Poodle Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi! So my first poodle pup is coming home in a few months, and I’m super excited. Because of weird work rules, Im only gonna get a day and a half off with him when he first comes home, before I have to go back to working 8 hours a day. My plan for keeping him safe and happy was setting up a fairly large, completely puppy proofed room for him, with loads of enrichment and a pee pad in the corner, for those 8 hours im away. However, eventually I’d like to bell train him for using the bathroom outside.

Does anyone have any tips or resources on switching him over once the time comes, of any alternatives? (ie when he can handle holding his bladder for 6-8 hours… probably like 7-8 months) I’ve considered giving him a doggy door, but we have two cats who would love to escape out that door :( Thanks!!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,503 Posts
I personally don't care for pee pads. On the rare occasions when I've used them with puppies, I usually return to a wadded up partially shredded pee pad and a wet spot on the floor. I have had better luck with a vinyl backed picnic blanket or whelping blanket.
Additionally, consider checking out the Ian Dunbar books Before and After You Get Your Puppy. He advocates setting up a crate and litter pan inside an exercise pen. Fill the litter pan with sod or a material similar to what the puppy will use outside. I've used his method with some success.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,524 Posts
It's understandable that you have work obligations, but it is so not ideal to leave a new puppy alone for so long, especially at that young age and especially while you are trying to get to know each other.
Kidnapped From Planet Dog - Whole Dog Journal (whole-dog-journal.com)

He will just have been taken from all that he knows and loves and will be needing comfort.
Is there anyone you trust to come check on him daily, half way thru your day?

Cowpony gives a great suggestion on the Ian Dunbar books. They're online as a free pdf read.

BEFORE You Get Your Puppy.pdf (dogstardaily.com)
QAFTER 2003/01/07 (dogstardaily.com)

Errorless Housetraining | Dog Star Daily

I also suggest the litter box/grass pad idea rather than chewable, swallowable pads since he will be unsupervised for so long.

Also, if the breeder isn't training to a pad/box before he comes home, Puppy will likely not have any idea what they're for, beyond entertainment.

The expen is a better idea than a whole room since he'll be unsupervised for hours.


Typically, puppies don't have full neuromuscular control til around 6m. You need to think of human infant development as a guide.
This means that
a/ they don't any idea that they even need to go until it happens for some weeks, even a few months
b/ once they do recognize the need to go they need to find a way to communicate that need to their human
c/ they need to have the ability to recognize the urge and be able to hold it until the human recognizes the communication and acts.

Second to helping them understand the house rules is the corresponding health concerns with holding eliminations. Just as it can be unhealthy for humans to do so, it can be unhealthy for dogs to do so, even if they can.

My boys are miniatures, fully housetrained for years, but with exceptions for carting my husband off to the hospital a few times, where they were left alone for 6h or so, I would never deliberately ask them to routinely wait for 8-10 hours. 4-6 hours is the longest I'd ask an adult dog to wait.


Transitioning down the road can be done but seems low on the priority list for now.
 

·
Registered
Phoebe Duck spoo, Frannie Jane pitt mix
Joined
·
523 Posts
The day I picked up Phoebe, I bought a brand new pack of puppy pee pads. I put one down, and came back to confetti. She had a blast shredding it. I haven't bothered since. Maybe you'll have better luck than I did, but a backup plan is advisable. Can a neighbor help out for a bit? Maybe check on her at least once?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,760 Posts
I chose to use a litterbox with wood pellets - less smelly than a pee pad. I definitely did come home in the first days to find a puppy sleeping in the litter pan and a puddle on the floor though! I also liked the litterbox solution because it doesn't train them to use soft surfaces and provides a raised edge so you don't get as many accidents that are only half on the pad. I started it out by 'seeding' it with some outdoor urine (snow I collected) and found it worked best to only change half the litter at a time. Keeping the floor scruptiously clean by mopping with enzyme cleaner also helped with accuracy.

I was working and living in an apartment and Annie had a very fast bladder, so the litterbox saved a lot of cleanup.

Honestly, my dog weaned herself off of using a litterbox. She got treats and praise for going outdoors, and praise for using the litterbox. It payed off for her to wait ! By the time I finally got around to getting rid of it, she hadn't used it in months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,773 Posts
We used pee pads to train Normie (the weather was really bad and neither of us could face the stairs). When we put him on the pad we said 'Pee.' When we complied, we said "PEE. Good dog."

Come more clement weather we moved a used pee pad outside. He got the idea, especially since he'd been taught the words for 'pee' and 'pooh.' Plus he'd been peeing outside when we went on walks.

We also used pee pads for our aged Aussie Terrier who was blind and had trouble walking. He adapted quickly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
I am personally not a fan of pee pads. In my experience, they make house training take much longer. However, since you'll be working, I think a litter box is a much better solution. I would also recommend having someone, if you can, come by at least once while you are away to check on puppy (making sure he has sufficient food & water, a potty break, and a little playtime).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
My daughter has had a "dog walker" for any day when they are away from home for more than 6 hours. In the long run, I believe it would be beneficial to both you and the pup to have some knowledgeable person interact with the pup daily at least for the first few months.
 

·
Registered
Aliana
Joined
·
59 Posts
I had a neighbor let her out to pee a few times a day when she was 8 weeks , then 2, and finally once about noon then when I get home before 5 she gets a quick pee and a long sniffy walk at 6 (when it’s not as hot). She is able to hold it 6 hrs comfortably now, and I get up at midnight to let her pee, have a snack of cottage cheese, I take my meds and it’s back to bed.
If she has an urgent need, she’ll bark to get me up to take her out.

A cautionary tale. I facilitated the adoption of a friends “Oops! Litter”. Black lab mama, 70 pounds,his hunting dog and a very clever and amorous 30pound red heeler—who contrived through a chain link fence! to get her with puppy. One lady adopted the lone blue Merle puppy, but all were lab in confirmation,coat and color (black). Her first dog, she bought everything they would sell her at Petsmart —including pee pads. Fast forward 8 months and she had a 50 lb puppy that went inside on pads! I told her to teach her to potty outside, but she didn’t listen. I had to laugh, but you have to plan and train for the size they will be when grown. 😉
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,345 Posts
I would have someone good with training dogs come in 2-3 times a day. It may sound expensive but I can't see having a puppy left for so long. Best wishes with this. Not sure I would have gotten a puppy if I had such a work schedule.
 

·
Registered
Aliana
Joined
·
59 Posts
I’m blessed with dog savvy friends and neighbors and even have a local poodle breeder’s daughter who I can pay to come if the neighbor is incapacitated.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top