Poodle Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,314 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
As someone with allergies in their family, it really irritates me when I see breeders advertise their dogs (including poodles) as "hypoallergenic" or "non allergenic". The reality is there's no such thing as non allergenic dogs. There's low shedding dogs with hair instead of fur, but there's no guarantee that someone with a dog allergy will be ok with every dog that doesn't shed (much).

Anyone with allergies should be visiting with a few different breeders of the breed they're interested in to see how they react. And I think breeders should be responsible enough to educate potential puppy buyers on the reality of allergies, and what they should be considering before bringing a dog home. Nobody wants the pup to have to be returned because the new home was in fact allergic.

This rant came about because I was browsing the classifieds and was irritated at how many mixed breed byb's were touting the "hypoallergenic" properties of their dogs. However, I have also seen some "responsible" breeders tout this myth as well. Rant over!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,881 Posts
As someone with allergies in their family, it really irritates me when I see breeders advertise their dogs (including poodles) as "hypoallergenic" or "non allergenic". The reality is there's no such thing as non allergenic dogs. There's low shedding dogs with hair instead of fur, but there's no guarantee that someone with a dog allergy will be ok with every dog that doesn't shed (much).

Anyone with allergies should be visiting with a few different breeders of the breed they're interested in to see how they react. And I think breeders should be responsible enough to educate potential puppy buyers on the reality of allergies, and what they should be considering before bringing a dog home. Nobody wants the pup to have to be returned because the new home was in fact allergic.

This rant came about because I was browsing the classifieds and was irritated at how many mixed breed byb's were touting the "hypoallergenic" properties of their dogs. However, I have also seen some "responsible" breeders tout this myth as well. Rant over!

I have to agree with you on this rant! There is no such thing as total hypoallergenic. There are breeds (including the poodle, of course) that are low or very low in producing allergic reaction, but it is all dependent on the person's type and severity of allergies. I know that I have a very slight allergy reaction to dog hair/fur that is not worth even mentioning as it normally doesn't bother me.... BUT, grooming the dog is when it affects me. I groom my poodles about once a week and I can attest that after I am done, my eyes burn and are runny and my nose is stuffed up and burns, thus an allergic reaction to poodle hair. *Oopps... I wasn't supposed to tell potential buyers that, was I? :doh: :)*

I totally agree with you, anyone who is interested in a certain breed and is subject to allergies, even if the breed is "purported" to be non allergenic, they should visit the dogs and make sure they are not affected by them before they purchase said dog. Not only would it be terrible for the pup to have to be returned and rehomed... what about the person who just dumps the dog instead. A breeder should be sure the dog fits into the family!!

This is a very important subject you brought up!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,972 Posts
JMO, but I've never seen a good breeder "sell" their dogs. Meaning there is no sales pitch, no "hypoallergenic, great family pet, etc." They advertise titles and health, not gimmicks. To real Poodle lovers, they are so much more than a breed that might do well for people w/ allergies.

I belong to another general pet forum and someone is whining about "bargain shoppers." She tired of people calling her wanting her to drop her price. It's killing me not to tell that's what happens when your dogs are untested, untitled and you wait until the pups are 3 weeks old to find homes. It also bugs me that she timed the litter just in time for Christmas. No wonder I don't visit that forum very often.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,183 Posts
The term hypo-allergenic literally means slighly, or less than. Or having a decreased tendency to provoke an allergic reaction. So stating that they are hypo-allergenic is not false advertising. If someone said that they are non-allergenic, that would be an untruth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,481 Posts
It is wonderful that poodles have yet another bonus and that is they are excellent dogs for people with alergies because they are low/hypo.
Someone with alergies I would hope would not base getting a dog for that reason alone. The only full proof to that is meeting and spending time with the dog to determine if they can tolerate.

For a point of sale - I agree it should not be "headlined" because it can draw people that are not aware even though this is a benefit but not a guarantee.

I agree health testing is important to see but in addition I do want some attention on the pet aspect because some good pet buyers just want a good healthy dog that will thrive in their family yet are not interested in showing...also the only other thing is I want a history of why, when and the future.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,881 Posts
The term hypo-allergenic literally means slighly, or less than. Or having a decreased tendency to provoke an allergic reaction. So stating that they are hypo-allergenic is not false advertising. If someone said that they are non-allergenic, that would be an untruth.
Ahhhh, ok! I always took the term 'hypo allergenic" to mean they didn't cause allergies. Me bad!! :eek:hwell: Thanks for the correction on the term! :) So, good point to make.

So, a breeder can very properly say that poodles are hypo-allergenic..... but I think they should always make it known to potential buyers that some people can still have allergic reactions to them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,314 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
The term hypo-allergenic literally means slighly, or less than. Or having a decreased tendency to provoke an allergic reaction. So stating that they are hypo-allergenic is not false advertising. If someone said that they are non-allergenic, that would be an untruth.
I don't think there's any proof though that non or low shedding breeds are even hypoallergenic. So IMO breeders should not advertise them as such, because I don't think the average buyer understands the term. I know in my family my mom was badly allergic to our first PWD for the first 8 months, to the point that we almost returned him to the breeder. Then one day it was like a switch was flipped and she was better (not fine, she's still somewhat allergic to them).

http://www.pawnation.com/2009/09/11/the-myth-surrounding-hypoallergenic-dogs/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
why?

Hugh, I guess I didn't realise the true meaning of that word. I wonder how many people actually do. It has come to mean something else in most circles now I guess.

I am curious, because Im training Mercury as a therapy dog, WHY people can be less allergic to poodles than other breeds. Is it because they only shed in people amounts or are they lacking the typical doggy dander?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,972 Posts
Most people think "hypoallergenic" means non-allergenic, including the many of the DD breeders who use it as a sales pitch. I've often wondered if grooming isn't the real reason many breeds do better w/ allergy sufferers. If you look at the breeds recomended (Poodles, Bichon, Shnauzers, Maltese, etc.) they all require a lot more brushing and bathing which removes allergens. Compare that to a Lab or Rottweiler that will only be bathed a few times a year and it makes you think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,532 Posts
I have the same problem as jester's mom. No allergy problems most of the time but you can be sure I know about it when grooming day comes around. I'm sure it is from actually inhaling all the tiny bits that are being blown around and clipped of. But, I definitely have a reaction and I have tested as allergic to dogs.

I think it is OK to advertise that they are hypo-allergenic but that the breeder needs to be ethical in declaring that it doesn't mean that there is no possibility of an allergic reaction. Unhappy buyers = no buyers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,183 Posts
I have the same problem as jester's mom. No allergy problems most of the time but you can be sure I know about it when grooming day comes around. I'm sure it is from actually inhaling all the tiny bits that are being blown around and clipped of. But, I definitely have a reaction and I have tested as allergic to dogs.

I think it is OK to advertise that they are hypo-allergenic but that the breeder needs to be ethical in declaring that it doesn't mean that there is no possibility of an allergic reaction. Unhappy buyers = no buyers!
I agree. If someone called me and said their child had allergies and they wanted a puppy, I would explain all that to them and ask them to spend time with someone they know who has a Poodle or come here and bury their faces in the dogs backs and hang out for the day to see what will happen. BUT I think a huge majority of allergy sufferers will not have any problem being about Poo coat.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,956 Posts
Here's another thing to think about re: poodles and allergies... In my house I have multiple cats and two non-poodle dogs. Thankfully, no one who lives in my house is in the least bit allergic to animals, however my sister is highly allergic to cats. When she's been around Meau previously and Lucy recently, she's exhibited the same allergic reactions she has when she's around cats... We've concluded that since Lucy and Meau live with 4 cats, they've become imbued with the cat dander so they are no longer as hypo-allergenic as they may have been at one time.

I think if I ONLY had poodles and nothing but poodles, my sister MAY be able to withstand hanging out with the spoos, but as it stands now - she can only admire them from afar! Aaaaaaaa-CHOOOOOO! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,314 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I've often wondered if grooming isn't the real reason many breeds do better w/ allergy sufferers. If you look at the breeds recomended (Poodles, Bichon, Shnauzers, Maltese, etc.) they all require a lot more brushing and bathing which removes allergens. Compare that to a Lab or Rottweiler that will only be bathed a few times a year and it makes you think.
I think that's the theory that's out there. Also, it's possible that because the dogs don't shed hair out their coat keeps more of the dander etc in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,972 Posts
I think that's the theory that's out there. Also, it's possible that because the dogs don't shed hair out their coat keeps more of the dander etc in.
I was very allergic to cats when I was little (fortunately for me and my four feline babies, I've outgrown it). My mom was advised to bath our first cat on a regular basis and it really did help. We started w/ once a week and then slowly strechted it out.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top