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Gotta agree with the part about staying out of public lavatories for sure! And I am really feeling proud of my prescient view of the world when I ordered N95 masks with extra replacement filters in early February thinking BF and I would both be working in public (not thinking about lines to get into and through supermarkets or finishing transactions with the pizza or sushi delivery folks).
 

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The Knox County Health Department has banned the medical reporter from the Knox News from attending press conferences because he keeps asking how they compute their figures.

They are currently reporting no COVID hospitalizations in Knox County.

Today UT-Med has 3. For some reason, they just don't count.
 

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The Knox County Health Department has banned the medical reporter from the Knox News from attending press conferences because he keeps asking how they compute their figures. They are currently reporting no COVID hospitalizations in Knox County. Today UT-Med has 3. For some reason, they just don't count.
I found a link to the article you're referring to, here. Excerpts:

"Gabrielle [the reporter] said the county's presentation on its website showing its success meeting benchmarks without saying what the targets are is akin to a teacher giving a student an A without saying which work was actually evaluated.

Here are some of the questions Gabrielle has posed to the health department:

  • Based on data made available by your department, it appears Knox County has not been hit as hard as other places. That would point to a success story that Knox County should be trumpeting, but it’s impossible to do that without knowing all the underlying data. Does the health department intend to tell that full story, undergirded by data, and if so, when and how?
  • You have said that you rely on multiple models when making decisions about Knox County, but you have not specified which models you are using. Please list the models you are using when making decisions about Knox County.
  • Do these models calculate our effective transmission number? If so, please tell us what the effective transmission (R) is.
  • You’ve said in multiple news conferences that you’ll base decisions on “data” but you have not provided specific metrics or benchmarks you use to make decisions. What specific data, metrics and benchmarks will trigger a change in policy? If you are declining to provide those benchmarks, please explain why.
  • You have said you’re tracking COVID-like illness and clinical presentation of COVID. When are you going to make that information public?
  • What are the raw case numbers, the incidence and prevalence of COVID-like illness in the county?
  • The state and federal government have been tracking COVID-like illness in emergency rooms since at least February using the syndromic surveillance network. That’s also part of the county-level pandemic plan. Have you been tracking COVID-like illness using this system? If not, why not?
  • The scientific process is constantly evolving, and includes uncertainty. What are some to the limitations of the information you’re using and how are you accounting for it in your decision-making?
Well they didn't like his questions. They pulled this card:

"Donila [the County Spokesman] told Knox News late Friday he made the decision to bar Gabrielle because of "unprofessional behavior directed toward the Health Department and his inaccurate reporting that has been constantly riddled with half-truths, missing facts and and a constant false narrative."

He went on to point out that Christopher was allowed in at the end of the media briefing to ask questions.

"Invitations to these calls are courtesies provided by Knox County and not mandated by law," Donila said.

Christopher said he stands by Gabrielle's professional conduct and reporting, which also relies on interviews and assessments by some of the nation's top epidemiologists, crisis communicators and science professors."



My take: The trickle down effect of ignorance has become a tsunami this year.

As of an hour ago, there were 88,447 US recorded deaths. See link.
One month ago on April 15, there were 33,284 deaths.
My earliest chart is from March 19, when there were 157 deaths.

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But it's not really ignorance, is it? What has been going on are decisions to sacrifice the old (usually 60+ years old) and the vulnerable with health conditions so society can get on with life as it used to be. I understand the need for people and businesses to not go under financially.

I'm not sure if this is true, but I read decades ago that Eskimos used to put you on an ice floe and push you out to sea when you couldn't keep up, i.e. the badly injured, sick, and the elderly. Truth or fiction, this is clearly the direction many of our policy makers have chosen.

I do believe that COVID-19 is as infectious as the common cold and isn't going away. We may get a vaccine that works, and we might not. Many of our "policy makers" are up in age themselves, and in a year I think a lot of them will be gone and their deaths will be included in the stats on those charts. Quite possibly mine too even if I'm careful. In their arrogance they don't seem to imagine this will affect them.

I just wonder what the world will look like with a younger population again, where fewer people make it to their 60s and even 50s. Will it be a better world with the old guard gone, and fresher, younger minds can pave the way for humanity to stop polluting the environment? And to implement universal healthcare? To fund fewer wars? Or will they carry on with the same way of thinking that has slowed down progress in science and humane policies that has plagued humanity for centuries?

I am sad that so many of us have gone and will go well into 2021 until (or if) everyone has a vaccine. It will be a different world, I hope we'll be around to see it.
 

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There are particular challenges to creating a vaccine for a corona virus, this link explains it well. At best, the vaccine is probably a year out. It’s also possible they may not be able to develop an effective, safe vaccine. I hate to sound like a Debbie Downer, but I think we need to be realistic.

I’m watching the dog sports community preparing to open trials back up with all sorts of precautions. Those precautions reduce the risk, but they don’t make it safe. I plan to pass on them until more is known about this disease. Beyond my personal risk, it’s also a public health concern.

Hopefully we will soon understand how to treat this better, and as time goes on, we will develop some herd immunity.
 

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Carolinek I think it is better to be realistic than to be looking at this situation with rose colored glasses. I am fully prepared for the idea that my life as it currently is is how it will remain perhaps for another full year with some adjustments in different locales back and forth as things get better then worse then better...

As to dog sports I have been wearing a mask as has my prvate trainer to show that picture to the poodles. Lily really doesn't seem to care much and Javelin thought it was odd at first but now has no care either. I could see doing local trials wearing a mask. What is really proving to be hard for me is the break in the flow of getting the rally master points for Lily to finish the champion titles. My plans would have had me needing hotel nights in early June and mid July. I really don't see wanting to sleep where someone unknown to me slept, showered, etc. the day before I got there. I am wondering if we will ever get to finish. We had 2 trials cancel in early April and we are missing three this month, four in June and three in July. Those could have been enough to finish since she was doing really well. She will turn 12 in early September, the clock is ticking.
 

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There are particular challenges to creating a vaccine for a corona virus, this link explains it well. At best, the vaccine is probably a year out. It’s also possible they may not be able to develop an effective, safe vaccine. I hate to sound like a Debbie Downer, but I think we need to be realistic.

I’m watching the dog sports community preparing to open trials back up with all sorts of precautions. Those precautions reduce the risk, but they don’t make it safe. I plan to pass on them until more is known about this disease. Beyond my personal risk, it’s also a public health concern.

Hopefully we will soon understand how to treat this better, and as time goes on, we will develop some herd immunity.
Good article. The only corona virus vaccine I know of that has actually hit the market is the one for FIP in cats. My vet won't give it because she doesn't think it works well enough to justify the possible side effects.

I am so very glad that this virus, as contagious as it is, has low mortality compared to what we might have been facing. The actual fatality rate is under 5%. HIV and rabies are close to 100%. Depending on whose figures to believe, smallpox was around 30%, Ebola 50%, SARS and TB both around 15%, MERS 35%. People, even in at risk groups, do recover. Prince Charles, at age 71, did not end up on a respirator. My family friend who picked up covid while undergoing chemo also recovered without a respirator.

At some level I understand where the open America protesters are coming from. I grew up watching my rust belt town wither until I finally grew old enough to join the exodus to the coast. (A story from a childhood friend. One of her dad's co-workers slipped and fell into molten steel. The plant poured a human weight ingot from that lot so the family could have a funeral; there was no way to recover an actual body.) I'm lucky enough to have landed in a comfortable little bubble of relative affluence. Covid isolation means I traded my horrible commute for working in slippers and flannel shirts with a cat sleeping on my feet. I'm doing ok. I would probably feel a heck of a lot different if I was part of a different demographic group.

I imagine how I would think if my normal life included friends and family dying of opiate overdoses, industrial accidents, crack violence, ridiculous loan debt, unaffordable insurance, lead in my drinking water, pollution induced asthma, black lung & silicosis, or any of the myriad other issues confronting lower and middle income America. Based on that picture, covid would be just one more crappy thing that happens to a some people I know. Probably not even as dangerous as staying home with an angry drunk unemployed husband. My reaction to the shutdown would be to tell to pull on your big girl britches and stop making the situation worse. Nobody on the coast has cared about my problems for the past 25 years. Excuse me while I play the worlds tiniest violin for New York and Boston.
 

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Poodle photo op. WSJ article The article is about UCSF professor Bob Wachter and his efforts to promote good Covid info on social media. The photo shows him with his mini poodle assisting the efforts squeezed into the same chair
 

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Well, I want to hear the answers to Gabrielle’s questions to the Knox County Department of Health! Safe distancing, gloves, sanitizing and masks are our only defense at this point. And the facts. It’s not the flu and it may not have the kill rate of Ebola, but the deaths are mounting. Senior centers, meat packing plants, cruise liners are obvious hot spots as are big dense cities. I am so ashamed that Doctors Without Borders has arrived to help the Navajo Tribe. We are going to be judged by what happens with our choices. Wear the damn mask, reconfigure the plant, telework. Hug your poodle!
 

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Americans should be working together, not being set against each other. Some of us have to earn money in order to live. Others have to isolate in order to live. Pity those who have to do both.

We all need reliable facts, not spin placed by politicians of either party to further their own ends. Each family has to make their own decisions and we're doing it in the dark.
 

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It’s a trying time for everyone, in different ways. Many of those with jobs are putting their health at risk, and those who are unemployed have that burden. Then we have some unemployed folks who are making more now with the government subsidies than they were before. No equity, but I guess that’s life.

I also am frustrated with not being able to compete in agility with my senior girls, who I was hoping to move up to the master level before they retire. I was also ready to premiere the youngster (Gracie) and that’s on hold too of course. Certainly first world problems, but it’s frustrating.

I worry about my grown kids- varying ways they’ve been affected.

Both my daughter and her husband are out of work, both work in industries that shut down. My daughter is self employed so no unemployment. We paid their mortgage last month and make it a point to drop off groceries and little things to boost spirits. They’ve been hit very hard economically and we’ll help where we can.

My youngest son and his wife retained their jobs but he works in healthcare and many of his patients and colleagues have tested positive and been sick- no fatalities yet. He and his family are healthy so far.

My oldest son and his wife are working from home, and safe, but he has an underlying health issue and lives in an area where there isn’t great compliance with the recommendations.

I just pray we all get out of this with as little scars as possible. This pandemic has its tentacles in all areas of our lives.
 

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The local paper reports that 57 of 300 employees at a Monterey mushroom facility in the next county have tested positive for COVID. Most are asystematic. It would be my guess that most of them are Hispanic, so I wonder about their healthcare options.

btw, occasionally (thankfully not often) when the wind blows just right, we get major mushroom smell from the growing medium (being tactful). I have not willingly eaten a mushroom since the first time it happened. Never again....

It's good to know that many people aren't bothered by the virus; upsetting to know that asystematic people are spreading it.
 

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A mushroom facility, how interesting! I don’t have a sense of smell, and love mushrooms so that proximity would be ok with me.
The more testing we do, the better we understand the true fatality rate. Dianaleez, I wonder if some of those workers are undocumented.
 

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The local paper reports that 57 of 300 employees at a Monterey mushroom facility in the next county have tested positive for COVID. Most are asystematic. It would be my guess that most of them are Hispanic, so I wonder about their healthcare options.

btw, occasionally (thankfully not often) when the wind blows just right, we get major mushroom smell from the growing medium (being tactful). I have not willingly eaten a mushroom since the first time it happened. Never again....

It's good to know that many people aren't bothered by the virus; upsetting to know that asystematic people are spreading it.
This info makes me thankful I wash all fruits and vegetables - including mushrooms, though this doesn't override the growing medium - in a soap-type wash. It's not geared to fruits and vegetables, but rinses beautifully and hopefully helps keep us a bit safer.

Thankful not to be in sinus range, friend. I've been in others, and peeeeyoooo.
 

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Zero,, I've missed zero hours of work since this BS started and the sun is my friend, fear my enemy. An outdoor dog prevails this time around with 4 of the top 5 symptoms at one time and if you don't want to get it don't get tested. The chicken pocks and the mumps are going to get you!!!
 

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So I recently had a huge scare and wanted to share a bit of it from being in the hospital.

Last month, about 5 weeks ago I started not feeling well, with some breathing problems. My dr and I spoke, and she began advising me on what to do and to watch for. She was convinced it wasn’t COVID-19 so did not test me. FF to about 10 days ago: it was getting harder to breathe, my oxygen levels kept dropping, and instead of being on oxygen only overnight while I slept, I was now using it 24 hours a day. So about 3 days later my dr ordered a stat ct scan of the chest. I had the test at 3:30 and at 4:25 got the call to go to the hospital. By the time I got here my o2 sats were in the 70’s.

Pneumonia was confirmed, and I was admitted. Although none of the other doctors I’d seen thought it had anything to do with the virus, regulations required the hospital ER to do the test. When I got a bed assignments, I was taken through back corridors of the hospital to private elevators, where I ended up in a unit only for isolation. Only one person, my nurse, could come in my room on their 12 hour shift. The room had a window where they could see and make sure I was doing okay.
Instead of coming in the room, the doctors would sit in front of the window and call my room phone to do my visit for the day. My phone rang all day with people in the hospital wanting to “help”.

On the third day, I got the test results back. They were negative... woo hoo! Not so fast. The dang doctor ordered a 2nd one because the tests are only accurate 60% of the time. And he threateningly said that I HAD to have a 2nd test or he could keep me there 14 days or more (and he was speaking of after my one symptom disappeared - respiratory issues.). So the 2nd test was done, and yay!... the next morning got the once again negative result.

I got moved to a progressive care unit where all they had to wear was a droplet face mask and gloves when dealing with me. It was the first time in days I had seen anyone but “space aliens” all decked out, from head to toe, in their isolation garb. The masks were like smaller gas masks with shields pulled down in front of those. I think I had a super cute nurse, but it was so hard to tell as he was hardly visible. Nice eyes though! Lol.

I’ve been here almost a week, and hopefully get to leave today or tomorrow with continuous home oxygen and the pneumonia almost gone. You cannot see one person in the hospital without a face mask except the patients in their rooms. And it’ll probanly never change.
 
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