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Hi everyone,

I searched the other threads about crate sizes and I am still a little uncertain whether this crate size would fit the expected size of our future adult poodle.

The main issue I am having is I don't know how big/tall an adult poodle head will be based off the height of the withers.

If the adult poodle wither will be max 20 inches, then will the following crate size be good?

36" length x 23" width and 25" height. They advertise it for a dog up to 65 pounds, but I get the impression that poodles are relatively speaking more of an elongated elegant breed rather than a chunkier one. So I imagine the weights don't mean anything.

The same store is also offering 42" length x 27" width and 30" height (for up to 90 pounds)

(Of note, I did see a crate size of 36" x 24" x 27" but it was much more expensive because it was from a different brand).


Also, I did read about height of exercise pens and I got the impression that for a smaller standard poodle (e.g. max 20 inches at the withers) that a height of 36 or 42" would be good. We were thinking of using it mainly for when our dog is a puppy, so are thinking of opting for 36" to save a bit on space and money.

Thanks everyone!
 

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You're right to question the weight guidelines. Poodles have rather unusual proportions.

By the time Peggy reached about 18" at the shoulder, she was uncomfortable in her 36" crate. We would hear her crashing about at night, hitting the sides as she tried to get comfortable.

The first night she barked, we upgraded to 48" and we've not heard her since.

She's now about 21.5" and this is absolutely the right size crate for her, considering she sleeps in there overnight for up to 12 hours at a time. Just be sure to get a crate with a moveable divider so it can grow with your puppy.

Our x-pen is 36" and the perfect size. If your poodle is a climber, he or she will find a way out regardless of the height, so you make clear from day 1 that the sides aren't to be touched. We gave an "ah" sound and then ignored Peggy until she lowered her paw. And then we heaped her with praise and attention. This training wasn't just for the x-pen. We wanted her to respect all fences.

She could easily clear our backyard fence if she wanted to, but don't tell her that. ;)

P.S. There's really no guarantee when it comes to your poodle's finishing size. I hope your breeder has made that clear. They can only give their best estimate.
 

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Javelin is 24" at withers and for time in a crate at my club I store a 48" crate for him, but that one does not fit well in my truck so for travel to shows and workshops I have a 36" long one. He has to have a wire crate since he has wrecked a bunch of soft crates and I got tired of buying new ones or having to order new covers. Teh travel crate is honestly a squeeze if he stands up a lot, but he lies down to rest and it is just fine for him.
 

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Good point raised by Lily cd re: The size you'll need does depend on what you plan to use the crate for. If Peggy was only in hers for short periods, we'd have been fine sticking with the 36".

And if we didn't have the space, we'd probably have gone with 42".
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Peggy and Lily,

How do you feel about the height of the crate?

Would a height of 25" probably be okay if the withers of the dog is 20"? Or should it be higher like 27" or 30"!
 

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Ours is 32.5" tall. I dont think you'd want to go lower than 30" for anything but very short periods of use. Rule of thumb is 4" clearance on all sides.

This might seem generous, but it only allows for minimal stretching.
 

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I've been wondering the same thing about crate sizes. Also, I read that I may have to move the crate around from room to room. Like if you are crating while making dinner in the kitchen/living room area, then the crate needs to be there, but then move it to the bedroom with you for sleep. The 42 inch one doesn't fit through my doors. So in planning for my puppy I've been at a loss which size to get. I'd get the bigger size but then I won't be able to move it from room to room without taking it down and then putting it back up. Have you measured your doors?
 

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I've never heard of moving a crate around like that. Are you following a specific trainer's advice?

Some people do have a crate for their main living space and another in the bedroom. That sounds like a better option to me than moving one around.

Dogs can get a little funny when their crate is moved. They have to sniff and explore and investigate all over again. It's nice to have it in a fixed spot, which becomes their home base.
 

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I've been wondering the same thing about crate sizes. Also, I read that I may have to move the crate around from room to room. Like if you are crating while making dinner in the kitchen/living room area, then the crate needs to be there, but then move it to the bedroom with you for sleep. The 42 inch one doesn't fit through my doors. So in planning for my puppy I've been at a loss which size to get. I'd get the bigger size but then I won't be able to move it from room to room without taking it down and then putting it back up. Have you measured your doors?
We really never moved crates around as you are thinking you might need/want to do. If the pup is in the crate in another room cover it with a sheet to suggest it is nappy time and help the baby dog to learn how to self soothe there. The other possibility is to tether the pup to you if it is safe to do so as a way to work on learning potty signs and to do a bit of bonding.
 

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I've never heard of moving a crate around like that. Are you following a specific trainer's advice?

Some people do have a crate for their main living space and another in the bedroom. That sounds like a better option to me than moving one around.

Dogs can get a little funny when their crate is moved. They have to sniff and explore and investigate all over again. It's nice to have it in a fixed spot, which becomes their home base.
Peggy, it depends on the dog. Show dogs have their crates moved constantly and are just happy to have a place of their own.
 

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Peggy, it depends on the dog. Show dogs have their crates moved constantly and are just happy to have a place of their own.
I've never heard of moving a crate around like that. Are you following a specific trainer's advice?

Some people do have a crate for their main living space and another in the bedroom. That sounds like a better option to me than moving one around.

Dogs can get a little funny when their crate is moved. They have to sniff and explore and investigate all over again. It's nice to have it in a fixed spot, which becomes their home base.
I would also think I'd want them used to having the crate moved around. What if we go visit someone and I have to crate them at night in another house? Or a hotel? I'm planning on traveling with him to various places to go hiking, we're going to eventually stay in quite a few hotels. Also, I'm in Florida and even though it does not happen often, I've had to evacuate in the path of a hurricane before. I would want him to be used to his crate in odd scenarios and not freak out. Or am I thinking about this all wrong?

It's also been mentioned by a few trainers on YouTube videos. One said to crate when watching TV, or in the kitchen when working, etc. Just short bursts to get the dog used to the crate without it always being sleepy time or leaving the house time. Though the crate in their videos (and the dog) was a lot smaller. I'm planning on getting a local trainer for him (us since I need training too) but currently am still looking.

Edit: Also, there could be possible plane travel in the (very distant) future. I'd like to train the pup for a bunch of possible scenarios so he will feel comfortable regardless of odd surroundings.
 

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Peggy, it depends on the dog. Show dogs have their crates moved constantly and are just happy to have a place of their own.
That makes sense. But when crate training a puppy, I do think it really helps to have a consistent place for him or her to retreat to. I even go so far as to keep a water dish mounted inside the crate.
 

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I would also think I'd want them used to having the crate moved around. What if we go visit someone and I have to crate them at night in another house? Or a hotel? I'm planning on traveling with him to various places to go hiking, we're going to eventually stay in quite a few hotels. Also, I'm in Florida and even though it does not happen often, I've had to evacuate in the path of a hurricane before. I would want him to be used to his crate in odd scenarios and not freak out. Or am I thinking about this all wrong?

It's also been mentioned by a few trainers on YouTube videos. One said to crate when watching TV, or in the kitchen when working, etc. Just short bursts to get the dog used to the crate without it always being sleepy time or leaving the house time. Though the crate in their videos (and the dog) was a lot smaller. I'm planning on getting a local trainer for him (us since I need training too) but currently am still looking.
No, you're not thinking about it wrong. There's no perfect method. Once my puppy is crate trained, I bring it along to hotels, etc. But I personally have found that early consistency to be helpful.

For moving puppy around the house with me, I use a leash (tether) either attached to me or to a fixed object, such as a doorknob or baseboard anchor. I also used an x-pen in a central location for puppy Peggy, which allowed her to see me moving around the house, coming and going.
 

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No, you're not thinking about it wrong. There's no perfect method. Once my puppy is crate trained, I bring it along to hotels, etc. But I personally have found that early consistency to be helpful.

For moving puppy around the house with me, I use a leash (tether) either attached to me or to a fixed object, such as a doorknob or baseboard anchor. I also used an x-pen in a central location for puppy Peggy, which allowed her to see me moving around the house, coming and going.
Makes sense. I guess I'll have to prepare for different scenarios and then take the lead from the puppy, with what he is or isn't comfortable at first. And then go slowly from there.
 

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Makes sense. I guess I'll have to prepare for different scenarios and then take the lead from the puppy, with what he is or isn't comfortable at first. And then go slowly from there.
I always recommend Ian Dunbar's crate training methods to new puppy owners, but whichever you choose, I suggest being as consistent as possible in those early days.

It can be overwhelming with all the information available online, and conflicting advice from well-meaning friends and family. But consistency cultivates confidence, not just for your puppy but also for you!
 

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Hi everyone,

I searched the other threads about crate sizes and I am still a little uncertain whether this crate size would fit the expected size of our future adult poodle.

The main issue I am having is I don't know how big/tall an adult poodle head will be based off the height of the withers.

If the adult poodle wither will be max 20 inches, then will the following crate size be good?

36" length x 23" width and 25" height. They advertise it for a dog up to 65 pounds, but I get the impression that poodles are relatively speaking more of an elongated elegant breed rather than a chunkier one. So I imagine the weights don't mean anything.

The same store is also offering 42" length x 27" width and 30" height (for up to 90 pounds)

(Of note, I did see a crate size of 36" x 24" x 27" but it was much more expensive because it was from a different brand).


Also, I did read about height of exercise pens and I got the impression that for a smaller standard poodle (e.g. max 20 inches at the withers) that a height of 36 or 42" would be good. We were thinking of using it mainly for when our dog is a puppy, so are thinking of opting for 36" to save a bit on space and money.

Thanks everyone!
I think crate measurements fail to account for the legginess of poodles. My boy Galen was predicted to end up around 23 inches. (At 8 months he's now 24".) He went on a growth spurt at around 4 months. By 5 months he couldn't lie down comfortably in a 36" crate. His long back and long legs were touching every wall. He could fold himself up to get inside, but he really wasn't comfortable.
We upgraded him to a 42 inch crate for nights and Pogo's old 48 inch crate when we have to leave him confined during the day. The 42 " is fine when he's sleeping or for short confinement periods. His head brushed the top of the 42". I prefer to have him in the 48" for longer daytime confinement, as he can stand, stretch, and roll a puzzle ball around. He doesn't hit his head on the 48".

Regarding xpens, I have never seen the need for one taller than 30". A determined dog can go over even a 36" or 48" barrier. Therefore, I dont leave dogs unsupervised in xpens. 30" is high enough that a young dog will measure it out before attempting to go over; my job is to notice the idea forming and tell him not to even dream about it.
 
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