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My parents had two black standard Poodles, both of which were wonderful and pure joy. Sadly, both are now gone (with the second one, who was absolutely perfect in every respect, passing earlier this week).

Nobody can ever replace them, and we are all devastated.

I see a black standard Poodle up for adoption at a local rescue shelter. My parents have stated that one reason why they're so upset is that there is a huge void in their lives now.

Is it too soon to send the link to the rescue shelter (featuring the beautiful Poodle) to them? If it's appropriate to send it to them, how would you do it?

Thank you!
 

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Elroy: Standard Poodle, Born 02/20/21
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Only your parents can tell you the answer. Even though you're being very loving and thoughtful about it, it's possible that, in a way, they may not want another dog right away. It's also possible that they do (in time). There are certain liberties that come with no longer having to care for your pet, and there are many responsibilities that come with another.
 

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I would treat this as two separate questions:
1) When should I start encouraging my grieving parents to look for a new dog?
2) Is applying for a rescue poodle the right choice for my parents?

The answer to the first question varies. I tend to jump right in and get a new pet after the previous one passes on. However, some people need to take more time to mourn. Honestly, even for me I probably jumped a little too soon when I got puppy Galen after my boy Snarky died. Galen was difficult to housebreak and had a lot of drive. My mix of grief for Snarky and frustration at Galen being a difficult puppy sometimes combined to make me very angry at Galen for not being Snarky. I took my responsibility to rear Galen properly very seriously and fought hard to keep my conflicted feelings from affecting him, but I would say there were definitely some periods of buyer's remorse.

Regarding the second question, poodles are highly adoptable. They tend not to stick around in rescue very long; they may even be gone before you submit the application. So, are you prepared to be disappointed if the application is rejected? Additionally, good poodle breeders work hard to keep their dogs out of rescue. When a poodle ends up in rescue, it's worth asking what the dog's background is.
 

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There’s still a huge void in my life that Gracie left behind in 2019. Peggy didn’t fill it. Yes, she kept me busy and distracted, but maybe I could have used that energy on other things I’d been putting off through Gracie’s senior years.

I think when your parents are ready for another dog, they’ll tell you. Hold space for that conversation and be ready to listen.

Do you have a dog of your own? Maybe your parents could do some doggy sitting.
 

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Leo (GSD), Lily (APBT), and Simon (SPoo)
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Each person grieves differently. Some can't imagine life without a dog in it, and want a successor to their late dog as soon as possible. Other people need years before they can even think about looking for a successor.
 
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IMO it's too soon to do anything more than ask them what they want to do if they mention the void, being lonely, missing having a dog, etc. "I'm sorry you feel that, i miss them too, what do you want to do? Are you thinking of getting another dog? What can i do to help?"

They need to come to the decision that they want another dog themselves, not have it sprung on them (even if done with good will). It's one thing to ask if they're thinking of another dog, another thing to show them pictures of dogs ready to be adopted and strongly hint they should consider it. If they don't come up with "gee, maybe another dog is a good idea" then it's not really them thinking it, is it?

If it's their decision, then by all means help them get things in motion. Have they mentioned previously that they would be interested in another dog? Or that they would get another Poodle? Or have they not, maybe they talked about doing something else that they couldn't/wouldn't/didn't do because they had a dog to think about? It's possible to miss a dog without missing having a dog, you know?
 

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I am so sorry for the losses of your family’s dogs. Since they were both “perfect”, I would simply offer condolences and a subdued offer to help your parents find another dog(s) when and if they are ready. Maybe they will enjoy the freedom of being dog free as suggested, or maybe they gotta have another dog to feel whole again. Their grief, their timeline.
 
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