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I got an e-mail from my service dog program and they have a couple spoos that they think will be a good match for me. They are both males and still with their puppy raisers. Once they are old enough, they will do another health check and start the advanced training.
It is still 6 months to a year away, but I know they have my dog! I'm super excited and to celebrate I'm going to start buying grooming supplies (so expect some questions there soon):rofl:
I don't know what color yet. I'm kind of hoping for a white but will obviously adore what ever color I get:)
 

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That's great news! Congrats - I know you'll be like a kid waiting for your birthday to HURRY UP AND GET HERE!! LOL

Is it horrible to say that I'm jealous of you because you will be able to take your poodle everywhere? ;)
 

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How exciting,it will be like waiting to have a baby with less pain as an end result ha,ha!
 

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That's great news! Congrats - I know you'll be like a kid waiting for your birthday to HURRY UP AND GET HERE!! LOL

Is it horrible to say that I'm jealous of you because you will be able to take your poodle everywhere? ;)
Lol, nah! Now if I could do it without the whole being gimpy part, that would be even better:pound: I wish the US was more dog friendly (for well-behaved dogs).
 

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That is great! Congrats!!! I am having Kiara go through more training in hopes of getting her TDI certified...she is my emotional support dog and I would love to be able to take her with me when my husband can not be there with me. After I breed her, I would like to set it up to have one of her pups go into a program like that for someone.
 

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That is great! Congrats!!! I am having Kiara go through more training in hopes of getting her TDI certified...she is my emotional support dog and I would love to be able to take her with me when my husband can not be there with me. After I breed her, I would like to set it up to have one of her pups go into a program like that for someone.
That is great! I do want to point out that getting her certified as a therapy dogs only allows you to take her to visit places like hospital, nursing homes, etc to cheer people up. It doesn't give you public access rights or make her a service dog.
This is something my friend wrote which is really helpful if someone wants to train their own dog as a service dog (the links relate to psychiatric service dogs but are good basics for any type):

The ADA defines a service dog as a dog who is individually trained to perform tasks or work that mitigates their handler's disability. This also means that the dog just being there does not qualify as a task or work.

Step 1: Talk with your doctor, verify that your disability meets ADA standards, and discuss what work or tasks a dog could do to assist you. Talk with other service dog owners about the pros and cons of living with a service dog, reading these webpages for more information Psychiatric Service Dog Society and Psychiatric Service Dog Society Determine what tasks/work your dog could do to mitigate your disability. For example, training your dog to retrieve is only a task if you can not do that on your own.

Step 2: Find a trainer and have your dog temperament tested to make sure they are likely to make it as a service dog-- any sign of aggression in a dog's past (towards humans or other animals) is unacceptable in a service dog candidate in my opinion. Talk with the trainer and/or a vet to be sure your dog can safely do the work/tasks needed to assist you. Also have your dog examined by a vet to make sure they are healthy enough to work. If you don't have a dog, or your dog is not suitable for service work, read this article for help deciding what breed and where to get the dog: Psychiatric Service Dog Society and hire a professional trainer to help you pick a dog.

Step 3: Master basic obedience at home, in local parks, in petstores, and in other dog friendly stores-- some hardware stores and bookstores will allow pets, call and ask. Make sure to start keeping a training log of what you are doing, how your dog is doing with obedience, public access and assistance behaviors. Find a trainer able to assist you. Also, start learning both the Americans with Disabilities Act and your local laws (which will tell you if your service dog in training gets public access or not. SDiTs aren't covered by the ADA)

Step 4: Once your dog is pretty much able to pass the CGC (in other words could do it with the use of a few treats, or could do it all except for the leaving the dog alone bit) purchase a vest and in training patches, and visit the places in step 3 with the vest on. If you haven't already started training tasks/work, start that now, too. It is helpful to have a trainer who is familiar with service dogs to help you through this process. If you have never trained a service dog before, it is very difficult to so it by yourself the fist time.

Step 5: Gradually visit more and more difficult environments-- saving places with lots of crowds, food etc for later. Train to the public access standard on the PSDS website.

Step 6: If you live in a state with SDIT protection, spend another few months to a year in training just to make sure you're both really comfortable with whatever comes up. Really, it's not a race! Slow is fast with service dog training.

Step 7: Take a public access test like the one here http://www.psychdog.org/attach/Public_Access_Standard_Test_Sheet.pdf and have someone videotape it if possible. If you don't have a trainer who can give the test, have a friend do it. The idea is that your dog should be able to perform these things, and if you ever have a court case, video proof of this may be helpful, or at least a letter from a trainer saying that you did the things.

Also, PSDS has an owner training standard that lists the steps in a slightly different format here:
Psychiatric Service Dog Society

Also remember that if you have an intact service dog, you won't be able to work her while she is in heat. A service dog can legally be ejected for making a mess.
Hope this helps a bit!
 

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How exciting!!!! The wait must be awful though!!


As Karma said, therapy dogs do not have the same right to access as service dogs, although I believe in New York, they are making policy changes that will allow therapy dogs in public spaces. I think it's a terrible idea though.
 

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I'm so glad to hear you have a service dog reserved with "your name on it"! I understand the wait for one can be interminable. I'm delighted a poodle will soon be at your side to help you on your way. I just know you're going to have the best time with either male they match you to. I wish you a long, successful relationship with your service poo and I hope the waiting time flies by fast (not a chance of that, though, huh?).
 

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This is very exciting. Do you have any idea how long it will be before you know which one? I know they have such a detailed program for training. It will be well worth the wait.
 

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This is very exciting. Do you have any idea how long it will be before you know which one? I know they have such a detailed program for training. It will be well worth the wait.
Sometime in te next 6 months, depending on the dog.
 

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Yay!! A light at the end of the waiting tunnel is so exciting! Another internet friend of mine has a service spoo! Actually, he's retired now because of hip problems, but still lives with them. If you'd like to talk w/another who's been there, done this with a spoo, let me know and I'll hook you up.

Also, the letter your friend wrote is fabulous. Would she mind if I copy it and keep it on hand for all of the requests from our therapy animal organization regarding service dogs? It answers a lot of questions we're often asked but not qualified to answer.

And locket, I'm so with you on this. I hope, hope, hope this isn't true. I'm an evaluator of therapy dogs, and our evaluation DEFINITELY does not test dogs for the right of public access. Our evaluation takes place in one room and lasts about 20 minutes. It looks at basic obedience, and their temperament when faced with situations they'll come across in a nursing home/care center. It doesn't evaluate the dog's behavior in restaurants, busy streets, on public transportation, in elevators, grocery stores...geez, the list could go on and on. Plus that, why on earth would a therapy dog need public access? You're going grocery shopping and all of a sudden, in the produce isle, you come across a person who is grieving and needs the comfort of a dog?? C'mon. . .
I'd love to see their argument for this. I'll shut up now. . . didn't mean to hijack.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Yay!! A light at the end of the waiting tunnel is so exciting! Another internet friend of mine has a service spoo! Actually, he's retired now because of hip problems, but still lives with them. If you'd like to talk w/another who's been there, done this with a spoo, let me know and I'll hook you up.

Also, the letter your friend wrote is fabulous. Would she mind if I copy it and keep it on hand for all of the requests from our therapy animal organization regarding service dogs? It answers a lot of questions we're often asked but not qualified to answer.
I would love to talk to your friend! While I'm not new to service dogs, I am new to having a poodle SD and would love to talk to someone who has done it already.
I sent her an e-mail to see if you can use it. I'll let you know once she gets back to me!
 

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I'm just curious because I've read about the Delta Society not allowing therapy dogs who eat a raw diet. Will you be feeding your spoo raw? Does the organization tell you what you can and can't feed once the dog is with you?
 

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I will be feeding raw and my program does allow us to make our own food choices. Once my dog and I "graduate" from our 1-2 week training, his ownership will be signed over to me.
I'm pretty seriously immune compromised and I haven't gotten anything since I started raw feeding. I clean up poop, I clean litter boxes and I have had no adverse affects. I wash my hands after handling meat, I wipe the bowls and crates down (although everyone is very dainty and eats out of their bowls). Obviously, I disagree with Delta Society's policy.:fish:
 
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