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Discussion Starter #1
After many hours of research, reading and watching videos, I have compiled a checklist of what I think will be needed for our future Standard.

I hope to not go overboard with everything and regret some of my purchases, but I also want to be super prepared.

Some items on the list...
Feeding: Kongs, water dish, food, food container/scoop etc.
Outdoor: Collar, harness, leash, ID, city license, poo bags, boots, coat etc.
Indoor: Crate, beds, toys, training treats, enzymatic cleaner etc.
Grooming: Clippers, HV dryer, shears, tooth brush/paste, brushes/combs, shampoo/conditioner, nail clippers/grinder etc.

With all the items on my list it adds up to about $1,000 CAD. Is this amount generally expected for a brand new Spoo owner? Or am I being a little crazy? Are there some things I could/should skip for now? I am already planning to buy this stuff, but I just thought I would get some insight from the more experienced and see if there are different areas to focus on.

What did everyone else invest in before their puppy arrived? Did anything go to waste, was over-hyped or never got used?

Any advice would be wonderful.
 

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My puppy will be a year later this month, so I suppose I'm in a good position to respond here :act-up:

Feeding: Kongs, water dish, food, food container/scoop etc.
Only one kong for a puppy. They dont need more right away and our Spoo never really loved them. You might want to add in a buffalo horn or two and some fun treats and snacks.

Outdoor: Collar, harness, leash, ID, city license, poo bags, boots, coat etc.
We've never done boots or a coat. It doesnt get super-cold here, but your puppy shouldnt walk much when tiny and you may not need boots until next year. Also, unless you plan to go super-short a Spoo doesnt really need a coat

Indoor: Crate, beds, toys, training treats, enzymatic cleaner etc.
crate plus liner is all you need to start. Phoebe destroyed three beds in one twenty-four hour period a few months ago, so I would wait on that if I were you. Maybe try one bed to start. Yes to toys, training treats, and cleaner.

Grooming: Clippers, HV dryer, shears, tooth brush/paste, brushes/combs, shampoo/conditioner, nail clippers/grinder etc.

Are you planning to do all the grooming yourself? We just started with a tooth brush/paste, brush, bottle of shampoo, and dremel. Not the clippers, dryer, etc.

I think we spent more like $400 to get started, it certainly wasnt $1000.

Congrats on your new addition! Please post pics when you have them home :act-up:
 

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Some items on the list...
Feeding: Kongs, water dish, food, food container/scoop etc.
-Kong, good.
-Bowls, containers, scoops. These items can often be found very cheap at thrift stores. Our vet gave us a free/promo scoop at our first appointment, along with some other goodies.

Outdoor: Collar, harness, leash, ID, city license, poo bags, boots, coat etc.
-Sometimes a breeder may include a collar and leash. If not, keep it basic. A standard puppy will outgrow its first collar pretty quickly. I've never bought boots for my dogs. I did buy a $4 coat for Willard, since we took him on a winter camping trip when he was only 10 weeks old. Otherwise, our dogs have never worn coats. I live in St Catharines.

Indoor: Crate, beds, toys, training treats, enzymatic cleaner etc.
-Amazon.ca has real good deals on basic wire crates with dividers. Much cheaper than many pet stores. Skip beds. Your puppy is likely to chew / ruin it very quickly. I'd suggest some cheap fleece blankets that are easy to wash. Dollarama usually has some nice little ones in the pet section. A variety of treats are good. Don't buy large quantities until you find out what your pup likes best. Enzymatic cleaner is a must.

Grooming: Clippers, HV dryer, shears, tooth brush/paste, brushes/combs, shampoo/conditioner, nail clippers/grinder etc.
-I won't pretend to be a good source of grooming advice. I'll let others touch on that.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
My puppy will be a year later this month, so I suppose I'm in a good position to respond here :act-up:

Feeding: Kongs, water dish, food, food container/scoop etc.
Only one kong for a puppy. They dont need more right away and our Spoo never really loved them. You might want to add in a buffalo horn or two and some fun treats and snacks.

Outdoor: Collar, harness, leash, ID, city license, poo bags, boots, coat etc.
We've never done boots or a coat. It doesnt get super-cold here, but your puppy shouldnt walk much when tiny and you may not need boots until next year. Also, unless you plan to go super-short a Spoo doesnt really need a coat

Indoor: Crate, beds, toys, training treats, enzymatic cleaner etc.
crate plus liner is all you need to start. Phoebe destroyed three beds in one twenty-four hour period a few months ago, so I would wait on that if I were you. Maybe try one bed to start. Yes to toys, training treats, and cleaner.

Grooming: Clippers, HV dryer, shears, tooth brush/paste, brushes/combs, shampoo/conditioner, nail clippers/grinder etc.

Are you planning to do all the grooming yourself? We just started with a tooth brush/paste, brush, bottle of shampoo, and dremel. Not the clippers, dryer, etc.

I think we spent more like $400 to get started, it certainly wasnt $1000.

Congrats on your new addition! Please post pics when you have them home :act-up:
Thanks for you reply.

Treats and chews are definitely going to be abundant. I guess Kongs are a personal preference for each dog, some have little interest as you mentioned.

You are probably correct about the coat/boots. It does get pretty intensely cold here, but it probably wouldn't be a necessity unless it was very wet and slushy. I was thinking that getting the puppy familiar with the feeling of a coat and boots would aid in any future need to use them, but maybe I could just use socks or sew up my own little coat, lol.

I have definitely read many stories about dogs destroying their beds, so thank you for that reminder. I will stock up on fleece blankets instead.

I do hope to do the grooming myself. I have had a bit of experience with our Shih-tzu we had growing up, and I also had a Maltese mix for a period of time. Though I may want to have a pro help for the first several groomings while the puppy is young.

Thanks for your help, I will keep revising my list.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Some items on the list...
Feeding: Kongs, water dish, food, food container/scoop etc.
-Kong, good.
-Bowls, containers, scoops. These items can often be found very cheap at thrift stores. Our vet gave us a free/promo scoop at our first appointment, along with some other goodies.

Outdoor: Collar, harness, leash, ID, city license, poo bags, boots, coat etc.
-Sometimes a breeder may include a collar and leash. If not, keep it basic. A standard puppy will outgrow its first collar pretty quickly. I've never bought boots for my dogs. I did buy a $4 coat for Willard, since we took him on a winter camping trip when he was only 10 weeks old. Otherwise, our dogs have never worn coats. I live in St Catharines.

Indoor: Crate, beds, toys, training treats, enzymatic cleaner etc.
-Amazon.ca has real good deals on basic wire crates with dividers. Much cheaper than many pet stores. Skip beds. Your puppy is likely to chew / ruin it very quickly. I'd suggest some cheap fleece blankets that are easy to wash. Dollarama usually has some nice little ones in the pet section. A variety of treats are good. Don't buy large quantities until you find out what your pup likes best. Enzymatic cleaner is a must.

Grooming: Clippers, HV dryer, shears, tooth brush/paste, brushes/combs, shampoo/conditioner, nail clippers/grinder etc.
-I won't pretend to be a good source of grooming advice. I'll let others touch on that.
Thank you!

Great point, we have lots of thrift stores around.

I will try to go cheap/simple with the puppy gear, even though it will be a challenge not to buy all the cute puppy-sized stuff.

I have a wishlist going on Amazon.ca for the crate and toys, they for sure have better pricing than the stores around here. I will be skipping the beds for now and stocking up on fleece blankets, that is a much better idea. That is great advice about the treats!
 

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I bought a crate, but didn't use it - I eventually got a car crate which has been much more useful. Lots of cheap fleece blankets, which are useful for bedding and for keeping furniture and car clean. I already had bowls for the cats, and just added more to the collection over the years. Some of the same food the breeder was using. Several Kongs, so one could be in use, one in the freezer and one in the dishwasher. Collar and leash - my dogs are so tiny that the puppy size has continued to fit them. Toys - IKEA rats and mice, stacking cups and other toys have been favourites. A very big bottle of enzyme cleaner - an absolute essential. I didn't buy much stuff in advance even for the first puppy, but the enzyme cleaner was probably the purchase I appreciated most! I doubt I spent more than £50/$65 on puppy supplies - mostly I just used things I already had.

Apart from a brush and comb I waited a while to get the full grooming kit - I wanted to be sure that I really was up for doing it myself. Once I was certain I invested in a good clipper, several pairs of scissors and a height adjustable table, all of which have been well worth the money. Over the years I have probably spent around £400/$525, but that was not all at once.
 
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I bought way too much stuff for Lucky but now I have everything so I give them to my friends with dogs. I advise accumulating on a need basis to avoid clutter.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

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Our dogs have never liked Kongs very well so I would get one and see if your pup likes it. If not then you might consider these which our dogs love even as adults. Start with a small and if your pup likes it add a large. to make it more challenging the top of the small fits inside of the top of the large to make a harder puzzle to get food to come out of. https://www.westpaw.com/dog-toys/puzzle/toppl-treat-toy


I would not buy too many toys. While our older dogs adore soft toys and Peeves loves his giant Jolly Ball, Javelin simply has virtually no interest in toys. I have always tended to let Lily choose her toys (but not balls since she is so obsessed with them, she has balls but I control all aspects of them).


Otherwise your list looks very comprehensive.
 

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Our dogs have never liked Kongs very well so I would get one and see if your pup likes it. If not then you might consider these which our dogs love even as adults.
It does take some time, and a little trial and error to find out what type of toys a dog will like.

My Willard turned out to be a destroyer. The moment pictured below was a bit of a turning point for me, and my toy shopping. I brought home a new toy for Willard. It looked pretty tough, with the soft parts encased in a rubber wheel of sorts. He had half the stuffing out of it, and was ripping off rubber chunks, the same afternoon it came home. The rubber chunks could be a hazard, so the toy was garbage.

Untitled by Ryan Jakob, on Flickr

I took a look at the three toys that had actually held up to his abuse. Two were Kong brand, and one was West Paw.
 

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I spent way too much pre-puppy. I was afraid that I would miss something and my puppy would know it. But the main reason I think I collected all that stuff was my Obsessive-Compulsive behavior. Turns out I didn't need a bunch of stuff so I gave that stuff to our local rescue. They were happy to see me come in with all sorts of things for their dogs.
 

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I agree with those who said to go easy. Here is what I got for Zoe:

An exercise pen. A cheap plastic shower curtain to go on the floor (carpet) and over it an exercise pen mat. A top for the ex pen to keep it nice and square and to prevent climbing out.

A crate - I favor plastic airline crates because they make a nice, draft-proof den. Easy to clean. If you use a wire crate, you can cover top/sides/back with a towel to make a den.

A crate pad and old towels to make a nice bed in the crate.

Water bowl - heavy ceramic so it's hard to tip over. Food bowl - ceramic - easy to clean and hard to tip over. Cheap plastic measuring cup(s) to measure food.

A soft snuggle toy to keep her company at night. Small tennis balls to chase. Rope toys to chew. Etc.

Cheap collar (puppies grow fast) and string lead (available at dog shows) or just a piece of cord from home store. I did not have to get these because 1) Zoe was going to be shown, so no collar except to go places and 2) I have dozens of collars and leads as the result of having dogs for over 50 years.

Pin brush and good metal comb. Slicker brush (I like the little Safari slicker that has smooth tips on the pins to prevent scratching the skin). Tearless shampoo. Conditioner.

Clippers (I prefer my corded Andis). The only clipper blades I use on a puppy are a 15 (around the anus, on the belly, underside of tail, upper inside of back legs) and a 30 (face, feet, tail). For a white puppy or an apricot with sensitive skin I would probably use a 10 and a 15.

Grooming table with arm (and noose until puppy understands that jumping off the grooming table is absolutely forbidden).

Dremel-type nail grinder and/or scissor-type nail clippers. You need to keep those nails done every week or two or they will get too long and become a problem to trim.

You want to brush and comb at least 3 times a week so the puppy is comfortable with being groomed. Face/feet/tail about every 3 weeks (or less). Baths at least every 3 weeks, but can be done more often. Be SURE you use a good comb and comb down to the skin.

We put the exercise pen in the den so Zoe was always close to us. When she was reliably house broken (we have a doggie door that leads to a gravelled dog exercise area), she graduated to having the run of the house, but to this day she sleeps in her crate at night. Her crate is now in our bedroom. The other 3 dogs sleep in the bedroom, too. Only the senior dog sleeps on our bed (and I start him out on his own bed).
 

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I spend way to much on my girls, but the real expense is the teeth cleaning, shots, grooming ( and I do it inbetween). I keep track of every penny I spend on everything. My accountant, say my dog expense is way out of line, so I am truly trying to cut back. One good thing I have green lawn bags of toys in my shed. so every Christmas, I take the old ones out (I was before I put away) and wrap them up for my girls, and friends with dogs.
 

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You know the old story about buying a little kid an expensive toy only to watch them play with the box it came in? Boxes make good puppy toys, under supervision, of course. The best puppy toys I found were cardboard boxes and toilet paper tubes. We collected empty toilet paper tubes, put about 15 of them in a cardboard box, stepped back and watched the mayhem. The box and all the tubes looked like someone blew them up with explosives. There was paper everywhere. We'd clean it up, get them a new box filled with smaller boxes, and let them do it all over again.

I don't miss picking up piles of shredded cardboard every day, but I do miss the dual puppy hilarity of it all.
 

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The instructor at one of the puppy classes I took with Sophy suggested the cardboard box game, Click. Sophy loved it, but I was less enamoured, especially when she applied her newly learned skills for disembowelling containers of paper and cardboard to all the waste paper baskets in the house, in the hope there might be something interesting hidden at the bottom! That is still one of her inattention seeking activities, the things she saves up for the times when my attention is so occupied by phone or visitor she can reckon on 10 uninterrupted minutes...

I do agree about pups preferring free stuff - they love to chew and tear, and don't have much aesthetic sense, so cardboard tubes are ideal. I certainly would not spend much on puppy toys until I knew how the pup likes to play - I have been seduced into buying many cute toys over the years, only to have them completely ignored in favour of an IKEA mouse. Poppy hardly ever plays with toys - she will very occasionally chase after something thrown down the hall, but would much rather cuddle. Sophy prefers wrestling and tickling games, but has a few toys she likes to nibble, although when she was a pup she loved the squirrels in a log toys.
 
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Discussion Starter #15
I bought a crate, but didn't use it - I eventually got a car crate which has been much more useful. Lots of cheap fleece blankets, which are useful for bedding and for keeping furniture and car clean. I already had bowls for the cats, and just added more to the collection over the years. Some of the same food the breeder was using. Several Kongs, so one could be in use, one in the freezer and one in the dishwasher. Collar and leash - my dogs are so tiny that the puppy size has continued to fit them. Toys - IKEA rats and mice, stacking cups and other toys have been favourites. A very big bottle of enzyme cleaner - an absolute essential. I didn't buy much stuff in advance even for the first puppy, but the enzyme cleaner was probably the purchase I appreciated most! I doubt I spent more than £50/$65 on puppy supplies - mostly I just used things I already had.

Apart from a brush and comb I waited a while to get the full grooming kit - I wanted to be sure that I really was up for doing it myself. Once I was certain I invested in a good clipper, several pairs of scissors and a height adjustable table, all of which have been well worth the money. Over the years I have probably spent around £400/$525, but that was not all at once.
Thank you! I will be stocking up on the enzymatic cleaner for sure! It has eased my mind a bit learning that many poodle owners have been minimal with their spending, and just take things in stride. I will go over my list and organize it in order of importance from what everyone here has mentioned, and avoid some of the unnecessary things. :)
 

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Bitter apple spray was one of the best puppy items I bought! That, the cleaning spray, chews, and the crate.

Oh, and even if you don't spend a fortune initially, be aware that these guys are expensive city. I don't know about everyone else, but they are my second highest expense category.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I agree with those who said to go easy. Here is what I got for Zoe:

An exercise pen. A cheap plastic shower curtain to go on the floor (carpet) and over it an exercise pen mat. A top for the ex pen to keep it nice and square and to prevent climbing out.

A crate - I favor plastic airline crates because they make a nice, draft-proof den. Easy to clean. If you use a wire crate, you can cover top/sides/back with a towel to make a den.

A crate pad and old towels to make a nice bed in the crate.

Water bowl - heavy ceramic so it's hard to tip over. Food bowl - ceramic - easy to clean and hard to tip over. Cheap plastic measuring cup(s) to measure food.

A soft snuggle toy to keep her company at night. Small tennis balls to chase. Rope toys to chew. Etc.

Cheap collar (puppies grow fast) and string lead (available at dog shows) or just a piece of cord from home store. I did not have to get these because 1) Zoe was going to be shown, so no collar except to go places and 2) I have dozens of collars and leads as the result of having dogs for over 50 years.

Pin brush and good metal comb. Slicker brush (I like the little Safari slicker that has smooth tips on the pins to prevent scratching the skin). Tearless shampoo. Conditioner.

Clippers (I prefer my corded Andis). The only clipper blades I use on a puppy are a 15 (around the anus, on the belly, underside of tail, upper inside of back legs) and a 30 (face, feet, tail). For a white puppy or an apricot with sensitive skin I would probably use a 10 and a 15.

Grooming table with arm (and noose until puppy understands that jumping off the grooming table is absolutely forbidden).

Dremel-type nail grinder and/or scissor-type nail clippers. You need to keep those nails done every week or two or they will get too long and become a problem to trim.

You want to brush and comb at least 3 times a week so the puppy is comfortable with being groomed. Face/feet/tail about every 3 weeks (or less). Baths at least every 3 weeks, but can be done more often. Be SURE you use a good comb and comb down to the skin.

We put the exercise pen in the den so Zoe was always close to us. When she was reliably house broken (we have a doggie door that leads to a gravelled dog exercise area), she graduated to having the run of the house, but to this day she sleeps in her crate at night. Her crate is now in our bedroom. The other 3 dogs sleep in the bedroom, too. Only the senior dog sleeps on our bed (and I start him out on his own bed).
Thank you so much for sharing your list. I will be editing mine down for sure.

I have a crate on my list, but I have been back and forth between the wire and the plastic type. I hope to have it in our bedroom, and may want to be able to move it around. Would the plastic one be easier to move?

I absolutely plan to keep up minor grooming on a regular basis to help with getting the puppy used to it. It's saddening to see puppies ungroomed while they're young as I'm sure many of them have a difficult time with it once their older.

I have been reading reviews of all kinds of grooming equipment in order to get ones that will last, work well and be easy/comfortable to use. And I appreciate you mentioning the timeline for bathing, nail trims and grooming touch ups. A family member just got a Yorkie puppy a few weeks ago, and it's unfortunate that I can hear it's little nail click on the ground already... I will not be letting that happen.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I spend way to much on my girls, but the real expense is the teeth cleaning, shots, grooming ( and I do it inbetween). I keep track of every penny I spend on everything. My accountant, say my dog expense is way out of line, so I am truly trying to cut back. One good thing I have green lawn bags of toys in my shed. so every Christmas, I take the old ones out (I was before I put away) and wrap them up for my girls, and friends with dogs.
I can understand the temptation to spend on your dogs, it's fun, especially when your life revolves around them :)

I hadn't mentioned it yet, but we have a 6 year old chihuahua, and I can empathize with the teeth cleaning expense. She's had it done twice now and it is not only expensive, but nerve wracking to put her under anesthesia. It's one if the reasons why I am avoiding a small breed this time around. (Though I know large breeds need dental care too)
 

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You know the old story about buying a little kid an expensive toy only to watch them play with the box it came in? Boxes make good puppy toys, under supervision, of course. The best puppy toys I found were cardboard boxes and toilet paper tubes. We collected empty toilet paper tubes, put about 15 of them in a cardboard box, stepped back and watched the mayhem. The box and all the tubes looked like someone blew them up with explosives. There was paper everywhere. We'd clean it up, get them a new box filled with smaller boxes, and let them do it all over again.

I don't miss picking up piles of shredded cardboard every day, but I do miss the dual puppy hilarity of it all.
So true, good point! That sounds like so much fun to watch! You can never really run out of toilet paper rolls to use :D I will absolutely be doing this!
 

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I can understand the temptation to spend on your dogs, it's fun, especially when your life revolves around them :)

I hadn't mentioned it yet, but we have a 6 year old chihuahua, and I can empathize with the teeth cleaning expense. She's had it done twice now and it is not only expensive, but nerve wracking to put her under anesthesia. It's one if the reasons why I am avoiding a small breed this time around. (Though I know large breeds need dental care too)
They sure do! Make sure to brush your poodle's teeth every day! For a larger dog, they can have terrible teeth! I've already been given a warning by my vet that I need to brush daily because Frosty has some tartar on his molars, and his brother has already had to have a dental under anesthesia at 2 years old. The good thing about spoos is that they have a bigger mouth and will allow you to brush if you practice early. With small dogs, it's much more difficult.
 
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