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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I'd like to hear about anyone's experiences having both a poodle and a husky, and if they are generally a good match (individual personality's aside). I plan on getting a poodle puppy (standard), but my boyfriend would like to also get a husky puppy. I also have concerns about the husky doing well with the cat, but at the moment would like to know how huskies do as a companion dog for a poodle. I also wanted to get one puppy and wait ~ two years until they are trained and settled in before getting the second one, possibly more or less time depending on the individual dogs needs. But I am thinking it would be best to get the poodle first because 1, I would be heart broken if we got the husky first and it turned out he just wouldn't do well bringing another dog into the home, and 2, I was thinking a well-trained poodle would be a blessing to act as an example of good behaviors while we are still training the husky, but what are some thoughts on whether it would work fine getting the husky first? I realize this is a poodle forum and not a husky forum hahaa, but I'd love to hear about or see pictures of poodles with their non-poodle siblings :)
 

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Having raised our two older dogs together Lily (poodle) and Peeves (GSD) I think I can also speak for BF in saying never NEVER NEVER again for two puppies at once.

The other thing I have to say is I wish more people would really truly understand breed traits and needs more thoroughly before they set their hearts on a particular breed. Unless you can run a husky for hours a day to satisfy their deep need to pull something around be prepared to have them eat your furniture and your walls out of boredom and unspent energy. I do performance sports with my dogs and help out at trials for other sports than the ones I work at. I rarely see huskies. In addition to being driven by their sled pulling traits the few people I know who have them think they are stubborn as mules.

Poodles and GSD both need good handling and aren't necessarily easy because they are brainiacs, but if you know that going in they are both great breeds. There are maybe a couple of other breeds we would consider, but not nearly so seriously as the two breeds we have. In fact, never mind there are no other breeds I would care to have. I can't speak for BF on that.


The being heartbroken because the first dog wants/needs to be an only dog can happen no matter what kinds of dogs are involved. I also would not rely on a two year old poodle to be a model for a puppy. Standard poodles have long been circus dogs because they have overly well developed ideas of what is funny. They can always be clowns.
 

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In general it is not advisable to get two puppies of any breeds at the same time, as two puppies will bond with each other instead of bonding with people. If you do get two puppies, each one needs lots of individual time and training, and time playing with each other should be limited.

As far as breeds, huskies tend to be more aloof, independent dogs, so might be harder to bond with anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks so much for your detailed reply. It's funny you mention GSD's, because if we decided a husky would not be the right fit as a second dog, that was the other breed my boyfriend really wanted.
For sure getting two puppies at once is not an option hahaa, we would get them around 2 years apart.
I wanted a dog we could take camping/hiking/kayaking on the weekends, and do a couple ~3 mile runs with during the week (of course in addition to daily walks), and I thought a standard poodle would be a good fit for that level of activity. I do have concerns about being able to give a husky enough exercise, especially because I know they're not really the best fit for off-leash types of outdoor activities. Would you say the amount of exercise a GSD needs is more equivalent to that of a standard poodle?
 

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Also, I just want to note that I've volunteered at the local animal shelter and the local humane society for almost a decade now, and I've seen first hand how many huskies end up there, especially after game of thrones made huskies such a popular breed (they were all coming in with names like "ghost"). I swore I would never adopt a dog without fully understanding the difficulties involved in caring for that breed and committing to it, and in fact any time a friend mentions wanting a husky I tell them they should do thorough research before making a decision. All that to say that we will not decide to adopt any breed of dog without being sure we are capable of fully caring for their needs.
 

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In general it is not advisable to get two puppies of any breeds at the same time, as two puppies will bond with each other instead of bonding with people. If you do get two puppies, each one needs lots of individual time and training, and time playing with each other should be limited.

As far as breeds, huskies tend to be more aloof, independent dogs, so might be harder to bond with anyway.

reraven we made sure each pup trained separately with each of us and that each of us did things with the two of them together and their unsupervised puppy play time was limited. Even so it was exhausting. They have a bond to each other but their bonds to people are stronger, so the work was worth it.


OP I have found GSD and poodles (standards) to be a good match for each other generally. Our GSD is a pretty mellow dude and the poodles are both pretty high drive. It was partly seeing that the GSD has lost his desire to herd Lily around that made us decide it was a good time to add Javelin who is about 7 years younger than the other two. And BTW I am not the only PF member who has both of these breeds.
 

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My advice is to get the standard poodle first, wait three years, and by then your BF will want his own poodle. Huskies are escape artists, shed buckets of hair and are way down there on the canine IQ rankings. They are adorable as puppies, no doubt. I spent most of a day with a team of Huskies on a guided tour in Jackson Hole, WY. Before my sled ride, I was cuddling puppies at the base camp, totally in love. Afterwards, I was grateful for their work, but would never, ever want to own one.
 

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Mfmst smart poodle thinking there! We used to have a husky in our neighborhood. He was a notorious escape artist. There was a whole brigade of kids who would search for him on bicycles shouting to passersby about whether they had seen the dog. On the hair thing I can't get too worked up since we do have the special breed of German Shedder.
 

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Some dogs are worth the fur drifts:) More than a few friends of ours have GR’s and they would be a better match than a husky. You can’t go wrong with getting a poodle first - the bar will be set:)
 

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Oh boy, well I had a family member who was a Husky breeder. I've also trained several for clients who fell in love with the look. I love the breed but they are not for most people. I used to train, handle, & condition the breeder's Huskies & I had one of my own, she was my wages for the work I did plus we raised my pup's litter sister. My girl was exceptional & a good companion. But I was a kid & she was my dog. I did all her training from birth to death. Her sister was the typical Huskey, my girl was unique. I also had 81 acres to train her on with lots of hills, creeks, ponds, a lake. We had chores to do on the farm & I utilized the dogs to help pull pallets of feed sacks, sleds of supplies. We tracked & stalked game, hunted (for food), fished (also for food), dealt with predators. The dogs were also used to help do things like lift hay bales into the loft using a complicated pulley system. I was raised with some of the training & games the Native Americans used with their children so this wasn't so odd. I learned doing all of that using a team of Dobermans. So when I worked the Huskies, I adapted things to help them fulfill the need to pull, puuuuull, PULL! That's what makes them happiest.

Here's what happened. When I got my pup, I started training her & her sister. In that summer I lost so much weight people thought I either had an eating disorder or was gravely ill. Like people were going to my mother & getting her worried. A stretch of the legs for a lot of those dogs was 5 miles. Some of them did that 2 or 3 times per day. I literally spent my time on the fly. Took food with me & was eating several times a day just to have energy to keep up. Now the weight loss might sound cool except for one thing... either you got out & worked the dogs or bad bad things happened. So it's a different kind of commitment than it is even with a Border Collie. You can play mind games with a BC or fetch & keep him pretty sound. Not a Huskey, he doesn't give a fig about your games, he cares about the run.

Don't get me wrong, not all Huskies live that way. But a lot of Huskies end up in the pound, put down, or breed rescue because their humans weren't willing to go the distance the dog for what it was bred for). We did our best to keep those dogs healthy & happy. It was a JOB. I feel bad for the clients who bring me their huskies & I know it's never going to be a win-win for dog & human. The elderly people who brought me their Husky pups often made me want to cry. There are breeds that you can live with who are far more easy to live with that you can do all the things you might want to do with a husky.
 

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Dogsavvy, I wish I had your post for friends of ours, before they acquired a Husky. I couldn’t imagine a worse pairing, a couple in their mid-sixties with dachshund experience and they didn’t do much with the dachshund. Potential breed owners need to factor what the dog was breed to do and how it can slot into their lifestyle, or if it is a complete mismatch.
 

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As a trainer, on the rare occasion where I have been asked to help select a breed of dog for a client, I've never recommended the Huskey. I get a lot of folks who want to start getting fitter. I ask the very unpopular question, "Are you currently exercising?" 9 times out of 10 the answer is no. They think when they get the dog that this will motivate them to start... well, it doesn't. Sad but true. I always tell people to narrow their field of various dog breedS (note that is multiple) based on what their current activity level is. Unless they are a total couch potato & looking at Bulldogs or Pekinese, they will probably be happier in the long run.

Another thing to consider for young couples if there is any chance of children (having them, adopting them, fostering them) please take careful consideration of what your time commitment will be after the kid(s) arrive vs what it is now. Dogs are a hopefully 12+ year commitment. We realize this going into it but often times don't realize how much a child changes your priorities. Especially when you're sleep deprived because baby has day & night mixed up & 3 a.m. feedings, then the Huskey decides to turn your home into a racetrack because he hasn't had his 5 mile run.
 

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As a trainer, on the rare occasion where I have been asked to help select a breed of dog for a client, I've never recommended the Huskey. I get a lot of folks who want to start getting fitter. I ask the very unpopular question, "Are you currently exercising?" 9 times out of 10 the answer is no. They think when they get the dog that this will motivate them to start... well, it doesn't. Sad but true. I always tell people to narrow their field of various dog breedS (note that is multiple) based on what their current activity level is. Unless they are a total couch potato & looking at Bulldogs or Pekinese, they will probably be happier in the long run.

Another thing to consider for young couples if there is any chance of children (having them, adopting them, fostering them) please take careful consideration of what your time commitment will be after the kid(s) arrive vs what it is now. Dogs are a hopefully 12+ year commitment. We realize this going into it but often times don't realize how much a child changes your priorities. Especially when you're sleep deprived because baby has day & night mixed up & 3 a.m. feedings, then the Huskey decides to turn your home into a racetrack because he hasn't had his 5 mile run.
I have a family member who got a husky mix from a rescue and about 3 months after having a baby, the dog went back to the rescue (they had the dog maybe 2 years). It was an older dog with health and behavioral problems, and he wasn't a good fit for being around a baby. So I also hope people take into consideration that if they end up with a large dog with behavioral problems and they want to have kids, in the end the dog will probably need to be re-homed. Definitely not fair to the dog.
 

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Poodles and husky are very different. Look at a group of poodles when they go to sleep. They will be very close, even on top of one another sometimes. Look at huskies. They will be farther apart and you will not see any cuddling. Not 100% of course, just to give you an idea. A poodle is a companion dog. A husky is a working dog, not a companion. Once a poodle learns what you want, he will do it. A husky will do as you ask if he feels like it.

Not all huskies turn your home into a race track. My neighbor's was very quite and preferred to be alone. No running around the house. But, if she was ever loose she was GONE. No recall. None. Same with two client dogs.

Some people do very well with a husky, but I would have to say that a poodle person is not a husky person and vice versa. Huskies are very easy because they are fine hanging out by themselves. A husky is real good for a person who is not going to spend much time with their dog, other than skijoring or sledding.

Boyfriend probably likes the look of the husky. I would suggest finding a dog with that look but a more poodle personality. Does he think a poodle is a sissy dog? They guarded the kings of France.
 

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As a trainer, on the rare occasion where I have been asked to help select a breed of dog for a client, I've never recommended the Huskey. I get a lot of folks who want to start getting fitter. I ask the very unpopular question, "Are you currently exercising?" 9 times out of 10 the answer is no. They think when they get the dog that this will motivate them to start... well, it doesn't. Sad but true. I always tell people to narrow their field of various dog breedS (note that is multiple) based on what their current activity level is. Unless they are a total couch potato & looking at Bulldogs or Pekinese, they will probably be happier in the long run.

Another thing to consider for young couples if there is any chance of children (having them, adopting them, fostering them) please take careful consideration of what your time commitment will be after the kid(s) arrive vs what it is now. Dogs are a hopefully 12+ year commitment. We realize this going into it but often times don't realize how much a child changes your priorities. Especially when you're sleep deprived because baby has day & night mixed up & 3 a.m. feedings, then the Huskey decides to turn your home into a racetrack because he hasn't had his 5 mile run.

Also from the perspective of a trainer I wish more people would ask for advise in advance of selecting a dog, whether a pup from a breeder, or a pup or older dog from a shelter or rescue. I have been working with a 78 year old woman and her son with a dog the mom selected, a mastiff mix, now about 75 pounds. She has a couple of serious chronic health issues and can't physically handle the dog now. I think with a little prompting from me they have decided the son will take the dog with him when he returns to Florida for the winter. She wants another smaller dog. I hope they will take me with them when they go to find her a new dog so I can help them make a good choice.
 

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I cannot count the number of people I have warned about huskies. They are such cute puppies, but the adults just want to run and run and run and . . .


I agree with Catherine that far too many people get a cute puppy without ever finding out what that breed is all about. There are many breeds that I admire but would never, ever consider having.
 
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