T
I had to chime in here. Marchie sounds like your pup's double in many ways. As a youngster, he had zero frustration tolerance and would pitch a fit if we wouldn't let him meet another dog while on a walk. Standing up on his hind legs, pawing the air, to get the other dog's attention; nipping and biting us when he didn't get his way. Not motivated in the least, by food or toys, and unable to handle a group dog class once he hit 6 months because he HAD to socialize and didn't want to be controlled when other dogs were around.

Well, the good news is, they get better as they mature. One year old was better, two years was even better, and now, at four years old, he rarely does the "attack Mom (or Dad) when he doesn't get his way" thing.

Things that helped for us: Draining off energy by letting him play with another dog in a fenced yard or at the dog park (It turns out, he's got good social skills with dogs and with people.) In our yard, we used a homemade flirt pole to exercise him. (Make sure he's got a good GIVE command so you can retrieve the "prize" from him.) Using their brains is equally tiring to dogs. Once we had a firm SIT and WAIT, we'd show him a toy, leave him on a sit, and hide it in the house, then return and ask him to FIND it. That was very good for taking the edge off him.

Lastly, when out on a walk, when he pulls that act, I can always see it coming now, and I stop, put the leash under my shoe so he can't jump, and turn my back on him until he cools down. Sometimes I get a nip in the butt, but he doesn't get any joy from my non-reaction, so he settles down.

Having a high drive dog is hard. If you can find some channel for his energy, until he gets more mature, and learns more commands firmly, it will help. Perhaps when he's a year old, you can get him a backpack and have him carry a load too. He will mellow out and your walks will improve. Until then, I recommend a sturdy dog walking outfit (I always wore heavy jeans and something on my arms, like a jacket) to protect you. There's hope: every dog owner in our neighborhood (and virtually every dog) loves Marchie and thinks he's perfect. Little do they know what we went through when he was young. ;)
 

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Hello all!

I've been lurking on this forum for a while but haven't posted. I have a teenage standard poodle - 10 months old now. Since about 7 months, he's been doing this thing on walks where he "attacks" us. It's fairly clear it's rough play and not really angry/aggressive. But something will set him off - seeing another dog, a person running, a bike, etc. - and then he will get over-excited and turn on us and start growling, jumping, and biting. It usually takes a good 15-20 minutes to calm him down, meanwhile all the people walking by are staring at me while I'm mauled by my dog. Since he's now 26 kg (57 lbs) and uses the full force of his jaw, it really hurts. I'm covered in bruises. Ignoring him isn't an option because of course he's actually doing damage.

This is my first dog ever... has anyone ever experienced this? Will it go away with age? Is there some training method I can use with him to get him to stop? In general, he has no chill when he sees other dogs or something exciting. I'm so jealous of other people with 10 month old dogs who can just calmly pass by a bike or a child without going crazy.

Any advice appreciated - we're at our wits end with him!

EDIT: should have mentioned here are things we have tried -- we took him to two obedience courses where he was hyped up and couldn't focus the whole time bc other dogs were there. We did one on one with a trainer who gave mental stimulation exercises (some of which, like dog parkour actual set him off sometimes). We also took him to puppy preschool where they tried to work at desensitizing him to other dogs (they said he's exceptionally difficult compared to other dogs), but he now goes to regular dog daycare once a week and is kept in a separate room and walked separately bc he has no chill. And I'm now trying the pigs fly training method because he's not very motivated by treats or toys.
Hi Faust,
I have my first poodle, she is almost 2 years old. She went through a period when it was like a switch turned on and she would growl, bite, jump and bark at me with such energy that it seemed that she couldn’t even hear me. I’d walk away, but she’d follow and continue this behavior. I read a couple of books by the Monks of New Skete, a group that has bred and raised German shepherds for a couple of decades. They had some really good training instructions and ways to control wild behavior. Luckily for me when these wild tantrums occurred we were usually in our fenced backyard. So I could eventually grab her and apply the control techniques. After a while the episodes became less frequent and now she is turning into an amazing dog. She still has an occasional rare wild hair, but as long as I can hold her and give her some firm hugging and body rubs, she will calm down. I kept trying to figure out if there was some pattern to the wild behavior, and for a while I thought it might be happening when she was hungry, maybe a hangry reaction. I think as she has gotten older, everything is more moderated. If you can get your hands on a copy of their book (one is “How to be your dog’s best friend”, another is a puppy training book), I highly recommend them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
I had to chime in here. Marchie sounds like your pup's double in many ways. As a youngster, he had zero frustration tolerance and would pitch a fit if we wouldn't let him meet another dog while on a walk. Standing up on his hind legs, pawing the air, to get the other dog's attention; nipping and biting us when he didn't get his way. Not motivated in the least, by food or toys, and unable to handle a group dog class once he hit 6 months because he HAD to socialize and didn't want to be controlled when other dogs were around.

Well, the good news is, they get better as they mature. One year old was better, two years was even better, and now, at four years old, he rarely does the "attack Mom (or Dad) when he doesn't get his way" thing.

Things that helped for us: Draining off energy by letting him play with another dog in a fenced yard or at the dog park (It turns out, he's got good social skills with dogs and with people.) In our yard, we used a homemade flirt pole to exercise him. (Make sure he's got a good GIVE command so you can retrieve the "prize" from him.) Using their brains is equally tiring to dogs. Once we had a firm SIT and WAIT, we'd show him a toy, leave him on a sit, and hide it in the house, then return and ask him to FIND it. That was very good for taking the edge off him.

Lastly, when out on a walk, when he pulls that act, I can always see it coming now, and I stop, put the leash under my shoe so he can't jump, and turn my back on him until he cools down. Sometimes I get a nip in the butt, but he doesn't get any joy from my non-reaction, so he settles down.

Having a high drive dog is hard. If you can find some channel for his energy, until he gets more mature, and learns more commands firmly, it will help. Perhaps when he's a year old, you can get him a backpack and have him carry a load too. He will mellow out and your walks will improve. Until then, I recommend a sturdy dog walking outfit (I always wore heavy jeans and something on my arms, like a jacket) to protect you. There's hope: every dog owner in our neighborhood (and virtually every dog) loves Marchie and thinks he's perfect. Little do they know what we went through when he was young. ;)
Thanks! That's reassuring! Your dog sounds pretty much exactly like Mephi. :) Fingers crossed that he settles down in the next 8-12 months! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
Hi Faust,
I have my first poodle, she is almost 2 years old. She went through a period when it was like a switch turned on and she would growl, bite, jump and bark at me with such energy that it seemed that she couldn’t even hear me. I’d walk away, but she’d follow and continue this behavior. I read a couple of books by the Monks of New Skete, a group that has bred and raised German shepherds for a couple of decades. They had some really good training instructions and ways to control wild behavior. Luckily for me when these wild tantrums occurred we were usually in our fenced backyard. So I could eventually grab her and apply the control techniques. After a while the episodes became less frequent and now she is turning into an amazing dog. She still has an occasional rare wild hair, but as long as I can hold her and give her some firm hugging and body rubs, she will calm down. I kept trying to figure out if there was some pattern to the wild behavior, and for a while I thought it might be happening when she was hungry, maybe a hangry reaction. I think as she has gotten older, everything is more moderated. If you can get your hands on a copy of their book (one is “How to be your dog’s best friend”, another is a puppy training book), I highly recommend them.
Thanks for the tips! :) I'll check out the book!
 

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Out of interest, how many were there in your puppy's litter? Singleton pups are notorious for missing out on how to deal with frustration, lacking the experience of rough and tumble with siblings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
Out of interest, how many were there in your puppy's litter? Singleton pups are notorious for missing out on how to deal with frustration, lacking the experience of rough and tumble with siblings.
There were 8 very boisterous puppies - plus usually 3 adult dogs around - so I don't think lack of contact or play with others was an issue at all. The times I visited they were all rolling around on top of each other. And actually he was the favorite puppy for everyone who was there to get a puppy because he was very friendly and social - i felt very lucky that I got him. Now I kind of wish I had a more quiet shy one haha... tho that comes with its own issues. Maybe part of it is that the puppies were basically allowed free rein on a farm to run and play around to their hearts content and I live in an apartment so it's just dog park and walks.
 

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Not a singleton, then! Just the life and soul of the party - which is probably easier to manage long term than shyness and timidity, as you say.
 
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