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I took my 4 mo old SPOO , Happy, on her first longer run (about 3.5 miles) this morning and she did GREAT!. Until today, it had mostly been impromptu jogs around the block. I kept a moderate pace so as no to push her too hard. I’m glad I did because if I had left it up her she would have destroyed me in the first two miles. She didn’t show signs of slowing down until about the last .25 mile. I thought she’d be pooped out, but she was back to full power within 15 minute of returning home. I’ll give some days to recover before I take her out again – I don’t want to over do it. I figured I’d have to wait until she was closer to a year before bringing her on runs, but she seemed ready to go. Before anyone mentions it, we went out before it got too warm, I brought water, and was prepared to stop at the fist sign of fatigue. I also monitored her pads.

We ran a popular path around a local lake here in N. VA with lots of foot and bike traffic. She did exceptionally well when passing other dogs/walkers/runners/bikes with no signs of fear or undue interest. Looks like I found myself a running partner. Anyone else running with their SPOOs?
 

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I never ran with mine, but they certainly helped train horses by running along side on the other side of the fence. They loved it and the horses found it somewhat amusing too. It's amazing how long and fast a well conditioned spoo can run.

You might want to take it easy on runs at this age. As well as the heat and the pad wear (good for you to think to check!) you also don't want to stress growing joints. Some running is good; it builds stronger bones. Too much running will lead to joint problems down the line.
 

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Yep, spoos and mpoos make great running partners. Like cowpony said, dogs are prone to the same repetitive motion damage that humans get, so go easy until the growth plates close.

Three variables to think about: on-leash vs off-leash, surface type (e.g. pavement, dirt trails), and time. Keep on-leash runs on pavement short; you can go longer on off-leash runs on dirt trails (where the dog is free to sprint, stop, sniff, jog, hop, jump, walk, trot, back-up, go sideways - in short, engage in non-repetitive movements).
 

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Yep, spoos and mpoos make great running partners. Like cowpony said, dogs are prone to the same repetitive motion damage that humans get, so go easy until the growth plates close.

Three variables to think about: on-leash vs off-leash, surface type (e.g. pavement, dirt trails), and time. Keep on-leash runs on pavement short; you can go longer on off-leash runs on dirt trails (where the dog is free to sprint, stop, sniff, jog, hop, jump, walk, trot, back-up, go sideways - in short, engage in non-repetitive movements).
Great advice, thanks.
 

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I never ran with mine, but they certainly helped train horses by running along side on the other side of the fence. They loved it and the horses found it somewhat amusing too. It's amazing how long and fast a well conditioned spoo can run.

You might want to take it easy on runs at this age. As well as the heat and the pad wear (good for you to think to check!) you also don't want to stress growing joints. Some running is good; it builds stronger bones. Too much running will lead to joint problems down the line.
This was a trial run and I plan to limit our sessions to no more than 2 to 3 times per week and a couple miles. I'll probably be the limiting factor when she's older. Thnx
 

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I'm concerned that my post was a wet blanket, and I just want to make sure that I'm clear that spoos are tremendous athletes and that running together is great for bonding. They love the partnership! And DC is a great area for running and dogs. Used to run Rock Creek past my office to TR or Mt. Vernon Trail ... I swear it was uphill both ways :) And can't beat Shirlington on a weekend...
 

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I'm concerned that my post was a wet blanket, and I just want to make sure that I'm clear that spoos are tremendous athletes and that running together is great for bonding. They love the partnership! And DC is a great area for running and dogs. Used to run Rock Creek past my office to TR or Mt. Vernon Trail ... I swear it was uphill both ways :) And can't beat Shirlington on a weekend...
No wet blanket. You brought up great points. We're not ready for off lead adventure yet. Even at four months, I see her athletic potential. Since you're in the DMV, can you recommend a good beach for dogs?
 

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No wet blanket. You brought up great points. We're not ready for off lead adventure yet. Even at four months, I see her athletic potential. Since you're in the DMV, can you recommend a good beach for dogs?
I wish I knew. We moved away several years ago, and never had the opportunity to explore beaches with the dogs.
 

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From another thread a few months ago:

How Much Exercise a Poodle Needs

Puppies
- For toys and miniatures under 1 year old and standards under 18 months old, owners must carefully schedule exercise times. Offering quick bouts of outdoor walking is a great way to for the puppy to discharge their abundant energy.
That being said, greatly exceeding exercise limits for puppies can be detrimental to their growth.

Why? During the first year for toys and miniature Poodles (and until about 18 months old for standard Poodles), the bones are still forming and growing. At the end of all major bones are growth plates; these are soft areas that contain rapidly dividing cells that are instrumental in allowing the bones to develop and grow longer as the Poodle pup matures from puppy to adult.

Once a Poodle is done with puberty and is officially an adult dog that is done growing (approx 18-24m), the plates harden and calcify. Until that time, over-exercise can cause injury to this soft bone tissue and interfere with normal bone growth.


So, you'll want to find a balance of enough walks, for the proper duration, to allow the pup to release energy and start becoming socialized to the world, yet be careful to not exercise your Poodle puppy to such an extent that it could possibly harm those growth plates.

Do keep in mind that normal play in the house, etc. is expected and a puppy needn't be crated to keep him from moving around! Over-exercise relates to repetitive actions such as running, walking briskly, etc. for an extended amount of time… It is important that a puppy romp around to his heart's desire… when he gets tired, he will rest. You just never want to push a young puppy into activity that puts stress on the body and raises the heartbeat if he is not up to it.

In looking at these guidelines, we must remember that the duration is the same, no matter the size of the dog. This is because it is the pace at which the dog moves that equates a state of exercise. Toys will trot and standard Poodles will trot, and it is the owner that will need to adjust the pace at which they walk to keep the dog going briskly.

A good rule of thumb is: 5 minutes per day, for each month of age. Here is a quick reference of recommended exercise times:

3 months old = One 15 minute walk each day
4 months old = Total of 20 minutes; this can be two 10 minute walks
5 months old = Total of 25 minutes; split into two walks
6 months old = Total of 30 minutes; split into three 10 or two 15 minute walks
7 months old = Total of 35 minutes; divided into two sessions
8 months old = Total of 40 minutes; best if done in three sessions (15, 15 and 10 minutes)
9 months old = Total of 45 minutes; best if done in three sessions (15, 15, 15)
10 months old = Total of 50 minutes; best if done in three sessions (20, 15, 15)
11 months old = Total of 55 minutes; best if done in three sessions (20, 15, 20)
For standards only, 12 months through 23 months = Continuation of 55 minutes (20, 15, 20). Toys and minis will at this point, move ahead to adult exercise requirements.

You'll want to go at a moderate pace that is not overwhelming. Young puppies are only starting to learn about how to walk on leash and it can take some time for them to focus on proper heeling. Ahead, we'll dive into tips to making walking a more pleasant experience coming up."

here's the link to that page:

 
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A tricky thing with dogs is they are hardwired to not show weakness. So they'll go and go and go, running on pure adrenaline, because this is what their body tells them to do to survive.

Happy returning to "full power" again after 15 minutes of rest tells me her cortisol levels were probably through the roof, and may stay that way for days.

I'm with Liz — I don't want to be a wet blanket on your joy. Having an exercise buddy is the best. But I'd probably shelve all jogging plans for the next year or so, and just focus on noodling around with Happy, letting her sniff and frolic in the grass, and practise lots and lots of settling so she doesn't turn into a little adrenaline junkie. :)

If you do want to take things up a notch, Happy should set the pace, and I'd recommend sticking to soft surfaces like grassy parks and natural trails.
 

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And also not trying to be a wet blanket by posting that info above, but I'm sure you want to do right by your girl. Until she's an adult, it's helpful to literally think of her as being in training, but not for endurance, rather for mobility and agility.

This is copied from another PF thread from a few years back:
"I think what's bad is repetitive movement. So jogging with the human for a long time isn't so good. It's a trot in a basically straight line and that's it...using the same muscles and ligaments the same way over and over. But when they can romp in the yard, stop, sniff a bush, turn, trot, canter, walk, I don't think it hurts a thing. I wouldn't get the pup overly tired but tired enough that he's ready for something else when he gets inside...like a nap or a quiet time with a chew toy."
 

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From another thread a few months ago:

How Much Exercise a Poodle Needs

Puppies
- For toys and miniatures under 1 year old and standards under 18 months old, owners must carefully schedule exercise times. Offering quick bouts of outdoor walking is a great way to for the puppy to discharge their abundant energy.
That being said, greatly exceeding exercise limits for puppies can be detrimental to their growth.

Why? During the first year for toys and miniature Poodles (and until about 18 months old for standard Poodles), the bones are still forming and growing. At the end of all major bones are growth plates; these are soft areas that contain rapidly dividing cells that are instrumental in allowing the bones to develop and grow longer as the Poodle pup matures from puppy to adult.

Once a Poodle is done with puberty and is officially an adult dog that is done growing (approx 18-24m), the plates harden and calcify. Until that time, over-exercise can cause injury to this soft bone tissue and interfere with normal bone growth.


So, you'll want to find a balance of enough walks, for the proper duration, to allow the pup to release energy and start becoming socialized to the world, yet be careful to not exercise your Poodle puppy to such an extent that it could possibly harm those growth plates.

Do keep in mind that normal play in the house, etc. is expected and a puppy needn't be crated to keep him from moving around! Over-exercise relates to repetitive actions such as running, walking briskly, etc. for an extended amount of time… It is important that a puppy romp around to his heart's desire… when he gets tired, he will rest. You just never want to push a young puppy into activity that puts stress on the body and raises the heartbeat if he is not up to it.

In looking at these guidelines, we must remember that the duration is the same, no matter the size of the dog. This is because it is the pace at which the dog moves that equates a state of exercise. Toys will trot and standard Poodles will trot, and it is the owner that will need to adjust the pace at which they walk to keep the dog going briskly.

A good rule of thumb is: 5 minutes per day, for each month of age. Here is a quick reference of recommended exercise times:

3 months old = One 15 minute walk each day
4 months old = Total of 20 minutes; this can be two 10 minute walks
5 months old = Total of 25 minutes; split into two walks
6 months old = Total of 30 minutes; split into three 10 or two 15 minute walks
7 months old = Total of 35 minutes; divided into two sessions
8 months old = Total of 40 minutes; best if done in three sessions (15, 15 and 10 minutes)
9 months old = Total of 45 minutes; best if done in three sessions (15, 15, 15)
10 months old = Total of 50 minutes; best if done in three sessions (20, 15, 15)
11 months old = Total of 55 minutes; best if done in three sessions (20, 15, 20)
For standards only, 12 months through 23 months = Continuation of 55 minutes (20, 15, 20). Toys and minis will at this point, move ahead to adult exercise requirements.

You'll want to go at a moderate pace that is not overwhelming. Young puppies are only starting to learn about how to walk on leash and it can take some time for them to focus on proper heeling. Ahead, we'll dive into tips to making walking a more pleasant experience coming up."

here's the link to that page:

Wow! That's some great info. I'm going to have cut down on what I've been doing with mine.
Continuously learning on this journey!
 

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PTP had mentioned Puppy Culture in another exercise related thread so I looked up Puppy Culture poodle exercise and got a number of results. This is the first up
 

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I agree that is way too much exercise for a puppy. I’m glad you read all the infos and hope you will wait until she is grown to take her jogging. A 15-20 minute walk is enough for her age.

In the long run, you will be glad you gave her the best chance to have strong bones and joints.
 

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And to take the thread in a slightly different direction, I just wanted to pop in and say hello @Happy'sDad! Fellow Northern VA (or rather, Arlington) resident here. We had a tiny toy poodle for 15 years who passed away earlier this year and we are anxiously awaiting our standard poodle puppy in November. Maybe there's a poodle puppy play date in our future!
 

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And to take the thread in a slightly different direction, I just wanted to pop in and say hello @Happy'sDad! Fellow Northern VA (or rather, Arlington) resident here. We had a tiny toy poodle for 15 years who passed away earlier this year and we are anxiously awaiting our standard poodle puppy in November. Maybe there's a poodle puppy play date in our future!
Wouldn't that be cute! I'll be waiting for the pics. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #19
And to take the thread in a slightly different direction, I just wanted to pop in and say hello @Happy'sDad! Fellow Northern VA (or rather, Arlington) resident here. We had a tiny toy poodle for 15 years who passed away earlier this year and we are anxiously awaiting our standard poodle puppy in November. Maybe there's a poodle puppy play date in our future!
Happy came to fill the void left by my late 16yo Jack Russells Terrier Ginger who passed in April. By happenstance, Happy was born the same day Ginger crossed the rainbow bridge. Congratulations on your soon to arrive puppy. Happy has been slightly timid with strange dogs, even other puppies. She loves my remainig senior JRT and is getting more confident with age. I mention this because you may experience the same thing. That said, I'd be happy to try introducing our pups, including any other local SPOOs, in the future. We're in Burke. Let me know.

Brian
 
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