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Mia's feeling a bit unwell. I think it's a pain in her rear right leg, as I noticed her walking stiffly last night and again this morning. Although she seemed sprightly when we woke up, she refused to go on our usual early morning walkabout, when we spot deer, opossums, and raccoons. If her Gabapentin wasn't enough to cover the pain, then I figured a quarter tab of Carprofen would help. The problem was that she had already situated herself in her favorite seat on the couch, the seat nearest the kitchen table, where she can lay her head comfortably on the armrest and stare directly at us while we eat, her head camouflaged among the pillows.

I fixed her breakfast then sat down to eat mine, when I turned and saw her sitting upright and staring pointedly at me. She seemed to be using all of her telepathic powers to convey to me that she and her bowl were in two different places, and it was my job to remedy this crime against pup-manity. Ever dutiful, I did. I brought the bowl to her, holding it just below the level of her muzzle and at what I believe would be a tantalizing angle were I a dog. Despite my efforts at presentation, she barely glanced downwards at its contents, so I took a single piece of kibble and rested it softly in my palm for her to pluck from my hand like a grape from the vine. Success! She ate the first bite. I grabbed another single piece of kibble, and again she ate. But I was impatient, and in the third attempt I tried to smuggle the Carprofen past her delicate palate. The impostor was discovered immediately, dropping from her mouth on to the couch like a watermelon seed. Defeated, I withdrew to the kitchen, where I enlisted my old friend, a Trojan horse named Peanut Butter. Encased in creamy goodness, the medicine was unrecognizable. Mia relished it.

My job all but done, I continued to feed her kibble, hurriedly now, grabbing a fistful at a time until the bowl was empty. What had started as an act of intimacy and care had degraded to a mere functionality. Although several bites remained, we both knew it was over.

And hopefully after a snooze, she'll awake with vim and vigor, ready for an abbreviated walk in the woods.
 

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Our secret weapon is chicken - only problem is Sophy and the cats think they should get "medicine" too, so I get through rather a lot of it!
 

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Javelin has had a sinus infection so is taking 10 days of doxycycline 1 1/2 pills 2X daily. American cheese has become my best friend this week with 1/2 slice hiding Javelin's pills and the other half to give Lily to keep her from eating his medicine. I am just over 5 days now, sliding down the back slope with him much improved.

The things we do for them...
 

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Hello Liz and Mia ,
If the girls need to take meds the most effective way to administer them (for me) is tilting their head back and tossing it down their throat. It’s scary to do but any other method they will just spit it out. Princess especially is quite adept at this
 

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Mia's feeling a bit unwell. I think it's a pain in her rear right leg, as I noticed her walking stiffly last night and again this morning. Although she seemed sprightly when we woke up, she refused to go on our usual early morning walkabout, when we spot deer, opossums, and raccoons. If her Gabapentin wasn't enough to cover the pain, then I figured a quarter tab of Carprofen would help. The problem was that she had already situated herself in her favorite seat on the couch, the seat nearest the kitchen table, where she can lay her head comfortably on the armrest and stare directly at us while we eat, her head camouflaged among the pillows.

I fixed her breakfast then sat down to eat mine, when I turned and saw her sitting upright and staring pointedly at me. She seemed to be using all of her telepathic powers to convey to me that she and her bowl were in two different places, and it was my job to remedy this crime against pup-manity. Ever dutiful, I did. I brought the bowl to her, holding it just below the level of her muzzle and at what I believe would be a tantalizing angle were I a dog. Despite my efforts at presentation, she barely glanced downwards at its contents, so I took a single piece of kibble and rested it softly in my palm for her to pluck from my hand like a grape from the vine. Success! She ate the first bite. I grabbed another single piece of kibble, and again she ate. But I was impatient, and in the third attempt I tried to smuggle the Carprofen past her delicate palate. The impostor was discovered immediately, dropping from her mouth on to the couch like a watermelon seed. Defeated, I withdrew to the kitchen, where I enlisted my old friend, a Trojan horse named Peanut Butter. Encased in creamy goodness, the medicine was unrecognizable. Mia relished it.

My job all but done, I continued to feed her kibble, hurriedly now, grabbing a fistful at a time until the bowl was empty. What had started as an act of intimacy and care had degraded to a mere functionality. Although several bites remained, we both knew it was over.

And hopefully after a snooze, she'll awake with vim and vigor, ready for an abbreviated walk in the woods.
Surely Mia's thinking 'Gee, Mom, you're there when I need you.'
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks, everyone. She's feeling better, and we enjoyed a short but energetic walk once the Carprofen kicked in. She's finishing breakfast now. I'll keep her relatively rested today and check on her leg this evening.
 
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