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This little girl, in the link below has somehow captured my heart in both her story, and her pictures. She has a spark in her eyes that a lot of dogs from her situation wouldn’t have. My heart is beating with exctement as I just sent the rescue an email. I had so much to say I ran out of room lol. I think adopting her would squelch my puppy fever, and I’d begin teaching another dog how to fit in my little family, and what real love is all about.

Please go look at her and her short story and tell me if I’m being foolish or not by wanting to adopt her now instead of waiting until after the first of the year to pursue a puppy.

Thanks!

https://www.petfinder.com/dog/leyla-45560655/fl/orlando/poodle-and-pooch-rescue-fl828/


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That’s my feeling too! I think, lol. It comes down to if they approve me. It says it might take a few days to get back to me. The waiting is/ will be, horrible!


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Awww, she looks so sweet. My thoughts are to get clarification on how they know she is good with other dogs because you have two of your own already. Is she currently living in a foster with other dogs? Or are they assuming she is good with other dogs because of the situation she came from when she had to be with other dogs? Do you get to meet her in a neutral place where she is comfortable before adopting her to see her personality, and do they require that you bring your other dogs to meet her?

One thing I will add is that when I was looking to rescue a dog, I was very picky as to where I looked because I already had pets in my life and this dog had to fit in. I chose an excellent rescue that fosters dogs and makes sure they are stable before posting their pictures and profiles for adoption. This also made sure the information they put in Miracle's profile was accurate, because her foster mom really knew her. I knew Miracle was good with other pets and had a submissive personality because she lived with 2 dogs and 2 cats in the foster home, and I got to see her interact with those animals before I made my decision. I would have been somewhat less cautious if I hadn't had other pets because the whole "fitting in with the pack" wouldn't have been an issue.
 

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I do know that Poodles and Pooches does not have a shelter, so all the dogs are housed in foster homes. From talking to them a few months ago, (right before I got Stella), they said that the dogs are homed with other animals. So if it says “great with other dogs” then they are in that current situation. You’ll notice it doesn’t say anything about cats, so my guess there are None in the home and they just don’t know.

Also. Stella wasn’t a good fit for Zeke when I first got her. She was way to active for him, she stole his balls and toys, and she ran too fast past him all the time. He only had to give her a couple of warnings to get her to be more cautious when near him. Now she is a much calmer dog and he doesn’t mind at all when she plays.


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What an adorable dog - just look at those expressive eyes. Looks like there is some work to do as she was rescued from a greeder, but am sure you are up to the task. Fingers crossed that you can give this lovely lady a home.
 

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So I’m a little upset. I was turned down for Leyla. I believe differently than most people about vaccinations.

I did research many, many years ago: way before there were holistic vets readily available. Many of the research papers I read suggested that vaccinations are not needed throughout a dog’s life. Once the puppy vaccines are given, and then the adult booster, then they are vaccinated for life.

One of the things I remember was them commenting on children’s vaccines. A child is vaccinated once against Polio, MMR and so on. There is just no need to keep repeating these vaccines.

I found that very interesting, and while I didn’t give up completely on vaccines, it just played in my head every time I went to do it. Not 2 years ago I took Zeke
And Dory to see a holistic vet. We did talk about this, and she agreed with what I’d found in research.

She does not vaccinate dogs after the adult booster has been done. If it has to be done for boarding purposes, flights etc, she only gives a very tiny dose of the vaccines to be able to say they were done.

Of course, this doesn’t include the rabies shot. I get that done every 3 years as required by law.

But that is why I got turned down. They don’t believe in holistic medicine for dogs.


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Sorry to hear, Jojo :( She looks really sweet. Rescues get to decide on their own stipulations. I looked at a rescue years ago that would only allow a person to adopt if the person agreed to feed the adopted dog a raw diet. This was not something I felt comfortable with doing, so I had to move along.

Breeders are kind of the same though, too, where they will state in a contract that if you do not follow their recommendations for vaccinations, whatever health guarantee that exists will no longer be honored (or they refuse the adoption). I think many of them are now following Dr. Dodds vaccination protocol.
 

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I’m really heartbroken. I don’t know what it was about her, but her sparkly eyes and expressive face just really drew me in. I actually wanted her more than getting my dream puppy. But I’m back on track for that. I’ve quit looking at rescue groups as it just breaks my heart. They all require annual vaccinations.


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So I’m a little upset. I was turned down for Leyla. I believe differently than most people about vaccinations.

I did research many, many years ago: way before there were holistic vets readily available. Many of the research papers I read suggested that vaccinations are not needed throughout a dog’s life. Once the puppy vaccines are given, and then the adult booster, then they are vaccinated for life.

One of the things I remember was them commenting on children’s vaccines. A child is vaccinated once against Polio, MMR and so on. There is just no need to keep repeating these vaccines.

I found that very interesting, and while I didn’t give up completely on vaccines, it just played in my head every time I went to do it. Not 2 years ago I took Zeke
And Dory to see a holistic vet. We did talk about this, and she agreed with what I’d found in research.

She does not vaccinate dogs after the adult booster has been done. If it has to be done for boarding purposes, flights etc, she only gives a very tiny dose of the vaccines to be able to say they were done.

Of course, this doesn’t include the rabies shot. I get that done every 3 years as required by law.

But that is why I got turned down. They don’t believe in holistic medicine for dogs.


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The statement you made about pediatric immunizations is not correct across the board. Some immunizations are single dose but most are multi-dose. For some immunizations adult titer testing will often reveal a significant enough loss of antibodies to warrant an adult booster. Here is a link to pediatric/adolescent immunization schedules from the CDC.


https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/hcp/imz/child-adolescent.html


And this is a link to the CDC's recommended immunization for person over age 18. If is noteworthy that this is not a list with just a flu shot. If that is all you have gotten then you may be at risk either of getting something like pneumococcal pneumonia, meningitis or perhaps worse transmitting something like pertussis to a child in your family.



https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/hcp/imz/adult.html#table-age


I know this does not directly relate to jojogal's situation of having been turned down to adopt the dog she applied for, but it is really important in human and animal health. This doesn't mean I advocate giving no immunizations and I am certainly not opposed to titering to avoid excessive doses, but maintaining herd immunity is one of the cornerstones of good public health practice. Vets I now who are more inclined to give regular boosters are generally of the mindset that if certain clients ask for titers but then fail to return for needed boosters they are risking the effectiveness of this strategy. One has to look no further than this years measles outbreak to see the outcomes of failure to maintain high enough levels of herd immunity in people. Fortunately no one died, but there were hospitalizations. If something like this happened in poultry or dairy cattle the results could be very disruptive to our food supplies and if in companion animals a major source of unneeded heartbreak and astronomical vet bills.
 

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I’m sorry you got turned down by this adoption agency.

Immunology is not my strength and I’m not up to date with the science, but I do know you can’t make a decision not to give adult vaccinations because you assume the dog has the proper levels of antibodies from puppy vaccinations. You need to titer the dog to assess whether or not it has sufficient antibodies. Each vaccine is different. Only if a titer shows your dog has appropriate level of antibodies should you decline a booster.
 

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Where I live we recently had an incident happen where a rescue dog (adopted, then brought in from another state) spread Parvo to other dogs in the community. This can happen anywhere. My dogs are vaccinated, but after hearing that story I changed my plans and refused to being them to a local dog event.
 

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That’s the thing about rescues, the rules are hard and fast and for good reason. Dogs and cats end up in shelters for the most part, because their original owners failed them. Failed to immunize, neuter, medicate, socialize, groom and love. Animals are altered before adoption, no matter the age, and they are just as firm about vaccinations. Until I joined PF, I had never heard of titering, or that you could even ask your vet not give all the vaccinations at once. My vet wanted to neuter Buck at 6 months and I would have gone along with that, had it not been for learning about growth plates here. My breeder was very insistent about Buck being fully immunized before he was anywhere near other dogs. He was a puppy and Parvo is a death threat here. That said, I think this can be appealed. Why couldn’t your vet assure the rescue that you are a committed, responsible owner, and outline the protocol for immunization goals. To some folks, “holistic” might not sound serious.
 

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I’m really heartbroken. I don’t know what it was about her, but her sparkly eyes and expressive face just really drew me in. I actually wanted her more than getting my dream puppy. But I’m back on track for that. I’ve quit looking at rescue groups as it just breaks my heart. They all require annual vaccinations.


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I'm so sorry about the outcome. You told the truth, that stands for a lot in my book. Best wishes in finding your dream puppy.
 

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I’m sorry you got turned down but unfortunately, most rescues or shelters will turn you down because of this conviction.

I personnally do not vaccinate my dogs once all the shots have been done. As long as vaccines for a 5-6 pound dog are given in the same dose as for a 200 pound St-Bernard, I won’t risk my dog’s health by vaccinating anymore than necessary.

I also believe immunity is acquired with the first sets of shots, plus, my dogs are house dogs, don’t go to day care and rarely meet other dogs.

In conclusion, I would have been turned down too !
 

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That’s the thing about rescues, the rules are hard and fast and for good reason. Dogs and cats end up in shelters for the most part, because their original owners failed them. Failed to immunize, neuter, medicate, socialize, groom and love. Animals are altered before adoption, no matter the age, and they are just as firm about vaccinations. Until I joined PF, I had never heard of titering, or that you could even ask your vet not give all the vaccinations at once. My vet wanted to neuter Buck at 6 months and I would have gone along with that, had it not been for learning about growth plates here. My breeder was very insistent about Buck being fully immunized before he was anywhere near other dogs. He was a puppy and Parvo is a death threat here. That said, I think this can be appealed. Why couldn’t your vet assure the rescue that you are a committed, responsible owner, and outline the protocol for immunization goals. To some folks, “holistic” might not sound serious.
 

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I don't know if you've tried nearby shelters, but if you submit applications even when they don't have a poodle or poodle-mix puppy or young adult, you'll be at the top of their list when/if one comes through. Also have you considered fostering one? If the shelter is crowded when they get one, they'll call you first.

The dog in the ad was 3 years old and still not housebroken; at that age it's pretty difficult in breaking bad habits. If you get a young one that presents as calm and friendly, he or she should be easier to housebreak and get along well with your other two.

IMHO please consider at bare minimum get the parvo and distemper shots (although these two usually come in a set of 4 or 5 critical vaccines). Homeopathic remedies won't cure those monster viruses, and one infected dog in your home would likely wipe out all of them.

Since Zeke and Stella are past the puppy stage, I'm not sure but they might only need one core vaccine with another due 3+ years later, rather than the three initial shots given to puppies at 8, 10, and 12 weeks of age. See Vaccine Schedules here.

Note: don't get all the shots and a rabies vaccination on the same day; the rabies should be given a month apart from the others. About two weeks ago my cat had his rabies booster and it's been pretty rough on him.
 

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I’m sorry you got turned down but unfortunately, most rescues or shelters will turn you down because of this conviction.

I personnally do not vaccinate my dogs once all the shots have been done. As long as vaccines for a 5-6 pound dog are given in the same dose as for a 200 pound St-Bernard, I won’t risk my dog’s health by vaccinating anymore than necessary.

I also believe immunity is acquired with the first sets of shots, plus, my dogs are house dogs, don’t go to day care and rarely meet other dogs.

In conclusion, I would have been turned down too !

The immunity acquired at a first dose provokes a short lived immunoglobulin called IgM. This IgM cannot protect puppies of nursing moms and really does usually decline significantly in weeks or months. For good sterilizing immunity to develop boosters provoke (and re-provoke) IgG which has a circulating half life measured in years to decades. It can cross the placenta and provide protective maternal immunity for puppies (and kittens).
 

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I don't know if you've tried nearby shelters, but if you submit applications even when they don't have a poodle or poodle-mix puppy or young adult, you'll be at the top of their list when/if one comes through. Also have you considered fostering one? If the shelter is crowded when they get one, they'll call you first.



The dog in the ad was 3 years old and still not housebroken; at that age it's pretty difficult in breaking bad habits. If you get a young one that presents as calm and friendly, he or she should be easier to housebreak and get along well with your other two.



IMHO please consider at bare minimum get the parvo and distemper shots (although these two usually come in a set of 4 or 5 critical vaccines). Homeopathic remedies won't cure those monster viruses, and one infected dog in your home would likely wipe out all of them.



Since Zeke and Stella are past the puppy stage, I'm not sure but they might only need one core vaccine with another due 3+ years later, rather than the three initial shots given to puppies at 8, 10, and 12 weeks of age. See Vaccine Schedules here.



Note: don't get all the shots and a rabies vaccination on the same day; the rabies should be given a month apart from the others. About two weeks ago my cat had his rabies booster and it's been pretty rough on him.


I put in an application for fostering, but that was turned down too. Sigh. There was just something about Leyla that super drew me to her. I have no doubt I should have had her. So I’m not looking at shelters for poodles. I’ll be getting my puppy next summer as planned.

Every time I have rescued, the dogs have come with a lot of baggage and weren’t good dogs for me in the beginning. But with lots of patience, loving and building up confidence, they all turned out awesome.


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