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I am getting a female twelve week old toy puppy next week and will be spending the summer in a cabin on an island. There is sand and boardwalks (and no cars!) Any tips about the best way to housebreak this puppy?
 

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I always pad train my toys first, we incorporate outside after she's learned the pad. I think it makes it much easier for travel especially.
 

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It will help if you think of it as house 'training' and not house 'breaking.'

As the trainer your job is to grab up the pup when she tries to go inside and get her out. ; )

Better yet, keep an eye on the clock and take her out frequently, using words of praise when she goes. Teach her a keyword so that in time she will eliminate on command.

This all takes time and patience.
 

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The good part of a toy sized dog is that they housebreak quickly. Often by age 12 weeks.
The bad part of a toy sized dog is that they housebreak quickly.
You cannot ever let the puppy have the opportunity to relieve herself indoors, unless it is a puppy pad or newspaper. Unlike a large dog with a large window to house train, your teensy dog has a teensy window to house train. Use treats so she will want to go outside.
 

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The good part of a toy sized dog is that they housebreak quickly. Often by age 12 weeks.
I really disagree with that statement. Toy dogs in general are notorious for being hard to housebreak. At 12 weeks, in my opinion, and I’ve had many, many dogs, no dog is housebroken. It’s just not possible, their bladder is not mature enough.

All my small dogs have been taught to go outside, even in out harsh winters at -40. Even my 4 pound chihuahua. But some took close to a year before being reliable.
 

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Physically, your pup's system will not be mature enough to deliberately "hold" any eliminations til 6 months or more. They'll understand sooner than they can fully comply so the idea is to get them out or on the pad, frequently, so they don't have the chance to make "mistakes".

The general guideline is that they can physically hold things for about one hour for about every month of age and will need to be taken out or to the pad
every morning directly after waking
after breakfast
after napping
after playing or exercise
after lunch
after playing or exercise
after napping
after dinner
after playing or exercise
after napping
just before going to bed
1-2 times thru the night

If you're not actively engaging with your pup, crating, expen or tethering will help you to help her be successful. By learning her "tell" when she needs to go will help. Keeping her in the correct size crate keeps her and the dwelling safe when you're not together. An expen gives her a bit more room where she can have a small crate, pee pad, safe toys, water, food, available.

I haven't looked at your previous posts so I just want to be sure that you know about hypoglycemia in toys and that you have a first aid kit and references put together since it sounds like getting help on an emergency basis could be tricky ;). It sounds idyllic tho.
 
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