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Hello
Our 16 week old poodle puppy has been allowed out this last week. Short walk each day, playing in the garden. However she eats everything when out! Mainly when she's in the garden, she will eat the grass constantly and mud/ dirt. If I follow her around she runs off so I'm worried she thinks its a game. It's getting to the point where I don't want her in the garden as this is all she does. I try to replace grass etc with a toy, play fetch with her but she's not interested. Any ideas?
 

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Puppy exploring the new exciting and interesting world...
It is worrying, frustrating and annoying, but comes with having a puppy.
Our one like many others did give herself a tummy upset, but again comes with the 'job in hand'.
Actually a bit of tummy upset isn't so bad as it helps build their 'immunity'.
Walking our one was a case of endless 'leave it , leave it', thought this will never end. ( Consisdered having 'leave it' playing on an endless loop on my phone ).
But it does.
Puppy realises eventually - like with many things - that it's not so very interesting afterall.
However, do have to keep an eye out especially in the garden for things like snails and slugs, certain plants ....
Perservenence, distraction, observation, plenty of praise when 'leave it ' is listened to, and you will get there.
I know because for a time we felt as you do, but things are much better now - mostly.
 

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Puppies explore with their mouths, so it's pretty normal for them to pick things up and/or try to eat them. Plus you're right in teething age so everything will be in the mouth at some point! Also... poodles are retrievers, so.....

Grass isn't really harmful (unless recently treated by chemicals) so it's not a huge concern - Limerick plucks grass every time he's outside. Eventually you'll find a toy or activity that puppy decides is more exciting than the grass. Dirt/mud is more concerning, but as long as we're not talking huge mouthfuls i would take more of a "remove puppy from the area" approach and try playing a game, with a toy, or doing training exercises in another part of the yard.

Research the plants, weeds, etc etc in your area to see what is and isn't poisonous to dogs. Including leaves and twigs from trees, flowers, weeds in the yards, and so on. When you're out and about you'll have to keep your eye open for anything on that list and avoid those areas until puppy no longer wants to eat everything. When i walk the boys i walk down the center of the road, and don't let them in anyones yard unless it's clear of litter (human litter and nature litter lol). The only things in the road we run into are sticks, stones, and leaves.

Now is a good time to introduce the commands "leave it" and "drop it" (or "trade me"). There are a ton of youtube videos on how to introduce and proof these commands. In the mean time, carry around treats when you're outside and every time puppy picks something up just get his attention and offer the treat as a trade. Most puppies will drop whatever they have in favor of the food reward. Praise and remove the puppy from the item (not the item from the puppy) - use treats to lure if needed.

Limerick is constantly picking things up. I offer treats in place of them and he'll actually come to me when i rattle the treat jar, and spits the item out for the treat without me even saying anything else. Dublin won't come to me, but if i have a treat he'll stay put and trades when i go to him. FAR preferable to do it this way as opposed to going in after whatever they have - Kiley, previous dog, would not trade anything she grabbed for a treat and actually became possessive of whatever she had to the point where we just had to let her eat it (unless it was dangerous, then we risked a bite.)
 

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Elroy: Standard Poodle, Born 02/20/21
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Everything is a game to a 4 month old poodle. Instead of following, run away and encourage her to follow you, then treat when she comes to you. Do you have a treat bag? Wear it every time you go out. Reward for actions you like (even if only the slightest bit toward a desirable action). Just ignore (unless dangerous) undesirable actions. Teach a simple command like sit, and reward for sitting. When she eats mud or grass, ask for a sit (or other reliable commanded action), then reward when she does it. Don't ever chase your puppy in an attempt to catch her, instead make her chase you. Reward her when she "catches" you. It works much better!
 

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I would just keep him/her on leash. The mud/dirt sounds concerning.

We have some oatgrass that grew out of the hay we use as ground cover. Basil will nibble on a blade - not a concern.

She ate a pea leaf too - not a concern.

Last year this time Basil was having the time of her life destroying the squash patch as a young puppy ~4 months old.

She's 1 year older now and more mature to know boundaries and okay to keep off leash.

As it's been mentioned, check what you have in your garden to see what's dog proof or not. We know garlic & rhubarb are heavily monitored when the pups are out, but they have no interest.

A curious nose can change direction with a sharp "no" or "hey!".
 

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Whats wrong with garlic? My springer spaniel had it every day for years.
Allium (onions, garlic, and relatives) aren't really good for dogs or cats. They contain compounds that can cause anemia and some other issues in amounts that an animal might actually be capable of ingesting in a real world situation. As with any plant, there's some variation in how much of the problem substance any particular plant contains.
 

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Another springer lover here. I did take precautions about garlic and relatives. My springers lived a long workining life. Don't know if it had anything to do with avoiding the garlic, etc.
 
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I used to give Zebedee garlic tablets as advocated by Buster Lloyd-Jones. She lived til 17 and a half.

Interesting.
 

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Had the same problem at that age. He doesn't do it now at 19 months. What we did at the time was a combination of drop it training as well as preventing the habit. That meant we made sure he was too busy with games in the garden to go eat random stuff and once he starts doing that (finding stuff to eat) instead of playing, we go back inside. With dangerous things we trained drop it or exchanged it with treats. Otherwise we didn't go the leave it leave it leave it route because that is so exhausting.
 

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This thread isn't about stopping your pup from eating the salad that is a yard, but will offer some ideas on how to bring your pup's focus to you.

 
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