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Hi Poodle Owners,
I have a male 11-week-old black toy poodle named Jack who keeps biting on my hands, as well as on strangers' hands and toes. He seems to be just playing, but I need to find a way to stop this behavior before it becomes a problem. None of this nibbling is meant to be vicious I assume, but it sometimes puts me in a bad mood when I am playing with him and he is being so cute and then grabs on to my hand with his tiny needle teeth.

Does the water bottle spray theory actually work? I have been trying that, and it seems like torture for my poor 3 pounder. Let me know, Thanks.

I am also curious if Jack is going to be able to be groomed at 4 months if he plans on nibbling on the groomer the whole time. I am so excited for him to be old enough to be groomed but I don't want the groomer being manhandled either.
 

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I don't have experience with puppy training, but I think mouthing is pretty normal at that age. Encourage him to use a toy instead of your fingers. :)

Others on here with more experience will tell you more.
 

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Sam mouthed ALOT when he was a puppy. I would just gently hold his mouth shut until just after he got annoyed and tried to pull away. He got the idea quickly. You should do this with no other reaction to him, sometimes when we jump or yell "ouch" its a kind of feedback for them. Just ignore him grab his mouth then go on with your play.
 

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Ok, I am VERY EXPERIENCED when it comes to this issue. :p

Please try this:

Each time you are playing with the puppy and the playing gets
too rough and he bites you or just nips you randomly, make
a high pitched loud yelping sound resembling a puppy in pain.
When puppies at a young age get to rough playing with their
siblings,their littermates will make a yelping sound like the one
I toldyou to make to show they are in pain and they are playing
too rough with them. Do not forget to do this each time, and it also
helps if you turn your back to them and ignore them after you make
the sound.

It really works and corrects them. I watched this technique being
done by a professional dog trainer on tv. :)
 
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