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Discussion Starter #1
Mia was injured getting out of the car yesterday. She landed with a shriek and came up favoring her front right paw. She hobbled inside, collapsed, and has basically slept ever since. She's gotten up only a few times and is still hobbling.

I haven't taken her to the emergency vet because (1) she refuses to move, (2) covid, and (3) I really only trust my vet. Should I hold off until tomorrow when she can see her regular vet or bite the bullet and get her into the car? She hates being carried.

Sat ~ 9:20 am - injury
Sat 2 pm - back stairs, peed, ate
Sat evening - fed her on her bed (no moving around)
Sun 12 am - front door (no stairs), walked around the house to her favorite pee spot, peed
Sun 12 pm - went outside, no pee, ate, didn't see if she drank
 

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I understand not wanting to go to a vet you don't know, but we have had to do it this spring a couple of times and it has been all for the good. Prepare for the idea that you may not be allowed in with her, but that may be true at your regular vet too. I would not want to allow pain to continue if avoidable and depending on the nature of her injury risk a compromised recovery. I know it will be hard, but I also know you want to do the best for your pupster.
 

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Oh poor Mia. Since the accident happened so early Saturday I think emergency vet is a good idea. If they accomplish nothing else, they should be able send x-rays over so that you regular vet can take a look first thing Monday morning. Since there is no guarantee your vet has an appointment open first thing, having those images and another vet's assessment might get you a head start on a treatment or surgery plan.
 

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Thanks all, we're back home now. It's confirmed soft tissue and she's on pain meds.

When I grabbed my purse and keys to head to the emergency vet, she eagerly if three-leggedly made her way to the door, refused to stop and pee, and headed straight for the car. Given her sudden energy and mobility, I decided to stop at a nearby park and see if she'd pee/poop. I figured we wouldn't get past the parking lot (I didn't even lock my car), but she lead me on a gimpy 3/4 mile walk through the woods and peed several times, and then felt frisky enough to chase a squirrel (!!!) and climb down into some very questionable water for a drink and to cool off.

I just picked her up from the vet and all is well. She drank a ton, ate again, and is napping on the cold floor instead of her tempurpedic bed or in her corner where she hides when she doesn't feel well. It's safe to say she's on the mend.
 

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I’m glad you had Mia checked out and it’s just a soft tissue injury. Hopefully she will be back to normal soon.
 
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Did your vet give you instructions on prohibited activities? I had to keep Buck restricted. On a leash for ten days, an eternity in poodle years.
 

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Yes, she's restricted. Trust me, after she took off after that squirrel, she will not be off leash again this week. (My bad, but I really didn't think we'd walk more than 100 yards. I didn't lock my car or take my purse/keys! I was relieved, concerned, and amused all at once.)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Just wanted to share an update with an empathetic and understanding group... because this is so hard. The carprofen has kicked in and it's very difficult to keep Mia calm, rested, and off her wrist. She is feeling frisky! She's playful and her appetite is back (mixed blessing since I don't want her gaining weight, but am happy to see her feeling better).

She's not supposed to do anything for 2 weeks (how???) and no swimming for 4 weeks (again - how???). We're back to playing Hide and Seek in the house, and I've started walking her around the house on pee trips (slightly longer than the vet wanted, but she's on lead and not running free). I may add some trips in the car, windows down, so she can spot squirrels and sniff the air, and have a modicum of mental stimulation.

Twelve more days of this, harrumph.
 

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Oh goodness, yes. Soooo hard. All I can do is sympathize.

I wonder if easing up on the pain pills might help a little. Or is that cruel? I've done that myself when I don't want to inadvertently make an injury worse, even eliminating the medication altogether during the day and just using it for restorative sleep.
 

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I wonder if easing up on the pain pills might help a little. Or is that cruel? I've done that myself when I don't want to inadvertently make an injury worse, even eliminating the medication altogether during the day and just using it for restorative sleep.
Great minds, Robin!
 

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Hey, I'm just finding this conversation. I've always felt that pain is nature's way of telling us to slow down or to do something different. When sick a few years ago, I refused pain meds b/c I wanted to know at all times what my body was telling me and the precise location, both before and in the hospital. This played a role in saving my life.

This brings me to Mia. The meds are telling her that she's fine, and she acts accordingly. If she were my dog, I'd take her off them. Her body would tell her to not run or jump. She'd be uncomfortable, but she'd rest, do no further damage to herself, and heal. You might also be able to tell by any whining whether she's getting better or worse. It's not a strategy for everyone, and if too difficult to watch her in discomfort, perhaps cut the dosage in half.
 

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When Sophy slipped a disc and was on strict crate rest for three weeks the first week or so was fairly easy - even with pain relief she knew moving would hurt and wanted to be careful. As she began to recover it got more difficult. I set up a lot of scent games that didn't involve too much moving - three pots, one treat; muffin tins with objects in the holes and one or two treats; tiny treats hidden within a few feet so I could keep her leashed, etc, etc. She loves massage, so I did lots of that, avoiding the injured area of course.

We did frequent very short trips outside - I carried her as much as possible, then let her sniff around on leash on level surfaces. Indoors she was leashed to me or crated. Around day 9 it became the way things were for her, and easier for me; by day 19 she was trying to run zoomies on a 6 foot leash, and I let her walk rather more on level surfaces. Day 21, on my vet's advice, I let her off to run, and started slowly building back up our walking. Dogs can lose a lot of muscle fast when restricted, and for Sophy strong core muscles are essential to keep her back healthy.
 
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