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So there's those people that come into the salon to get their dogs nails done every three months or so, I can hardly stand to go three WEEKS without getting my dogs nails grinded (I do it myself, she's an angel for it)

And of course, due to the neglect of these dogs nails, their quicks are really grown out, so you can't take much off the nails. When I'm doing these dogs nails I'll find myself wondering that if you cut all the nails to the length they SHOULD be, cutting the quick in the process, would it quickly make their quicks grow back to the length they're suppose to be at?

I've only been grooming for a year, so I don't know everything, and I myself would never do this to my animals because it would be painful and I'm good at keeping my dogs nails short. (I see white and bring her in, lol)
 

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Oh gosh I dread this if I ever groom other people's dogs. I'm bad about Harry's nails because they grow so quickly. His breeder said his sister's are like that too so it's just one of those things that might be genetic? I am teaching him to grind nails now after the last time I hit the quick and he bled like I cut a toe off. I don't want to cut anymore.
 

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With quick stop it stops the bleeding pretty fast normally (unless you cut it REALLY REALLY BAD)

I work at Petco, and one of the parakeets got it's toe bit off by a cage mate.. they used our quickstop to stop the poor babys bleeding too.
 

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I keep meaning to place an order with KVpet to buy those small things I need like quickstop. I don't cut now though but it's always good to have it on hand.
 

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Fluffy...please NEVER attempt to cut a dog's nails back to a much shorter length if they are very overgrown. This is a veterinary procedure, usually done while the dog is sedated. The dog is then put on antibiotics. It is a messy, bloody procedure and quite painful if the dog were to be conscious. It would create a lifetime of anxiety and fear around the nail trim.

As a groomer, you should only take the nail back as short as you can without it bleeding if possible. If you want nails to get shorter, the quick will naturally recede if the nail is grinded back to the quick on a weekly basis. You can't make on overgrown quick shorten on a dog that comes in less often than that. If clients complain that the nails are still too long, you must explain to them about the quick and that you trimmed the nails as short as possible without causing pain to their dog.
 

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I believe if they are very long you can have a vet cut them back and cauterize them to stop the bleeding. It is painful but I have heard of it being done in extreme cases.

I just cut the nail as far as I can and grind it back to the point where I see a tiny dot of blood and by the next visit they have receded. I am having to do this with my moms dog Jack.
 

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We had Harry's nails cut back when he was getting neutered. He did just fine but I wouldn't do that without him being under and I don't want him sedated for anything unless it's important. Grinding weekly does keep their nails short and the quick stays short too.
 

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So there's those people that come into the salon to get their dogs nails done every three months or so, I can hardly stand to go three WEEKS without getting my dogs nails grinded (I do it myself, she's an angel for it)

And of course, due to the neglect of these dogs nails, their quicks are really grown out, so you can't take much off the nails. When I'm doing these dogs nails I'll find myself wondering that if you cut all the nails to the length they SHOULD be, cutting the quick in the process, would it quickly make their quicks grow back to the length they're suppose to be at?

I've only been grooming for a year, so I don't know everything, and I myself would never do this to my animals because it would be painful and I'm good at keeping my dogs nails short. (I see white and bring her in, lol)
I hear you... but I have a question... one of our dobes came from a local rescue. Her nails were so long when we got her that I don't think they have ever been cut at all, with result her quicks are extremely long. How do you get those quicks to recede? I mean even cutting close to or grinding the nail to the quick as we've done since we got her has not helped in getting the quick shorter. I've kinda ran out of options, so we grind them every few days without any noticable results.
 

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I think the only option is sedating and having the vet do it. Does she need her teeth cleaned? Could do both at the same time.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Fluffy...please NEVER attempt to cut a dog's nails back to a much shorter length if they are very overgrown. This is a veterinary procedure, usually done while the dog is sedated. The dog is then put on antibiotics. It is a messy, bloody procedure and quite painful if the dog were to be conscious. It would create a lifetime of anxiety and fear around the nail trim.

As a groomer, you should only take the nail back as short as you can without it bleeding if possible. If you want nails to get shorter, the quick will naturally recede if the nail is grinded back to the quick on a weekly basis. You can't make on overgrown quick shorten on a dog that comes in less often than that. If clients complain that the nails are still too long, you must explain to them about the quick and that you trimmed the nails as short as possible without causing pain to their dog.
Oh I would never do it myself, I was just wondering if it was a possible procedure. It looks like, with some of the posts in here, that it is! And I do explain that to clients, some still don't understand that if we cut them too short and it bleeds.. it hurts the dog. Or when they come in with a dog with white nails that're all pink, they don't understand that we can't take them down anymore because they're already as short as they can go.
 

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I think if it needs to be done, it should be done by a vet. I believe I've heard that vets acually cauterize (I know I mispelled that) the nails instead of using styptic or silver nitrate. There is a difference between cutting the very tip of the quick on one or two nails (that happens to everyone) and intentionally cutting the quick further back on every nail.
 

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Yep, it's called doing a 'cutback' and we only do it under sedation. And we do cauterize the nails afterwards. It is bloody, messy and painful, they are tender for a few days afterwards.

Grinding helps the quick receed, so it's a good idea all around.
 

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I have to admit that this topic is making me feel queasy, but I have a question. What's the best thing to use to grind the nails? I've seen the ads for Peticure, but I don't know anyone personally who has used one.
 

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I use a dremel - I got a cordless one and it is fantastic. The guys get their nails done weekly. I can't even imagine waiting weeks and weeks between grinding. YUCK. I hate long nails!!
 

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I have a Pedipaw, and it is so annoying to use. It is incredibly slow, and really only works on Perry's nails like it should work.

I need to buy a dremel, but I'm afraid of going too far too fast and messing it all up... or grinding at a pad (I do this sometimes on accident with the pedipaw because I take off the guard because it is pointless.)

Any advice on dremels? I'm sure a lot of people would appreciate some guidance on the subject.
 

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I'll tell you that I'm still scared of my dremel but the thing I noticed is that when you use the sandpaper it doesn't really grind super fast so you have more control over it than you think. Dremels are super super loud so you might need to give your dog time to get used to the sound too. I still sweat a little when I use mine but hopefully over time I get used to it. Get one at WalMart.
 
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