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Hi folks, still searching for a poodle for my family and just found a very special dog on petfinder.
10 month old Newfoundland-poodle mix. 100lb. And growing.

 

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One of Zephyr's friends is a Newfoundland-poodle mix named Newman. He is a nice dog, although I don't really see the poodle in him. He is black with a harsh wiry coat, probably about 100 lbs . He is very laid back, doesn't play much, so Zephyr tends to run circles around him a lot. They were in an obedience class together when they were both youngsters, and now they meet sometimes in the park where we walk every day.

Have you met Auggie?
 

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This is a super cute fellow. A warning - some of these poodle mixes especially between very differently structured dogs can wind up with major orthopedic problems. There was a sweet newfie/poodle cross in a poodle rescue group here who is basically going to be on pain management for life because of numerous deformations in his shoulders, legs and hips. His story is here if you scroll down: Latest News
That's not to say this boy is not deserving of a loving home - especially since this is an adoption situation and no money seems to be going to a "breeder" - but it's something to be aware of.
 

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Although @Oonapup is totally correct about the dangers of mixed breeding different size and shaped dogs. You wouldnt necessarily be any better off with a rescue dog that has been labelled as 'purebred'. I fostered a 'purebred' chihuahua who was not well bred and had two bad knees at 6 which will probably need expensive surgery.

I looked at rescues before going for a breeder. My method of selecting a rescue dog is very different from when I select a breed from a quality breeder.

For a rescue breed does still matter but not as much. Its better to understand why you want that breed rather than finding any dog of that breed because a rescue dog may not have the qualities of its breed (sometimes bred dogs dont either but thats another discussion).

So if you picked the standard poodle for its non-shedding coat and athleticism then I would be cautious of a spoo-newfie mix. But I would still call and inquire, see if he matches your needs.
 

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I'd expect hip dysplasia at a minimum. Also I'd be afraid of the grooming for that dog. I can't imagine what a groomer would charge for a dog that big. Some probably wouldn't be able to accommodate the size.
 

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The bottom line with rescues is that you honestly do not know what you will get in terms of behavior and health issues. Are you able to apply and then meet him? Have an honest conversation with the foster parent?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'd expect hip dysplasia at a minimum. Also I'd be afraid of the grooming for that dog. I can't imagine what a groomer would charge for a dog that big. Some probably wouldn't be able to accommodate the size.
I posted Auggie thinking a member here might know of a home for him. Very sad. My guess was $150 per trim type grooming or higher. 10 months old and already dumped into rescue. I suspect someone paid thousands for him as a young pup. I had not realized these mixed might have major orthopedic problems.
 

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I posted Auggie thinking a member here might know of a home for him. Very sad. My guess was $150 per trim type grooming or higher. 10 months old and already dumped into rescue. I suspect someone paid thousands for him as a young pup. I had not realized these mixed might have major orthopedic problems.
Like Curlflooffan says, you can't ever know what you're getting with a rescue. I didn't mean to imply he would definitely have problems or to warn people away, but I thought that you were considering him yourself, and I would have wanted to know about these issues if I was considering adopting because I had an unsubstantiated faith in "hybrid vigor" that I have now learned doesn't hold true with mixes bred for popularity and $$. That said - my experience with rescue recently during the pandemic was that even though (in my opinion) we are an ideal potential home, every dog had so many applications that we would have been waiting indefinitely with no guarantee - so anyway, if this guy is friendly with people, dogs, kids and doesn't seem to have major physical or behavioral problems at this point, he'll probably find a new home pretty quickly. If I had to guess, it would be that he had a poodle puppy energy with a newfie puppy's size and that might have been too much for his family to handle.
 

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For grooming, it might be worth your effort to take the time to desensitize puppy to the process at home. For $150 you can get an entry/intermediate level pair of trimmers. I can't imagine a groomer would do any fancy trim on a mix any different from your all-purpose youtube groomer. For how big puppy is, a "1 size all over and a trim around the face/ears" would do the trick... which is like the guy version of a buzz cut at the barber and requires almost zero grooming skill. After 2 trims the equiptment would pay for itself. Plus, it's good for bonding, and you could do a WAY better job at home that meets your standard.

Just something to consider if you get that far.
 

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It doesn’t look like they expect to have trouble placing him, it says they’re only accepting applications until a certain time and will choose from that pool of candidates.
 

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I had not realized these mixed might have major orthopedic problems.
For various reasons, disparate sizes, builds, and if the cross is from two purebreds, there'd also be the genetic issues of each breed to consider.

Hope the boy is found by a happy home.
 
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