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Panty girdles - horrors! And liberty bodices...! Hurrah for comfy shoes and elasticated waist bands say I!
 

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I recall as a child being made to wear "nice" clothes on the airplane. A few years ago, I was flying regularly to a construction site. I had been visiting my mom beforehand, and was just about to leave to drive a few hours to the airport. She took one look at me and ordered me to go and change. Apparently beat up composite toed work boots (metal free, so dont beep), worn jeans, an old tshirt, and a long sleeve plaid mens flannel shirt were not her idea of appropriate travelling attire for a business trip :p

I am pretty sure she insisted on earnings and lipstick too, which made me laugh (and which I removed when I got to the airport). Wish I had put the boots back on too, my feet always swell on planes and running shoes are very uncomfortable.
 

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Couldn’t view that link, Peggy. Sorry, Buddy, hope it’s a mild case. If there is even the hint that Buck needs to wear a mask, because dogs are vectors, he will wear one. He already wears a snood for his raw, so no biggie:)
 

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Couldn’t view that link, Peggy. Sorry, Buddy, hope it’s a mild case. If there is even the hint that Buck needs to wear a mask, because dogs are vectors, he will wear one. He already wears a snood for his raw, so no biggie:)
Hmmm. That's odd. Maybe you have to subscribe? The National Geographic newsletter has been keeping me sane. It's a bright spot in my daily email.

As for Buddy....

"In mid-April, right before his seventh birthday, Buddy began struggling to breathe. Six weeks later, he became the first dog in the United States to be confirmed positive for SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. On July 11, Buddy died."

:(

He may also have had lymphoma, so much about his condition and cause of death is still unknown.
 

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One cat has been confirmed in the UK - recovered fully after a week or two. If poor Buddy had lymphoma that seems the more likely cause of death, especially after 6 weeks of symptoms.

I wonder how widespread testing of animals has been? Given the shortage of reagent and the complexity of vet visits, I suspect it has not been a priority. The UK cat caught the virus from her humans, and the vets were careful to emphasise there was no evidence that domestic animals can give it to humans.
 

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Couldn’t view that link, Peggy... hope it’s a mild case...
Try using another browser.

"Buddy, The First Dog to Test Positive of Covid-19 in the US, has Died"
by National Geographic

Thank you Peggy. Incredible story, and the first of it's kind that I've read that had so much detail. Excerpts:

...When Buddy, who’d never been sick, developed thick mucus in his nose and started breathing heavily in April, no one except [the owner, Mr. Mahoney] believed the dog might have COVID-19. Mahoney himself had been suffering through the virus for three weeks—he was weak, had a scratchy throat, and had lost his sense of taste... "“Without a shadow of a doubt, I thought [Buddy] was positive” too, he says.

The first vet was skeptical and wouldn't allow the owner who had C19 bring him into the office, prescribed antibiotics over the phone.

The next week, Buddy was still struggling to breathe and had lost his appetite, so the Mahoneys’ 13-year-old daughter...who had tested negative, was permitted to bring the dog into the office.

From April 21 to May 15, Buddy continued to lose weight. He became increasingly lethargic. The Mahoneys took him to three different veterinarians on Staten Island, none of whom thought the coronavirus was likely. He got an ultrasound and X-rays, which indicated an enlarged spleen and liver, and he saw a cardiologist, who detected a heart murmur. Buddy spent two and a half weeks on antibiotics and two heart medications, and he was subsequently put on steroids. At this point, Mahoney says, Buddy’s doctors were still doubtful he had the coronavirus, and they had not yet identified lymphoma as a probable cause of his illness.


I read this and wondered why did the first two vets missed the diagnosis of lymphoma? Wouldn't the blood and urine tests given a hint? One of the signs is "Dogs with mediastinal lymphoma typically have difficulty breathing." The Mahoney's must have paid a fortune in vet bills.

It was at the third veterinary clinic, Bay Street Animal Hospital, where Mahoney was finally able to have Buddy tested for COVID-19. That was on May 15, one month after Buddy’s breathing trouble began.

A few days later, the clinic called. Buddy’s test results were in: He was positive. Mahoney was told to bring both the family’s dogs to the clinic immediately because health officials needed to confirm Buddy’s results and test Duke, their puppy. When Mahoney arrived at the clinic with the dogs on May 20, he says that “they came greeting me looking like space martians with hazmat suits.”

“For us it was a shock factor for a moment there...how do we protect our staff?” says Robert Cohen, veterinarian at Bay Street who treated Buddy, because little is known about infected dogs’ ability to transfer the virus to other dogs or humans. “We were well-PPE’d"... On June 2, the New York City Department of Health called Mahoney to tell him that Buddy had indeed contracted the virus.


Their puppy, btw, was negative. Buddy got to the point where he no longer tested positive for Covid but was having multi system organ failure. "He soon started urinating uncontrollably and had blood in his urine. Later that month, his breathing became so labored that it sounded “like a freight train,” Mrs. Mahoney says. In early July, Buddy began to have trouble walking."

Cohen, the veterinarian at Bay Street Animal Clinic, said that his team’s focus was on treating Buddy’s symptoms. “We know that we had a very sick patient,” he says, adding that the clinic was only “peripherally involved in the [SARS-CoV-2] case in a lot of ways.”

He says he had three or four conversations with the New York City Health Department and the USDA about Buddy and whether COVID-19 could be related to any of his health problems. “We had zero knowledge or experience with the scientific basis of COVID in dogs,” he says. Even with all the experts on one call, he says, “there was a lot of silence on the phone. I don’t think anybody knew. I really don’t think anybody knew at that point.”


Buddy was so ill by July 11 that he had to be euthanized and was cremated.


On the day Buddy was euthanized, the vet told Robert that new blood work results indicated that he almost certainly had lymphoma, which could explain many of his symptoms.The Mahoneys say they’re confident the team at Bay Street did their best for Buddy. They acknowledge that these are uncharted waters for everyone...

Dr. Cohen, says he personally relates to the Mahoneys’ confusion and heartbreak because his father died of COVID-19 two weeks ago in a Florida nursing home at age 94. “I was unable to see him. And I could say exactly the same criticisms [as the Mahoneys] about how his case was handled—the people didn’t act fast enough,” he says. But like the Mahoneys, he acknowledges that “everyone has good intentions,” grappling with the challenges of treating a horrific, widespread, and little-understood disease..."



Wow. What a story. I'm adding this part for the links:

Besides the published research on cats and dogs in labs, scientists also have access to the USDA’s public database of every positive animal case in the U.S., with only basic information. The World Organization of Animal Health maintains a similar database of global cases. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has an extensive toolkit on its website that includes a regularly updated list of known symptoms in animals, but more specific case data is not currently available to the public or the broader research community.

Twelve dogs and at least 10 cats have tested positive in the U.S. Lennon says few case details have been made available to researchers. “What are their signs? How long did they present? What are the blood work changes?” Lennon asks. (Researchers are scrambling to understand which animals the novel coronavirus—which is believed to have originated in bats—can infect.)

Experts involved in these cases will likely publish the details in scientific journals in the next six to 12 months, she says, but while publication of the scientific research on COVID-19 in humans has generally been fast-tracked, “on the vet side of things, we haven’t seen that acceleration yet.”
 

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I'm wondering after reading the story if the 7 year old German Sheppard, Buddy, had the lymphoma rapidly progress due to Covid leaving him too weak for his immune system to keep it in check. In vulnerable mostly elderly people in particular, Covid in this dog compromised other systems in his body.

Of interest to me is that Buddy caught Covid from his owner. I'll guess the owner cuddled a lot with him while recovering from Covid and transmitted it to him, and Buddy's first signs three weeks later was difficulty breathing. Their puppy did not test positive, which is extremely encouraging. There are also very few recorded cases of dogs with Covid, also encouraged.

Kudos also to the Bay Street vet, Dr. Cohen, who lost his own father to Covid.

It's all so terribly sad as I step back and feel the a sliver of the pain so many people are going through and the uncertainty. Stay safe.
 

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That's a heartbreaking story, PTP. As someone with an older dog, it's a sobering reminder that there's a lot we don't know about Covid and not to take for granted the research that says dogs don't get infected. Thank you for sharing.
 

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Robin, I was in the same boat! My family wanted to fly out for a beach week in September, and I had to firmly say no. Of course, I'm the spoil sport, but my parents (thankfully) followed my lead a few days later. It's not worth the risk! Just ask Herman Cain's family.
 

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Robin, I was in the same boat! My family wanted to fly out for a beach week in September, and I had to firmly say no. Of course, I'm the spoil sport, but my parents (thankfully) followed my lead a few days later. It's not worth the risk! Just ask Herman Cain's family.
It boggles the mind, truly. My sister was like, "Is it really that bad there?"

She wants us to book something for Christmas and says we can always cancel if necessary. But I'm still riding the high of getting our cruise refunded! I was sure we'd lose more than we did. I'm not taking that chance again. No way.

I don't think she even understands we'd have to quarantine 14 days after crossing the Canadian border. And this is an adult—an intelligent, kind woman. She's just completely cut herself off from any reliable sources of daily news.
 

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I have it drummed into me weekly that three things seem to be filling our COVID unit.

people who went on vacation (esp. to Florida)
those who attended gatherings
and the poor who live in crowded conditions and who are not protected at work.

I speak as one who has to practically get permission from her RN daughter to leave the house. Seriously, she may never let us get our hair cut again!
 

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You’re gorgeous even with Corona hair! I really, really need a haircut, but the community spread is too bad here to risk such a close encounter. I might reconsider if it it could be done outside when our steep curve goes down a lot.
 

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Sadly, this report, claiming that Kushner shied away from a national strategy on Covid because he believed that Dem states and cities would be hit hardest and the Repubs could pass the buck on to the Dem governors, is credible.
 

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Sadly, this report, claiming that Kushner shied away from a national strategy on Covid because he believed that Dem states and cities would be hit hardest and the Repubs could pass the buck on to the Dem governors, is credible.
Ouch.

Extremely consistent with current leadership's "Only take responsibility for the good stuff" approach, and yet so painful to see it resulting in the loss of real human life (and quality of life).

I'm surprised some states haven't closed their borders, like we've seen at the provincial level in Canada. Is that even something they can do?
 

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I'm surprised some states haven't closed their borders, like we've seen at the provincial level in Canada. Is that even something they can do?
There's some disagreement about it, but the general opinion is no. They can do other stuff, like impose emergency stay at home orders that amount to the same thing, but they can't just put up a road block on I-90 to exclude people with Illinois plates.
 

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There's some disagreement about it, but the general opinion is no. They can do other stuff, like impose emergency stay at home orders that amount to the same thing, but they can't just put up a road block on I-90 to exclude people with Illinois plates.
Washington is under an "essential travel only" order, but......
 
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