Poodle Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been looking on this forum and can't find a thread about such subject so I thought I'd start one! Hopefully this thread will be beneficial for both old and new dog owners alike.

It's that time of year again where the days are getting longer and warmer! A lot of us know how to protect ourselves during the warmer weather; but some of us don't know how to help our 4 legged pals.

Generally, plenty of water and shade will do just fine for dogs in warm weather. As most of us know, dogs can't sweat! They have to pant in order to cool themselves, however, this depends largely on breed. Sometimes, no amount of panting will help.

Brachycephalic
Some breeds called Brachycephalic breeds struggle. Brachy means 'shortened', and Cephalic means 'head'. These ‘shortened head’ dogs have a limited airway to breathe through due to several factors. Unfortunately, it’s these 'abnormalities' that give those breeds the cute looks we're attracted to in the first place. This has gotten worse in recent years as breeding has caused these dogs’ faces to be even flatter as it's what's desired, and this gets in the way of their breathing. In summer, these issues become worse,. Extra precautions must be made to prevent heat exhaustion and heatstroke from occurring.

For one, these dogs can have small openings to their nose, known as nares.

Not as much air passes through these openings compared to dogs with longer faces. Inside the noses are the nasal conchae, the bones in the nose that aid in filtering and cooling or warming the air coming through the passage. The problem with brachycephalic dogs, however, is that their conchae fills up a lot of their nasal cavity, since the cavities are so small to begin with.

Many might think that these dogs would be able to simply use their mouths to breathe when they’re hot, right? Unfortunately, there are soft palates in their mouths that prevent air from getting to the trachea. Their tracheas can also be up to a quarter of the size of those in longer-faced dogs.

Brachycephalic dogs may not have all of these working against them, but even just one can cause serious problems. For them, trying to breathe is similar to a person trying to breathe while they have pneumonia and a fully congested chest and nose.

Some examples of brachycephalic breeds include:
  • Pug
  • Bulldog
  • Boston terriers
  • Chihuahuas
  • Shih Tzu's
  • Maltese

Thick coats
Other dogs which may struggle in the heat include dogs which are better suited to colder climates like Huskies and Malamutes. Also dogs with 'wool' like coats such as poodles and Bichons as this thick fleece traps the heat.

So how hot IS too hot?
Dogs suffering from heat stroke will become restless and uncomfortable as their body temperature rises. They will pant, have trouble breathing and feel weak and lethargic. They may whimper, cry out or bark as their discomfort increases. Eventually, affected animals will be in so much distress that they will lie down, become listless and slip into a coma. Unfortunately, by this point, death is fairly imminent unless the dog receives immediate and aggressive medical attention.

Most of the time, heat stroke happens to dogs on days that are exceptionally hot. Heat stroke is most common in very old dogs, and in very young puppies that are prone to over-exert themselves. Owners of dogs with heat stroke may recognize one or more of the following signs of this dangerous condition:
  • restless or agitated
  • Vocalizing
  • Panting
  • Frothing/ foaming at the mouth
  • Excessive drooling
  • Difficulty breathing
  • High heart rate
  • Dry mouth and gums
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhoea
  • Lethargy and weakness
  • Confusion
  • Seizures
  • Coma
  • Death

If your dog displays any of these symptoms, medical treatment may be necessary. If you are unsure if it is too hot for your dog, I have attached a refrence which may be of use. Text Yellow Font Line Screenshot


How to keep them cool.
The primary way to prevent discomfort and danger in your dogs is to keep them out of the heat altogether. Keep them indoors if possible. If they must be outside always ensure that they have plenty of water and shelter in the shade.

Exercise is always important but during the warmer months you ideally want to do this at dawn or dusk as it's cooler. Keep the exercise/ activity short and slower pace and maybe it's worth walking your dog using a harness rather than a collar as using the collar will press on the trachea (breathing pipe) not allowing enough air in.

Ensure your dog is an ideal weight. Overweight dogs will have an extra hard time during the warmer months as they have a thick layer of insulation fat wrapped round their body which keeps the heat in rather than letting it out.

There are plenty of cooling pet beds that are suitable for both indoor and outdoor use. You could maybe use a kiddie pool filled with lovely cool water to help your pooch or maybe some frozen treats!

If your dog has a long and/or thick coat maybe consider having it shaved down into a shorter cut to help keep them cool. There are plenty of styles you can find online that are both fashionable and functional so get creative.

If I've missed anything please share any tips, tricks and hairstyles below. Lets raise awareness and try and limit the amount of dogs that may suffer in the heat this year!

REMEMBER, DOGS DIE IN HOT CARS!!​
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,580 Posts
Great info... thank you for sharing!

Here in Florida where much of the year is in the 80’s, and much hotter in the summer, there are many accidental deaths by dogs left in cars.

In the 80’s, in a closed up car, it takes about 10 minutes to heat up to a horrendous 120°. This is on the local news frequently, but people don’t get it.

Even with air conditioning, especially if the sun is out, make sure to have fresh water available. In really excessive heat, I like to get an ice cream and give the dogs small bites of it. I don’t know if it helps, but they sure love it!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,350 Posts
Good reminder. Like you, I am in the UK and the sudden shift from snow a few weeks ago to hot sunshine comes as a bit of a shock. I have had to put away the thermals and dog coats, and dig out summer tops and water bottles, more or less overnight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
533 Posts
I've been looking on this forum and can't find a thread about such subject so I thought I'd start one! Hopefully this thread will be beneficial for both old and new dog owners alike.



It's that time of year again where the days are getting longer and warmer! A lot of us know how to protect ourselves during the warmer weather; but some of us don't know how to help our 4 legged pals.



Generally, plenty of water and shade will do just fine for dogs in warm weather. As most of us know, dogs can't sweat! They have to pant in order to cool themselves, however, this depends largely on breed. Sometimes, no amount of panting will help.



Brachycephalic

Some breeds called Brachycephalic breeds struggle. Brachy means 'shortened', and Cephalic means 'head'. These ‘shortened head’ dogs have a limited airway to breathe through due to several factors. Unfortunately, it’s these 'abnormalities' that give those breeds the cute looks we're attracted to in the first place. This has gotten worse in recent years as breeding has caused these dogs’ faces to be even flatter as it's what's desired, and this gets in the way of their breathing. In summer, these issues become worse,. Extra precautions must be made to prevent heat exhaustion and heatstroke from occurring.



For one, these dogs can have small openings to their nose, known as nares.



Not as much air passes through these openings compared to dogs with longer faces. Inside the noses are the nasal conchae, the bones in the nose that aid in filtering and cooling or warming the air coming through the passage. The problem with brachycephalic dogs, however, is that their conchae fills up a lot of their nasal cavity, since the cavities are so small to begin with.



Many might think that these dogs would be able to simply use their mouths to breathe when they’re hot, right? Unfortunately, there are soft palates in their mouths that prevent air from getting to the trachea. Their tracheas can also be up to a quarter of the size of those in longer-faced dogs.



Brachycephalic dogs may not have all of these working against them, but even just one can cause serious problems. For them, trying to breathe is similar to a person trying to breathe while they have pneumonia and a fully congested chest and nose.



Some examples of brachycephalic breeds include:

  • Pug
  • Bulldog
  • Boston terriers
  • Chihuahuas
  • Shih Tzu's
  • Maltese



Thick coats

Other dogs which may struggle in the heat include dogs which are better suited to colder climates like Huskies and Malamutes. Also dogs with 'wool' like coats such as poodles and Bichons as this thick fleece traps the heat.



So how hot IS too hot?

Dogs suffering from heat stroke will become restless and uncomfortable as their body temperature rises. They will pant, have trouble breathing and feel weak and lethargic. They may whimper, cry out or bark as their discomfort increases. Eventually, affected animals will be in so much distress that they will lie down, become listless and slip into a coma. Unfortunately, by this point, death is fairly imminent unless the dog receives immediate and aggressive medical attention.



Most of the time, heat stroke happens to dogs on days that are exceptionally hot. Heat stroke is most common in very old dogs, and in very young puppies that are prone to over-exert themselves. Owners of dogs with heat stroke may recognize one or more of the following signs of this dangerous condition:

  • restless or agitated
  • Vocalizing
  • Panting
  • Frothing/ foaming at the mouth
  • Excessive drooling
  • Difficulty breathing
  • High heart rate
  • Dry mouth and gums
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhoea
  • Lethargy and weakness
  • Confusion
  • Seizures
  • Coma
  • Death



If your dog displays any of these symptoms, medical treatment may be necessary. If you are unsure if it is too hot for your dog, I have attached a refrence which may be of use. View attachment 447953



How to keep them cool.

The primary way to prevent discomfort and danger in your dogs is to keep them out of the heat altogether. Keep them indoors if possible. If they must be outside always ensure that they have plenty of water and shelter in the shade.



Exercise is always important but during the warmer months you ideally want to do this at dawn or dusk as it's cooler. Keep the exercise/ activity short and slower pace and maybe it's worth walking your dog using a harness rather than a collar as using the collar will press on the trachea (breathing pipe) not allowing enough air in.



Ensure your dog is an ideal weight. Overweight dogs will have an extra hard time during the warmer months as they have a thick layer of insulation fat wrapped round their body which keeps the heat in rather than letting it out.



There are plenty of cooling pet beds that are suitable for both indoor and outdoor use. You could maybe use a kiddie pool filled with lovely cool water to help your pooch or maybe some frozen treats!



If your dog has a long and/or thick coat maybe consider having it shaved down into a shorter cut to help keep them cool. There are plenty of styles you can find online that are both fashionable and functional so get creative.



If I've missed anything please share any tips, tricks and hairstyles below. Lets raise awareness and try and limit the amount of dogs that may suffer in the heat this year!



REMEMBER, DOGS DIE IN HOT CARS!!​
Very useful resource. I admit that we often pay for "shore power" campsites while in Arizona just so His Highness can sleep in Air conditioned comfort! Had a good friend who lived in a big old house - she and her family put up with summer heat and humidity while her beloved Pugs had a special air conditioned room

Sent from my STV100-3 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,457 Posts
Good reminder Engel..Also it is good to know shaving a dog down is not necessarily in their best interest as their fur acts as a protector of the heat too. During our summer I walk early mornings and late evenings. We also have a boxer, a cairn terrier and a elderly chihuahua in addition to our st poodle. They all stay indoors except to go in the yard to potty. Also if you wa;l its good to let them walk on grass where available as the roadways hold the heat. Sometime people look at me when I feel how hot the trees is, lol.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,810 Posts
Living in S. Calif. means being aware of the heat all year long! PSAs about dogs left in hot cars run constantly, with a reminder that it is a misdemeanor to do so! For me and Molly it means late afternoon walks and checking how hot the sidewalks are! If we do have to go out in the heat of the day I put booties on her feet to keep them from being burnt! Oh yeah, a person can legally break a car window if a dog is legitimately in dire need of rescuing from a over hot vehicle! Police and Humane Society do it often here!
 
  • Like
Reactions: jojogal001
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top