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HI all - from reading / being a member of this board/ & researching on web

I now realizing that my sweet boy did not come from the greatest of breeder

A little history - we have various allergies in my household. Our allergist said the only dog he would recommend for our family would be a poodle. I started researching the breed and realizing how expensive a new puppy would cost in my area - California - starting from $ 1,000 on up.

After two years my husband and I purchased Winston from a breeder. We found him through an ad in the paper. AKC reg pups from AKC parents.Hand raised yada yada . At very inexpensive price considering the going rate for a pup here in CA

Winston was the second to last pup left. Both parents where on premise - Mom was Brown and Dad was white. Both beautiful and very friendly. I did ask about health of parents - breeder verbally said that both parents are fine

We picked up Winston at 3 months well groomed - fresh bath, nice shaved face, feet and chicken nugget tail (lol), and paper trained. I asked the breeder what type of food and toys he was eating etc

She told me that she was giving the puppies Pedigree Adult small kibble and that the puppies would chew on pig ears. I had no idea this was poor nutrition at the time

So after the fact - just talking to dog folks, petsmart employess , our vet etc People could not believe that a reputable breeder would feed a standard pedigree adult food and pig ears to chew on. THen next i learned that his tail was docked WAY WAY WAY to short

All in all - i just wanna say - i'm glad that i found this group - I'm glad that i have my sweet boy winston and i hope that he continues to grow healthy and happy. Thanks for answering all of my 50 million questions :rofl:
 

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Live and learn, many of us have done the very same thing or something similar. I agree finding this forum has shed a lot of light on things. :)

Maybe you can check Winstons pedigree to see what the health history may be or post it here and someone like cbrand (or others) can look it up quick for you. (just do you know and to prepare if need be)

You have a sweet kid there! With a short bunny tail too. You will love him no less.

Did you have a contract?
 

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Welcome to the vast number of people who were snookered by their first "breeder" purchase!! :)

When my daughter, Katy, turned 18 years old; she decided she wanted to own her own dog (I had three dogs of my own at home... what was one more??) She knew she wanted a standard poodle because, at the time, she worked at PetSmart grooming salon and LOVED LOVED LOVED the standard poodles that came in for grooming. She also wanted to learn how to groom poodles on her own.

We found an ad on our local online classified advertising site offering standard poodle puppies. The "breeder" only lived about 1 1/2 hours away, so Katy and I drove up to check out the babies... Katy picked a sweet brown baby girl and placed her deposit (Chalumeau's dad was brown and mom was white/cream - and a mini, to boot!!) :scared: Meau's tail is also docked way too short and she suffered seizures between about 4 and 6 months of age - they dissipated after Meau was spayed (knock on wood) but we're aware that she could be a ticking time bomb - her parents weren't tested and we're positive that this "breeder" is pretty much the definition of backyard breeder!! When I contacted her a few months after getting Meau to let her know how she was doing - she really couldn't have cared less! Very sad!

We couldn't love Meau any more if she were a champion of the UNIVERSE and we count our blessings that she came to live with us - in fact, it was Meau's charisma and charm that decided my husband and me to look for a spoo of our own! We did it much better the second time around by getting our gorgeous red girl out of fully tested parents and a breeder who is THERE whenever we need her (and even when we just want to have a friendly chat for absolutely no reason at all!)

Have fun with your sweet Winston and enjoy him for the wonderful individual that he is (I've come to the conclusion that these babies can't help being born to horrid breeders - but we can do our best to give them the best lives, ever!!) :hug:
 

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Don't worry, we all learn as we go along. Stick around the boards here for a while and you'll learn more than you ever hoped. Your pup is sweet regardless, and the chicken nugget tail just adds to his cuteness :).

Feeding adult food isn't uncommon, but it's usually supplemented with other foods. (chicken, cottage cheese, veggies, etc...) Some breeders feel that adult food causes a pup to grow too quickly. There is a lot of info available on this site, and by doing a Google search. Before you know it you'll be overwhelmed by food options LOL.

How is potty training going?
 

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Don't feel bad. Hopefully others will learn from your experience. My greatest wish is that people will spend time researching before they buy and will learn what to look for in a breeder and a Poodle.

Warning signs about your "breeder" that others can learn from:

1. Short tails on puppies are a sign that the breeder does not know the breed standard.

2. Good Poodle breeders do not breed Brown to White/Cream.

3. Good breeders usually don't advertise in the newspaper.

4. Good breeders provide written proof of completed health testing. They don't just give a verbal "OK".

5. Good breeders do things with their dogs (show, obedience, agility, hunt, therapy) to prove that they are worth breeding. They don't just breed their dogs for the sake of breeding.

6. Unless they have Champion stud dogs, good breeders rarely have both mom and dad on premises. This is because the goal with breeding is to breed to a stud who is not only superior in quality, but one that will compliment and hopefully fix the faults in a breeding bitch. The chances that a breeder has that stud dog at home are slim. Most good breeders seek outside stud service.

7. While we are more than happy to answer your 50 million questions, :) a good breeder will be knowledgeable about Poodles and will be ready, willing and able to answer all of your questions as a new owner.
 

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Have fun with your sweet Winston and enjoy him for the wonderful individual that he is (I've come to the conclusion that these babies can't help being born to horrid breeders - but we can do our best to give them the best lives, ever!!)
very well said Plum :)
 

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Yes, I've been there, done that with my first standard poodle I bought in 1993. I just knew I wanted a standard poodle and I wanted one "NOW" and I got one from a situation similar to yours. We loved him to death, but I knew a little more purchasing the poodles we have now . . .. and I know even more now for the future purchases.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
thanks everyone for the replies

i feel relieved in posting my true thoughts and reading your thoughful replies

:)
 

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I hear you. And I thought we did quite a bit of research as to generic puppy-buying, but not specific to poodles. I did fall victim to the "I want it now" thing when the breeder I fell in love with listed a litter on their website. It turned out it was for a friend and not from their on-site champion/show dogs. Now I, thanks to this site, find out she has a less than desirable kennel in her line and the actual breeder seems to only breed to breed and doesn't show, etc. (unlike the breeder I fell in love with and purhcased her from). I wanted her anyway. Sigh. Anyhow, I guess it happens.

2. Good Poodle breeders do not breed Brown to White/Cream.
Okay, I have to ask - why? What does a good breeder breed brown to?
 

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Okay, I have to ask - why? What does a good breeder breed brown to?
Because if you breed Brown to White/Cream it has the potential of putting liver pigment on the White/Cream puppies. This is a disqualifying fault.

Cream comes with a fading gene and many Brown breeders strive to produce dark brown Poodles who hold their color (this is the least of my concerns, but color means a lot to some people).

Brown should ideally be bred to Brown or Black. If at all possible, Cream should not be introduced.
 

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Because if you breed Brown to White/Cream it has the potential of putting liver pigment on the White/Cream puppies. This is a disqualifying fault.

Cream comes with a fading gene and many Brown breeders strive to produce dark brown Poodles who hold their color (this is the least of my concerns, but color means a lot to some people).

Brown should ideally be bred to Brown or Black. If at all possible, Cream should not be introduced.
And that is another strike against my dog's breeder...she bred brown to silver.
 

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I had a very similar experience. Flash was very cheap, and I just didn't know at the time that his breeder wasn't reputable. I didn't know what questions to ask.
So I do worry about his health, but I love him to death and I can't say I have any regrets. He's a very unique dog, and he was definitely meant for me. :)
but now I know how to get a great breeder next time! And I've already started a savings account, because I know it's gonna take me the next decade to save up the dough it'll cost for a well bred standard.
 

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Just a side note - I don't think there is anything wrong with giving your poodle pig ears...was the issue here because she was giving it to a puppy? Because I use Merrick pig ears and we LOVE them here. They aren't greasy, they are baked and huge. They take Wrigley three or four days to finish (whereas the typical ones would take twenty minutes). I've researched and found this to be a very good brand to use with dogs.
Oh, and I give my smaller dog - a chinese crested - the Merrick sow ears. A bit smaller but still dry not greasy.
 

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Casey has a nub of a tail as well and I don't like it and didn't even realize till I got him home.
I should have ran the other way when I saw him but had just driven 6 hours to get him
They were on way to vet and I followed to vet and left. Would I do it again probably not. Casey is a doll and your puppy will be to. Just do the best you can for him and learn for next time.

Caseys pics are up in the picture section with his nubby tail
 

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Just a side note - I don't think there is anything wrong with giving your poodle pig ears...was the issue here because she was giving it to a puppy? Because I use Merrick pig ears and we LOVE them here. They aren't greasy, they are baked and huge. They take Wrigley three or four days to finish (whereas the typical ones would take twenty minutes). I've researched and found this to be a very good brand to use with dogs.
Oh, and I give my smaller dog - a chinese crested - the Merrick sow ears. A bit smaller but still dry not greasy.
there is nothing wrong in giving pigs ears as treats to chew up, The issue was more that they said they gave the pups a crappy brand of kibble and pigs ears as their daily nutrition.... they have no way near the right nutrition for puppies!
 

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My three LOVE pigs ears - I just can't figure out why they're so darned expensive. Mine can eat one in just a couple of minutes - so it's an pretty expensive treat. LOL
 

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Any kind of treat like this is fine for most dogs provising they dont have stomach problems - Suri loves them and throws them up :(
 

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Don't feel bad. Hopefully others will learn from your experience. My greatest wish is that people will spend time researching before they buy and will learn what to look for in a breeder and a Poodle.

Warning signs about your "breeder" that others can learn from:

1. Short tails on puppies are a sign that the breeder does not know the breed standard.

2. Good Poodle breeders do not breed Brown to White/Cream.

3. Good breeders usually don't advertise in the newspaper.

4. Good breeders provide written proof of completed health testing. They don't just give a verbal "OK".

5. Good breeders do things with their dogs (show, obedience, agility, hunt, therapy) to prove that they are worth breeding. They don't just breed their dogs for the sake of breeding.

6. Unless they have Champion stud dogs, good breeders rarely have both mom and dad on premises. This is because the goal with breeding is to breed to a stud who is not only superior in quality, but one that will compliment and hopefully fix the faults in a breeding bitch. The chances that a breeder has that stud dog at home are slim. Most good breeders seek outside stud service.

7. While we are more than happy to answer your 50 million questions, :) a good breeder will be knowledgeable about Poodles and will be ready, willing and able to answer all of your questions as a new owner.
Great response!!

Everyone has had a learning experience of one sort or the other. No need to feel bad about it. You don't want it to affect how you see your sweet little boy. I'm sure you will love him to pieces no matter what. Even though the chicken nugget tail isn't standard, he looks so darned cute!
 
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