Poodle Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Spoo pup will turn one in a week and lately seems to have figured out the concept of trading things.

She has a tendency to steal stuff and then run. It’s super-fun to play “keep away” from mom. Earlier this week, she stole my sock as I was getting ready to take her out. When I said “if you give me the sock, we can go for a walk”, she brought it and dropped it at my feet. Last night she grabbed a yogurt container one of the kids had left on the table. In response to “give me that and I’ll give you some ice cream”, she dropped it. I didn’t even have the treat near me, but she seems to have figured out trading. (Also, it’s dog ice cream, and it’s her most favorite treat ever. She gets it about once a week or so. Don’t worry - I’m not feeding my precious puppy Ben&Jerrys. :act-up:

I’ve tried this a couple of times when it looks like she’s decided the trade wasn’t worth it. There’s a pause, and then back to running. A boring “cookie” just isn’t worth giving up fun paper to shred.

If this is for real, she’s the smartest dog I’ve ever had, by far. Can a poodle reason like this, or am I just projecting?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
586 Posts
I think poodles can understand a lot of words. And she probably is picking cue words here like walk and ice cream. The rest are just “noise”. I could be talking to my kids about getting dressed,etc. Then when I tell them, “let’s go”, milo bolts to the front door and waits by his leash for me. It’s his cue word that we are going in the car..lol. So I now use, “we are leaving” for the kids...:aetsch: anyways a smart cookie you have there!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,858 Posts
No, you are definitely not projecting! I enjoyed reading your post. It made me chuckle. Lucky steals socks all the time but I've trained him to pull them off of me and he brings it to me for reward. Sometimes he brings socks from the laundry to me when I first come through the front door. Spoos is one of the best abstract thinkers I've ever trained. They tend to connect the dots a lot better than other breds. They study your behavioral and speech pattern and connect the dots. I don't know if they understand ice cream but they understand "if i bring socks, then x" and x is always a positive thing. I hope you continue posting these fun stories.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,730 Posts
I think she’s been conditioned that by dropping stuff at your feet, she gets something to eat.

She’s smart, she got it fast !
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,614 Posts
she is definitely smart. she knows when she is being offered something really high value (to her) in exchange for something she has. not every dog makes the connection that a treat is often akin to a trade and there’s a scale of value involved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,502 Posts
Ithink they understand more than we give them credit for. I have coffee every morning, sometimes one of my friends will call and stop by. If I clean the counter before coming to the office they all run to the door. When put mu housecoat on of an evening the get all excited, they know I am staying home and will go to the living room and get in their beds, prior they will follow me all over the house. Sage is shy, I can say Aunt Dixie is coming to the door she will go, if I say uncle Ray is coming she goes under the desk in the office, she does not like him. Don't ever tell them will will go for a car ride until I am ready to go, they will whine, get their lease and coats and bring them to measthey fidget, fidget until we start out the door.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
596 Posts
I have taught trading to all my dogs from puppyhood. It is really useful when they run off with something delicate or not good for them - and it is also helpful with a drop it command - which could save their lives when out and about. Drop it - at least at the beginning - is basically a trade since they get rewarded with a treat. I have had to use it once for Louie in serious situation when he found gum on a walk (potential for Xylitol). Usually we just practice with a leaf or acorn.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,151 Posts
...I’ve tried this a couple of times when it looks like she’s decided the trade wasn’t worth it. There’s a pause, and then back to running. A boring “cookie” just isn’t worth giving up fun paper to shred.

If this is for real, she’s the smartest dog I’ve ever had, by far. Can a poodle reason like this, or am I just projecting?
Yes indeed, she's very bright and a lot of fun to watch her think about her options. I've been reading this forum regularly for a over a year now, and it's characteristic that many poodles have, and in my view, it's very human. My own showed this pattern of blossoming in her cognitive processing and it's been a delight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,545 Posts
Yes they are very smart indeed. Renn is about the same age he too picks up on cue words though I often just speak to him like he was another human. He knows leave it, and drop it very well as on our walks he would grab things, And in the morning I have my coffee at the computer while he has his breakfast next to me. When he is done I tell him to lie down and rest his belly, then he will lie next to me and sleep while I mess on the computer. Sometimes he will stop or bark at me and I'll ask him what do you want? Do you need a drink? He will immediately go into straight up attentive sit, then Iknow ok thats what he wants. They are really smart.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
331 Posts
Minis are pretty smart too.
One day I was watching a YouTube video about the Place command. My 4 month old puppy ran up to the TV screen and watched with me, wagging her tail everytime the instructor spoke.
When it finished she gave me a look and so I laid a little towel on the floor and said ok let’s do it... and by god as soon as I said Mimi Place she went right over to the towel and laid down


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
22,982 Posts
Poodles are wildly smart and I do think they can understand a lot of words but not the way we understand those words. A person can conceptualize what sit means when asked to do so and will look around for appropriate places to do so. A dog has to learn to associate the sound of the word sit with the action of assuming a sit and they have to be taught that in many different places to get to the point where they generalize that to doing a sit anytime they hear that word. I also think they are pretty clever about figuring things out like making trades for things of higher value than the naughty thing they just stole, but smart enough to understand lengthy conversation, nope. I think what they hear when we talk at length is like Charlie Brown's teacher's talking or in Seinfeld speak: yadda yadda sit yadda yadda cookie yadda yadda lie down...


I actually think it is unfair and perhaps even a bit dangerous to believe that a dog understands conversational communication. Information for a dog to respond to should be very clear and direct and associated with absolutely definite responses to the order being given.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
331 Posts
Case in point, I just this minute got up to see what Mimi was up to and found this.


She’d dragged the welcome mat from inside out to the porch to have a nice siesta in the sun. I’m surprised she didn’t make herself a piña colada too.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,502 Posts
Poodles are wildly smart and I do think they can understand a lot of words but not the way we understand those words. A person can conceptualize what sit means when asked to do so and will look around for appropriate places to do so. A dog has to learn to associate the sound of the word sit with the action of assuming a sit and they have to be taught that in many different places to get to the point where they generalize that to doing a sit anytime they hear that word. I also think they are pretty clever about figuring things out like making trades for things of higher value than the naughty thing they just stole, but smart enough to understand lengthy conversation, nope. I think what they hear when we talk at length is like Charlie Brown's teacher's talking or in Seinfeld speak: yadda yadda sit yadda yadda cookie yadda yadda lie down...


I actually think it is unfair and perhaps even a bit dangerous to believe that a dog understands conversational communication. Information for a dog to respond to should be very clear and direct and associated with absolutely definite responses to the order being given.
I agree with dogs wanting the out come in treats or praise, but I do feel they co understand short conversations. A couple of examples:

I am on the phone, and I say sure stop by what time. Immediately they all run to the door and bark, and I say not now later. Within 15 to 20 or so minutes Cayenne runs to the door and whines. This coninues until the person arrives.

Another example: I will say go potty and we will go by by later, they come back in and watch me, say 10 to 15 minutes later fidgeting then here comes Cayenne with her coat, (other 2 follow her lead) and chirps, the other dogs gets theirs, then they watch every move I make (normally lay under the desk when I leave the office for coffee). not after I tell them by by later they follow me everywhere. There are no treats or praise with any of this just comments on the phone, or to them. Normally they go potty with no by by promised.

At Night they want on my lap I say no mommy needs space they walk away and look at me then will go to their beds.

When company is here and 99% love my dogs, I have often said, "I love my girls and cannot imagine being without them". Instantly they want down from whomever is holding them and want me to pick them up, which I don't. It maybe because I talk to them as I would a human using long phrases.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
22,982 Posts
glorybee I still don't think that means dogs understand sentences. They are hearing key words they recognize most probably. this doesn't mean they aren't smart, but we do have to remember they don't speak English (or French or German or any other human language). They learn through donditioning that certain sounds mean certain kinds of things need to be done or are going to happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
331 Posts
Dodi, I thought long ago that Mimi just looks smart. Some dogs just have that extra vibe and she proves she's at the top of her game. Your tv experience with her and dragging the mat to the sun had me smiling, this puppy girl is sharp.

Update: Vita, when I went out again later to check on her she had chewed the mat up.
So maybe I “overestimated”? lol


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
22,982 Posts
Update: Vita, when I went out again later to check on her she had chewed the mat up.
So maybe I “overestimated”? lol


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Sounds like a yuppers. Not to beat on you Dodi, but that was your fail. Don't blame Mimi.


Remember dogs are like toddlers, somewhat poor on judgement and impulse control left to their own devices and occasionally brilliant when given good information from their peeps.
 
  • Like
Reactions: doditwo

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,266 Posts
My girl Grace lives with two "old farts" She would rather have a couple of children or another dog to play with. She has become a TV addict. She will watch ,uninterrupted, ball games, most sports, and anything with animals in it or large green areas. She especially likes the start of swimming and racing and barks sharply as the athletes start. Her vocabulary has enlarged a great deal as a result. We have graduated from "shall we go to the beach and throw a ball for Gracie" Through "Shall we take the round thing and the wooly woofer to the water" and on to "Should I put my shoes on?" Now she will bring my shoes to me one at a time and sit at attention occasionally looking at the door then back at me. Smart, YES. Wide vocabulary, YES. Sentence construction and syntax, NO.


P9100004.jpg






Eric
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top