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Interesting article. Particularly sad and disturbing to see the 1915 photos of dogs compared to today’s ”modern bred” Version.

I found photos on line from what I believe is the same source used in the article only these are poodles. To my layman’s eyes they look the same.
I know there has been research done using dogs who were trained to be aware and to follow instructions while taking functional MRIs. I wonder if this research used similarly trained dogs?
 

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Not only do the poodles look the same, the breed standard hasn't changed much. Change the haircut, and you'd have a modern poodle ready for the show ring. Elegant outline then, elegant outline now. Almond eyes then, almond eyes now. Ears close to the head then, ears close to the head now. Muscular back then, muscular back now. Tail on high then, tail on high now. Dense harsh coat then, and dense harsh coat now. They haven't bred poodles to be heavier, or taller, or wider, or shorter. Probably because poodles are perfect, then, now, and forever.
 

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Not only do the poodles look the same, the breed standard hasn't changed much. Change the haircut, and you'd have a modern poodle ready for the show ring. Elegant outline then, elegant outline now. Almond eyes then, almond eyes now. Ears close to the head then, ears close to the head now. Muscular back then, muscular back now. Tail on high then, tail on high now. Dense harsh coat then, and dense harsh coat now. They haven't bred poodles to be heavier, or taller, or wider, or shorter. Probably because poodles are perfect, then, now, and forever.
I'd love to do some reading on the move away from partis. Do you have any good resources on the history of poodles? I'd especially enjoy having a book to add to my collection.
 

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Not only do the poodles look the same, the breed standard hasn't changed much. Change the haircut, and you'd have a modern poodle ready for the show ring. Elegant outline then, elegant outline now. Almond eyes then, almond eyes now. Ears close to the head then, ears close to the head now. Muscular back then, muscular back now. Tail on high then, tail on high now. Dense harsh coat then, and dense harsh coat now. They haven't bred poodles to be heavier, or taller, or wider, or shorter. Probably because poodles are perfect, then, now, and forever.
My little guy Rudy has everything but the coarse coat. His is soft and wavy and can get pin mats if I'm not attentive. :(
 

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My little guy Rudy has everything but the coarse coat. His is soft and wavy and can get pin mats if I'm not attentive. :(
Seems there were at least scissors and possibly razors used. Here's just a few words I found: Curly Coated Retrievers were the first breed of dog to receive grooming from their human masters. This was done to help these dogs swim better in water to retrieve hunted animals sometime between 1500 and 1600 AD. At this time, grooming was seen as a solution to a hunting problem, not as a need for health or even aesthetics.
 

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I was at the vet's and today another customer had a beautiful German Shepard 3 month old puppy. Everything about him was proportional and perfect. The thing is, this GS could never win a Conformation show now. He had the classic look that was valued 30+ years ago, before show breeders altered the body and back legs. I couldn't take my eyes off him.

I asked her where she got him, and was not surprised when she said petfinder.com. Her puppy's ancestors likely haven't had a show champion in 30 years, which oddly protected the lines (unless of course it's a carrier for a genetic condition).

If you think of a family tree of breed like a branch, it's like there's been genetic split among GSD's (and other purebreds). On one branch are the originals, and on a smaller branch are the lines that have been tampered with by zealous breeders. I also saw this travesty in action back in the late 1980s when a few influential breeders recategorized Himalayan cats with Persians, resulting in flat-faced Himmies with breathing problems.

Here's the GS Best of Breed Winner in the 2016 Crufts Dog Show from this article, which also addresses other breeds and in particular, the Pekinese.



Quote: "The RSPCA was not so amused – and singled him out [the Pekinese] as one of 'many' dogs which 'showed visible signs of poor health and/or discomfort' as a result of their 'exaggerated' shape."
 

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I love the corded look- but oh the work involved. Can't imagine working with a full corded poodle. Asta's topknot is corded and keeping up with his corded head is a daily thing. Sometimes I look at him and think maybe I should cut his cords. but I love my dog's rasta look so I work on it, and work on it.
 

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I was at the vet's and today another customer had a beautiful German Shepard 3 month old puppy. Everything about him was proportional and perfect. The thing is, this GS could never win a Conformation show now. He had the classic look that was valued 30+ years ago, before show breeders altered the body and back legs. I couldn't take my eyes off him.

I asked her where she got him, and was not surprised when she said petfinder.com. Her puppy's ancestors likely haven't had a show champion in 30 years, which oddly protected the lines (unless of course it's a carrier for a genetic condition).

If you think of a family tree of breed like a branch, it's like there's been genetic split among GSD's (and other purebreds). On one branch are the originals, and on a smaller branch are the lines that have been tampered with by zealous breeders. I also saw this travesty in action back in the late 1980s when a few influential breeders recategorized Himalayan cats with Persians, resulting in flat-faced Himmies with breathing problems.
Vita - I've noticed this about some non-registered dogs of a breed looking more "sound" than the registered ones too! My parents had a non-registered St. Bernard. She looked exactly like the Saints from earlier pictures, and the vet commented she had excellent hips/hind legs to the day she died (osteosarcoma at 8 or 9). She did have some front end issues, but I wonder if it was due to early spay on a giant breed (we got her at age 3). When I look at "show" saints, they look very different - pushed in face (ours had a normal nose), excessive folds (I saw a comment somewhere about a champion that was disqualified at one show because the dog couldn't see!), droopy loose drooly lips, etc. Here's photos of our Saint (with the red pack) vs a 2018 National Dog Show Saint, vs a picture from a guided walk at the monastery they originate in. I'm not saying she was perfect, but I'd say my non-registered saint looks far closer to the original than the modern show dogs. Look at how much lankier the monastery saints are than the show dog.

My personal theory with poodles is that breeders have been too busy being obsessed with the hair and the grooming to start messing with the body shape - I notice that modern poodles do seem to have much denser hair than the old photos/drawings
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I fostered a stray GSD mix puppy who was exquisite. She ended up being adopted by a passionate GSD couple, one of whom came from a family of longtime breeders. She ordered a genetic test, thinking maybe we'd stumbled on a uniquely coloured purebred. Nope. Half GSD, part chow, and the rest a mystery. But she looked like the Shepherd of my dreams.

Genetics are fascinating.
 

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very interesting article! actually what im afraid of turns out that my dog becomes afraid of too after some time which is funnyXD
 

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Found this article by Dr. Becker on how humans have shaped dogs brains interesting but also how the physical appearance of our dogs has changed since 1915 due to breeding. Here's the link:https://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2019/12/13/selective-breeding-dogs.aspx?cid_source=petsnl&cid_medium=email&cid_content=art1HL&cid=20191213Z1&et_cid=DM408102&et_rid=768755342
Hi Charleeann67 I thought her article was interesting also. Saved it to read again. This is the article Dr. Becker did last year on Christmas eve about my Canine Lullabies that you might find interesting also.
https://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2018/12/24/calming-music-for-dogs.aspx
 

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Vita - I've noticed this about some non-registered dogs of a breed looking more "sound" than the registered ones too! ... My personal theory with poodles is that breeders have been too busy being obsessed with the hair and the grooming to start messing with the body shape - I notice that modern poodles do seem to have much denser hair than the old photos/drawings...
Thank Gawd.
 
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