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We have a 11 month old standard poodle who was an amazing puppy at night, never whined in her crate and sleep through the night very early. We just got another standard poodle, a 13 week old little boy. This is his second night at home, the first night wasnt bad but now anytime we put him in the crate he barks nonstop and is so loud. Last night he barked for 3 solid hours in the middle of the night. We waited it out because thats what i have heard to do is to wait and they will learn not to bark. Any ides to make it better? We covered his crate but he pulled cover through the wires into his crate, he some how pushed the bottom plastic part out of the crate....he was not happy, lol!

Has anyone ever crated a new puppy with their other dog, because I am thinking he doesn't want to be alone
 

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Aw, he’s just a baby and he’s confused. It is not recommended to crate multiple dogs together, and I would never do it with 2 puppies of different ages like you have.

On night 2, if you couldn’t hear the ruckus that comes with pushing the pan out of the crate, then I don’t think you can hear the puppy well enough.
I slept on the floor next to Phoebe’s crate for several days when she first came home. My bed is only steps away, but that was too far. She slept pressed up against the bars, with my fingers touching her back. For another few days, I sat beside her as she settled, then got into bed. I also will read aloud, quietly, to myself if they start crying or whining, sometimes they will quiet down just so they can hear. But no matter what, they know I am there, but not addressing them and being pretty boring!

Your older pup was an easy one. 😉 Honestly, I think puppies are like babies. Some sleep easily, some dont. Some will eat anything, some won’t. There are things you can do to sway the odds in your favor, but I will always chuckle to myself when someone takes credit for their newborn or new puppy sleeping happily, where the adult wants, right away.
 

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Going to a new home is a big life change for the little baby, so he might need a little more support. It sounds like you got really lucky with your first pup, but remember that 13 weeks is still basically an infant who's been taken away from everything he's known. Some fussy nights are very much to be expected.

I slept on the couch, next to the puppy pen, for a week or so after bringing my boy home. Then gradually moved back to my bedroom by starting the night napping nearby then moving to my own bed when he was asleep. You might also try adding one of the Snuggle Puppy toys to his pen. I didn't use one, but other people swear by them. It's basically a stuffy toy that plays a heartbeat sound to make them feel a little less alone.

I know there are different philosophies on how long to 'wait it out' but with such a young puppy, so new to my home, I wouldn't let it go for more than 5 minutes before doing something about it. Waiting for a micro-pause in the barking, then taking him outside for a potty break, maybe try re-settling him in the crate/pen with a treat or chew.

When they're older, if I know all biological needs are taken care of, I might let it go a little longer before interrupting. I think letting them bark for hours is only going to let them practice an undesirable behavior and create a bunch of bad feelings about the crate.
 

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I agree his issue is probably loneliness and fear. He's just a little guy. At this stage I think waiting it out is the wrong strategy. At this point he is scared. A scared dog has a very hard time learning. They simply can't think or reason effectively when they are in a panic. All they remember is they were in a bad situation and it was scary. At this stage I think it's best to try to make him feel as secure as possible.

When I bring my puppies home for the first week I usually sleep on the couch with them tucked between me and the couch back, so they don't roll off in the middle of the night. I have the crate right next to the couch. Usually they wake up me up by squirming in the middle of the night; it's usually an indication they need to go pee. I grab the puppy and sprint for the door outside, hopefully getting there before the puppy starts leaking. Once the puppy has done his business we return to the couch and attempt to go back to sleep. If the puppy tries to play I tuck him into the crate with some food and a toy and let him entertain himself while I go back to sleep without him.

During the first week I work very hard at getting the puppy onto a schedule. We get up in the morning, go potty, have a snack, play for a bit, and then puppy goes back to bed while I start working. Throughout the day we take regular breaks to go out and pee, play a bit, and have snacks before more napping. During the day the puppy is in his enclosure or his crate at any time when I'm not interacting with him. I put the crate next to my desk or within view of wherever I'm working. I do also use my older dog to comfort the little one at this stage. I never put an older dog in with a puppy in the crate. The two dogs need to be able to get away from each other. However, I will put the puppy in his crate and leave the older dog in the same room if I need to step out of the room.

After the first week the puppy generally has an idea of what the household schedule is. He knows where he is supposed to be and what he should be doing at any given time. He knows where I am supposed to be and what I'm supposed to be doing too. At this point it starts being less scary when he is left alone in his crate during nap times.

At this point I am also starting to learn the different vocalizations a particular puppy makes. The frightened "I'm scared and lonely" wailing sounds different from demanding "I'm bored and offended" barking. I will always comfort a scared puppy, but I let a demanding puppy cool his jets.
 

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I posted this in another thread yesterday, and it might be helpful to you, too:


I’d suggest starting from the beginning and rewarding for calm. With Peggy, we began by opening the crate door for a sit. Literally the moment she sat, the door (in her mind) automatically opened. Then you can open it for laying down. Then wait a few seconds longer before opening it. Then a minute.

The idea is that good things happen when puppies are calm in their crate, not bad things. If we start out “punishing” calm crate behaviour by leaving, we’re sending the wrong message.

Here’s another approach, from a highly trusted source, Dr. Ian Dunbar:


Throw a bit of kibble in the crate. Let him go in and get it; he’ll come right out again. Do this three or four times. Then, throw a bit of kibble in, and when he goes in to get it, shut the door and immediately feed him another couple of bits of kibble through the bars. Then, let him out, and ignore him for three minutes. Then, put a bit of kibble in the crate, shut the door, feed him five bits of kibble through the bars, and then let him out and ignore him for five minutes.

The next time, put a bunch of kibble in a Kong toy, along with some freeze-dried liver and a bit of honey in the Kong, so it is difficult to get the food out, and put the Kong in the crate. Let the dog in and shut the door. Before he’s finished trying to get all the food out, after about 10 minutes, open the door, let him out, take the Kong away, and ignore him for five minutes.

What is the dog learning? “When I’m in the crate, my owner talks to me all the time, she sits next to me and reads me a book, and keeps feeding me. And there are toys in the crate. There are no toys anywhere else – that crate is OK!”

If a dog is expressing dissatisfaction with its lot, you haven’t really done your job as a trainer to teach him to want to do what you want him to do.


 

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I crate my puppies (even the fosters) in my bedroom next to the bed. While I covered my current pup's wire crate with a towel, I've left the first 6" uncovered and can see that she starts the night with her head right at the front, maybe so that she can watch me out the side of the crate.

When I was leaving my home to work (pre-pandemic), I gave my puppies a kong in their crate as I left. This may be an idea to try at night. A chew may also help (though I've had to buy a bully stick 'holder' for my current pup because she swallows the last nub). My pup periodically plays with a toy, or chews a chunk of buffalo horn, at night in her crate.

My pup still doesn't go into her crate as well as my older dogs do; it's a work in progress. I save the best treats for this purpose (usually bits of meat). She isn't able to settle herself outside the crate, even when she needs a nap, so is crated several times throughout the day while I'm home.

Good luck. This time will pass quickly so try to look for the positives in young puppyhood.
 

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I wouldn’t crate a new puppy with an older dog. You want to build a good relationship between your two dogs.

I slept on a couch in the family room next to my puppy. My older dog slept next to me. I think it made it easier for my puppy. Puppy knew we were there; he wasn’t alone.
 

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Good news on the crate. Using enzyme cleaner could help. Also, if you put treats all around on the crate floor, he may grow more likely to avoid eliminating there 😉.
 
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